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How many people foster?

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
I was just curious as to just how many people foster cats/kittens on here. The reason I'm asking is because I've fostered in the past, and with it being kitten season and all, the foster bug is biting me again

I've been hesitant because one of my cats, Pirate, is suspected to possibly have feline herpes. However no cat that has been in this house has ever gotten sick like him. Even months after former fosters were adopted and I got an update from the lady that runs the rescue, no one turned up sick. So I don't think he's contagious with whatever he has (it's so hard to diagnose, we've done every test possible on the boy). Does anyone else have a cat that is kinda like mine and still foster? I always make sure that any cat that comes in here is 100% UTD and healthy, so there's as little as possible risk to my cats.
post #2 of 27
Yep, I do... Bugsy has Herpes, and has had 2 severe URIs since I got him in February. Lucky, my resident cat got the beginning of an URI from Bugsy once, but got rid of it easily on her own in a day or so.
I foster Hope, and she hasn't gotten... It is said that 70-80% of cats have herpes, so you are not alone... If they were in a shelter or a rescue, chances are they have it already.
I keep mine on L-Lysine, and they are all healthy and happy - Bugsy hasn't had a problem in a while...
post #3 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinalima View Post
Yep, I do... Bugsy has Herpes, and has had 2 severe URIs since I got him in February. Lucky, my resident cat got the beginning of an URI from Bugsy once, but got rid of it easily on her own in a day or so.
I foster Hope, and she hasn't gotten... It is said that 70-80% of cats have herpes, so you are not alone... If they were in a shelter or a rescue, chances are they have it already.
I keep mine on L-Lysine, and they are all healthy and happy - Bugsy hasn't had a problem in a while...

Yay! I was thinking the exact same thing- most shelter/rescue cats have some degree of something, so it wouldn't be that big a risk to foster again. Pirate takes Viralys, which is the lysine in gel form (tastes like maple syrup, it's actually quite yummy ) But even on it, Pirate still has flare ups. He's actually kinda in the middle of a flare up right now.
post #4 of 27
I have a long term foster with possible calici, he does share water bowl and occasionally food (when he pinches it!!) with the other long term foster but she hasn't got anything, even though he is currently having a flare up of his gums and eyes. Short term fosters are kept separate at the moment though, but that is due to aggression from the female long term foster.
post #5 of 27
I do although I've been taking a break from it for a while. I'm in the process of changing who I foster for as I had a lot of trouble with the charity I've been helping.
post #6 of 27
I foster, but I do not risk the health of my own cats. The fosters stay in a separate bedroom, and do not mix with my residents. Once I've had the fosters for a while, and have tested negative for all kitty diseases, then I let them go nose to nose with Stumpy and say hi, but that's the extent. Fosters don't ever get the run of the house.
post #7 of 27
First of all bless you for thinking of helping. This is the worst summer I have ever seen in 10 years of shelter rescuing. There are many cats and kittens in need of help.

I posted some below (there were 37 pix and the site made me cut it down to 17) and I also have a kit in the SOS section who needs fluids 3x weekly. All her expenses will be paid by her shelter. In So. Milwaukee you are close enough for sure. Plus the ones below, they would get them to you.


On the herpes rhino, it leaves the household within 18 hours after cessation of the virus. So long as you make sure to isolate the incoming kit(s) and your own kitty (with towel under the door) long enough for them to both settle in to where you can be sure neither will show signs of URI or other illness, you should be perfectly good to go.

Calicivirus is scarier b/c it is harder to eradicate remnants of that virus from what I have read.

In any case, a spray bottle of Oxyquat does wonders for sterilizing. It has no odor or scent at all and can be used on pillowcases, floors, uphostery, anywhere. Just leave it for 10 minutes and don't let traffic on it till it dries.

Good luck and again bless you for fostering.
---------------------------------------------------------------


Kittens and nursing Moms are VERY much in need of rescue in Terre Haute. All kitties are vaccinated, combo tested for FIV/FeLV, wormed, and flea treated.


Please help us save our babies and nursing moms!!! We are desperate!! These innocent little lives are in danger and we HAVE to get them out a.s.a.p. If you can help take one, two, or a litter, please contact us immediately. We can arrange the transport. We can alter any kittens/cats 2 lbs. and up (females $35 and males $25). Contact Niki at 812-877-4477 (nllaviolette@aol.com). Please take a look at our website for more available kittens/cats at www.thhs.org. Thank you!

Niki Laviolette Terre Haute Humane Society Cat Rescue Coordinator nllaviolette@aol.com 812-877-4477


Dexter & siblings Samantha & Jasmine (f) Michael & Julianna





Chastity (f) Cisco (m) Asher (m sibling to Cisco)


Dilly (m) Tilly (f) Willy (m)


Dottie & kids


Edison Edana Edlyn


Elita Ellery (m) Isaac


Kayden (m) Lincoln Friday (m)


Monday Thursday (m) Tuesday


Spitfire (m) Babalou (m) Summer (f)


Finesse & babies Hope & babies


Carry (m) Cheri (f) Ferry (m)


Cream Puff (f) Uno, Dos, Tres (male bengal mixes)


Helen, Hector, and Edward, Esmee, and siblings


Perfect (f)

post #8 of 27
I currently have two cats in my home and they keep me busy enough. I know that if I foster, I will want to keep the cat/kitten, and I just can't afford to do that, as much as I would love to. I would like to give a heart felt shout out to everyone who does foster cats, especially this time of year. Thank you once again.
post #9 of 27
I wish you were closer, I would foster for you, but I'm afraid Virginia is too far. I kinda foster, actually, I socialize feral kitten so they can be adopted out. Yours are so cute...

Mary
post #10 of 27
I foster kittens for our rescue, plus others that people bring me. Last year I had a total of 14. and I now have five 6 week old kittens. But there can be problems and I keep fosters completely separate from my cats and wash carefully between visiting the two sides. Last year I had two fosters die of FIP, which was devastating, though the other fosters that shared their quarters didn't get it. It did make me realise the dangers and made me more careful.
post #11 of 27
I should add to this also - I shelter for a rescue place, where all cats are fully vetted and negative for serious diseases before going in. Of course there will be problems with parasites, but it's ok - I just treat them during the introduction. I would not foster FeLV/FIV + cats, as I live in a 1 bedroom apartment, and have no space to keep them separate.
post #12 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinalima View Post
I should add to this also - I shelter for a rescue place, where all cats are fully vetted and negative for serious diseases before going in. Of course there will be problems with parasites, but it's ok - I just treat them during the introduction. I would not foster FeLV/FIV + cats, as I live in a 1 bedroom apartment, and have no space to keep them separate.

That pretty much sounds like my situation. I make sure that they are really healthy, with nothing contagious going on before they come into my house. I live in a 2 bedroom, 1 bath apartment (it's a duplex, I'm on top) and with the way everything is set up, I really don't have an "extra room" to separate fosters long term. The only room that I can even separate anyone in is the bathroom (which gets really hard with it being the only one in my flat). I can't put anyone in the spare bedroom because that is where all the litterboxes are. And I don't have any room for them anywhere else in the house (there's 5 ). I could possibly put one in the kitchen, but who wants a litterbox in their kitchen?! Certainly not me

I did have the first time I fostered a little problem with ear mites- the 3 kittens I fostered came in with them, but they were treated right when they arrived and I never had a problem with my cats getting da mites.
post #13 of 27
To be honest, if you don't have space I don't think you should do it. You really need to be able to separate the cats comfortably, so your cats don't get stressed and catch any illnesses, and so foster cats don't have to deal with the stress of being in a new place as well as dealing with resident cats who don't want them there.

Introductions take time, and to force that on the kitties puts everyone in a tough position.
post #14 of 27
Like sarahp, I have a separate room - a heated sunporch. I do not allow them access. The only time I made the exception (thinking the fosters were well), all six of my cats got a cold. That vet bill was unreal!

I currently have three kittens with varying degrees of ringworm, so I am really glad I have that room. They were feral-born and no one realized they had it until they came to stay and I found a bald patch!

Even though my cats never "meet" my fosters, they know they are there. The door between the living room and the porch is glass and many times, I've caught one or more of my cats just watching the kittens play.

I am with a spay/neuter group and there are usually plenty of kittens to foster, especially this time of year. I do it independently, as the closest shelter near me is a kill-shelter and has been know to euthanize pets they had out for fostering. The next closest shelter, a no-kill, is nearly an hour away. I work with them to find homes for my fosters but I pay them the fee when the time comes. It gets expensive but it is worth knowing the little buggers have good homes!
post #15 of 27
I foster independently. I pay for TNR of the local toms and right now have a pregnant female stray, along with her last litter. I've managed to get 2 kittens adopted out to new homes, but still have 4 here, and the new ones are soon to be on their way! If you could foster, and the bug is biting again, I'd certainly have to say that there is no time like the present.
post #16 of 27
I've never fostered a cat for a shelter or organization, but if I find a stray cat or feral kittens I will keep them until I can find them homes.
post #17 of 27
I fostered a cat once -- he's been living here for 5 years.

I also once fostered a puppy (I only had one cat at the time and was he pissed but God bless him, he adjusted quick.) I also homed a kitten for my rescue group for a week before he was going to his new home. My cats have all been adult rescues/adoptions, and I'd forgotten how hilarious kittens are. I think if everyone had a kitten sit on their head, no one would be depressed.
post #18 of 27
Keep in mind there's always the chance that while fully vetted, tested, etc - they could still have something. I had a kitty for 2 weeks once, then wham - ringworm! There were no other signs until one day. So you always run that risk.

I keep fosters seperated at first, depends on their needs where I keep them. I have 2 dog crates in my bedroom for starters, & can close the door. Keep in mind sometimes you can get them home to find out they don't like other cats - that sucked I had one like that for 9 months.

My Molly has herpes, I haven't had an issue with anyone who had a healthy immune system developing herpes, but I fostered 3 sickly kittens - two of which now have herpes probably thanks to Molly.
post #19 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brokenheart View Post
I fostered a cat once -- he's been living here for 5 years.

I also once fostered a puppy (I only had one cat at the time and was he pissed but God bless him, he adjusted quick.) I also homed a kitten for my rescue group for a week before he was going to his new home. My cats have all been adult rescues/adoptions, and I'd forgotten how hilarious kittens are. I think if everyone had a kitten sit on their head, no one would be depressed.
That sounds like my Mia- she started out as an adult foster, and she's been her for over a year.

I'm confused now whether or not I should foster again. I really don't have the means to separate them for a long period of time, and the ringworm thing is really freaking me out. I've heard about the treatment for that, and I really wouldn't want my cats going through that. What to do, what to do.
post #20 of 27
Oh I don't know if it counts but recently I kinda "fostered" a cat for my vet... Someone had caught this stray kitten outside the vet's office and brought him in. The vet got him all vetted and kept him at the clinic for the week, but it's closed on Sundays so she asked me if I could take him home for the weekend when I left on Friday. I agreed since he was all vaccinated/tested/everything already. He had a lot of fun at my house playing with my older kittens (and I had a lot of fun with him, I love young kittens!) and he already had someone who wanted to adopt him when I went back to work the next week.
post #21 of 27
I am surprised at people who foster without a separate room to keep them in - it isn't just the risk of transmitting diseases, there is the temperaments of the cats and the constant comings and goings that could stress your own cats - what would you do if you got a cat that really hated other cats, they could attack one of your own cats? I keep mine isolated for the first two weeks in case of illness and so I can see them on their own and assess their personality. They then get an hour or so out of their room to see what they are like with other cats, but that is it, as it is my cats home and I dont want them having to constantly deal with all these cats. I did used to do things slightly different, they used to get more time out, but I currently have a long term foster who hates cats, plus I have the foster with calici. The only time I do things different to that is if i have either a long termer due to age or a terminally ill cat, they will get slowly integrated (although the three terminally ill cats this year still had a lot of time in their own room for varying reasons).
post #22 of 27
I tend to agree with Bootigger - even though I have the separate room, my cats are a bit more jumpy/nervous when we have fosters. The last cat we adopted stayed for a time on the porch, so maybe they're not sure who's staying and who's not!

I have had to cover the door on occasion as one of ours, Gracie, is high strung to begin with. She's gotten so nervous, she's spent the entire time we've had fosters gobbling her food and then vomiting.

It is a little unfair to the resident cats because you can't really explain it like you might with a foster child. If I find it's made a real difference in the health of my own cats, I'll stop. No, wait - I'll find another way - maybe build a second home and do it there. Ah, fun to dream, isn't it?
post #23 of 27
I keep all cats or kittens I rescue to foster separated from my cats until they have been vaccinated, tested negative for FIV/FelV/etc, have a clean bill of health and have been wormed at least twice.
My cats don't usually get stressed when they meet new animals, they're used to other pets being around so it doesn't bother them (I've only brought in kitten-aged cats though.) I do have one cat who doesn't like other cats bothering her but she is used to other cats being around too and the others learn very quickly to leave her alone (she won't fight or anything, she will just hiss and/or swat once if another cat comes too close.)

Actually my youngest cats (1 year old) loved it when I had that temporary "foster" kitten, they were all excited to have a new playmate.

Here's a photo of the kitten and Harlequin cuddling:

post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by white cat lover View Post
Keep in mind there's always the chance that while fully vetted, tested, etc - they could still have something. I had a kitty for 2 weeks once, then wham - ringworm! There were no other signs until one day. So you always run that risk.
yeah that! I am just on the tail end of this situation. Thankfully, I keep a segregation room and change clothes in and out. Still, doing the 1:10 bleaching of the house and foster room clothes in an attempt to eliminate spores is a big PITA.

I foster/socialize feral kittens and they are not tested for anything prior to coming to me. I pay for everything, including first vaccinations before they get sent off to be adopted. I don't do any of the adoption process at all.

There is always a risk when fostering, but I really don't want to discourage anyone from doing it. The rewards are immeasurable. We all just need to be well informed and foster how it fits our situations.
post #25 of 27
If I were in your situation, I would look into the possibility of taking fosters from other foster homes where they have already been 'isolated' and shown to be illness-free, and then let those homes with isolation areas take in new kits.

I know that might put stress on the kitties i.e moving around, but it will make it possible for more cats to be saved overall and will reduce risk to your cats.

Just be sure to establish your criteria up front and to let the shelter know you do not have a realistic isolation area and you need cats that are definitely "safe" i.e. ideally that will come from another foster home that is free of illness and that the animals have been fully vetted, tested/are ok, wormed, treated w/revolution etc. etc.
post #26 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by booktigger View Post
I am surprised at people who foster without a separate room to keep them in - it isn't just the risk of transmitting diseases, there is the temperaments of the cats and the constant comings and goings that could stress your own cats - what would you do if you got a cat that really hated other cats, they could attack one of your own cats? I keep mine isolated for the first two weeks in case of illness and so I can see them on their own and assess their personality. They then get an hour or so out of their room to see what they are like with other cats, but that is it, as it is my cats home and I dont want them having to constantly deal with all these cats. I did used to do things slightly different, they used to get more time out, but I currently have a long term foster who hates cats, plus I have the foster with calici. The only time I do things different to that is if i have either a long termer due to age or a terminally ill cat, they will get slowly integrated (although the three terminally ill cats this year still had a lot of time in their own room for varying reasons).

My cats are VERY used to other cats of all ages coming and going. And I totally understand what you're saying about the temperament thing. However, I require that any cat that comes into my house be okie dokie with other cats. I can be pretty much be sure of this because I make sure that I only take in cats/kittens that have already been in other fosters for a long time with other cats, or been at the rescue for a long time (it's a VERY small rescue, not like a shelter or anything. One lady runs it, that's it ) so I somewhat know the temperament and personality before I get 'em. And if ANY problems arise, I can immediately on-the-spot have them go back to the rescue. And I agree 100% with what you say about it being your cats home first and foremost. My main thing when I foster is that my cats come first. Everyone else comes second, because like you said this is their home and not the fosters.

(I should probably note that for the first day or more if needed, I do keep the new fosters in the bathroom. But it really gets tough when it is the only bathroom in the house. Plus it's a smaller bathroom. Old house, old rooms )

It's really great to hear so many people foster. It's one of the most rewarding things I've ever done in my life!
post #27 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BarbB View Post
If I were in your situation, I would look into the possibility of taking fosters from other foster homes where they have already been 'isolated' and shown to be illness-free, and then let those homes with isolation areas take in new kits.

I know that might put stress on the kitties i.e moving around, but it will make it possible for more cats to be saved overall and will reduce risk to your cats.

Just be sure to establish your criteria up front and to let the shelter know you do not have a realistic isolation area and you need cats that are definitely "safe" i.e. ideally that will come from another foster home that is free of illness and that the animals have been fully vetted, tested/are ok, wormed, treated w/revolution etc. etc.
Yup, we're on the same page. That's one of the reasons why it's so hard for rescues/shelters to place them with me. I'm INCREDIBLY picky when it comes to the type of cat/kitten that enters my home. Like I'm so picky that if the cat is not fixed but has 110% of the other stuff that you mentioned, I won't take them. My kitties come 1st!!! yes indeedy!
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