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post #91 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
Sadly I am seeing more and more instances that indicate new generations have no idea of spelling, grammar and general everyday use of the language. I hear young people talking and after every couple words they say, "you know" or "like". The overuse and misuse of the word "like" in everyday conversation by many young people makes me crazy. Example: You know, like, I went to the store, like, and there were like 20 different kinds of soup, like, you know. This is terrible English! I sincerely hope we don't "adapt" to that form of speaking.
I use the word like a lot. But not as much as you did in your example lol. The way i'd say it would be "i went to the store and there was like 20 different kinds of soup"
You know what I found HILARIOUS before I knew any american slang was when I heard someone say
" And I was like" ....It's just funny because it makes absolutely no sense and it didn't to me back then..I felt as though I was speaking to a four year old trying to explain his gestures to me, but then instead of saying what they're like they will instead tell me what they said..

example:
"And I was like no you're wrong and then she was like no i ain't"
lol
Or I still hear people say this "And i'm sittin' there goin' like what u talkin bout"
Honestly, I'm always startled by people who talk like this because I don't know how to talk to them I'm afraid that when they hear me speak proper English they will think i'm totally weird or that i'm doing it on purpose just to show off! haha
I don't think we're going to adapt to this kind of speech. I just dont' see it happening.
post #92 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by calico2222 View Post
Ok, let me ask...was that me?? Those are two words that always confuse me and I have to think about them. I was actually going to post that those are hard but you beat me to it. Thanks for explaining it again...my MLA english book is packed up somewhere and I KNOW I have that page marked.
No, it wasn't. But i think it was someone who has posted in this thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockcat View Post
I'm glad I'm not alone, because I'm pretty sure it's me!
Not you either....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockcat View Post
As much as I hate to admit it, I still don't completely get it. For instance, if your carpet is water damaged, is it affected carpet? The water had an effect on the carpet. We removed the affected carpet. ???

Sorry I bug the snot outta you.
But the phrase 'the water had an effect on the carpet' is a tired way of saying it... i.e. it sounds funny to me. (sorry, I learned how to write, but not all the terms that go with it... something like past present, I think there's a participle in there, or something... my grammar books are buried right now) ... you would normally say, "The water affected the carpet." it 'influenced' the carpet... here's an excerpt from what I posted earlier: When you affect a situation, you have an effect on it. I think of Affect as 'the action of' and Effect as the 'aftermath of' or the result.

The water (or you) affected a change in the carpet (or whatever you're changing). it is confusing. A lot of it depends on how you write the sentence... what you wrote above is correct, but the way I worded the same sentence is also correct... The English language is a pain to learn, especially American English. I've tutored in ESL, and I had a heck of a time working with my students...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
I hear young people talking and after every couple words they say, "you know" or "like". The overuse and misuse of the word "like" in everyday conversation by many young people makes me crazy. Example: You know, like, I went to the store, like, and there were like 20 different kinds of soup, like, you know. This is terrible English! I sincerely hope we don't "adapt" to that form of speaking.
It has pervaded more than just 'young people. I hear it a lot from folks of all ages here. I fell in to that as well, but only when I speak. I do not write that way. I think my writing 'slip' would be ellipses. I do make a conscious effort to not put them in my fiction, though... unless they're necessary.

I don't mind some of that, to a degree, but the rules are there for a reason, so we can ALL communicate in what is pretty much the same language. Yes, things change... not always for the better, but they've been changing way too fast and not out of a need to change... but (as I see it) a pure laziness to learn the accepted way. Text Speak, Thug Talk, Valley Girl are all variants of English... but if you put that cr** on a resume, anyone with half a brain reading it would toss it in the trash. In 40 years, that may not be the case. (I kinda hope I'm retired by then, so I don't have to deal with that).

I, for one, put in my online singles ads (yes, I do that, not like it's done much) that if you can't spell and use proper grammar, don't bother. (I also put if you don't like cats, keep walking). I still get men contacting me despite that... and they have horrid spelling! I have a 55 year old man who just emailed me through one... I read his email and just shuddered... he has a Bachelor's Degree... obviously didn't have any emphasis on grammar and spelling. Yes, it bugs me... and I could go on, but won't... I have lots to do today... and I'm getting chatty again...

Amanda
post #93 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by SwampWitch View Post




That's correct, looks like you've got it.
YAY!
post #94 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by RubSluts'Mommy View Post
No, it wasn't. But i think it was someone who has posted in this thread



Not you either....



But the phrase 'the water had an effect on the carpet' is a tired way of saying it... i.e. it sounds funny to me. (sorry, I learned how to write, but not all the terms that go with it... something like past present, I think there's a participle in there, or something... my grammar books are buried right now) ... you would normally say, "The water affected the carpet." it 'influenced' the carpet... here's an excerpt from what I posted earlier: When you affect a situation, you have an effect on it. I think of Affect as 'the action of' and Effect as the 'aftermath of' or the result.

The water (or you) affected a change in the carpet (or whatever you're changing). it is confusing. A lot of it depends on how you write the sentence... what you wrote above is correct, but the way I worded the same sentence is also correct... The English language is a pain to learn, especially American English. I've tutored in ESL, and I had a heck of a time working with my students...
I know it was somewhat of a strange example. I work in a field involving water damage mitigation. I'm glad I got it right, anyway. Thanks.
post #95 of 109
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ut0pia View Post
I use the word like a lot. But not as much as you did in your example lol. The way i'd say it would be "i went to the store and there was like 20 different kinds of soup"
You know what I found HILARIOUS before I knew any american slang was when I heard someone say
" And I was like" ....It's just funny because it makes absolutely no sense and it didn't to me back then..I felt as though I was speaking to a four year old trying to explain his gestures to me, but then instead of saying what they're like they will instead tell me what they said..

example:
"And I was like no you're wrong and then she was like no i ain't"
lol
Or I still hear people say this "And i'm sittin' there goin' like what u talkin bout"
Honestly, I'm always startled by people who talk like this because I don't know how to talk to them I'm afraid that when they hear me speak proper English they will think i'm totally weird or that i'm doing it on purpose just to show off! haha
I don't think we're going to adapt to this kind of speech. I just dont' see it happening.
I certainly hope not. I wonder if the people that cannot speak proper English even know proper English and that's where this whole question for me comes up. I find it hard to believe that people who have been taught proper English cannot speak it during ordinary conversations. I'm not talking about texting or chat room speak - I'm talking about everyday conversational speech and that seems to be seriously lacking IMO.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SwampWitch View Post
I'd rather adapt than go crazy!
Ah, but I'm so close that it would take so little to push me over the edge!
post #96 of 109
I moved from Connecticut to Florida over 25 years ago. I promised myself that there are words I would never say, but then...

I said y'all. I waitressed and bartended then. I found that when I asked a group of people "what can I get you" I would get no response. I thought surely the word you is both singular and plural in this part of the country, but apparently not. I found that by saying y'all, my job was easier.

One day I heard myself say "I'm fixin' to." I couldn't believe it.

I almost said "I reckon" last week, but I caught myself. They are not going to make me do it!
post #97 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockcat View Post
I moved from Connecticut to Florida over 25 years ago. I promised myself that there are words I would never say, but then...

I said y'all. I waitressed and bartended then. I found that when I asked a group of people "what can I get you" I would get no response. I thought surely the word you is both singular and plural in this part of the country, but apparently not. I found that by saying y'all, my job was easier.

One day I heard myself say "I'm fixin' to." I couldn't believe it.

I almost said "I reckon" last week, but I caught myself. They are not going to make me do it!
That's a big problem with the language itself, there is no way to say you in plural!
post #98 of 109
I remember trying to write a note to someone, years ago while still in Texas, and I was trying to figure out how to word it. I put:

"I tried to get aholt of you"

and then I thought, "aholt" is not a word! So I wrote

"I tried to get ahold of you"

but that wasn't right, either, and I tore that up and finally wrote:

"I tried to reach you"

LOL!

"Aholt" is common in speech there but it sure looks crazy when you try to write it!
post #99 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by RubSluts'Mommy View Post
The water (or you) affected a change in the carpet (or whatever you're changing). it is confusing.
I'm sorry, but I believe you're confused, and should take a closer look at the rules you posted earlier. Use of the definite or indefinite article plays a role.

Quote:
The less common is a verb meaning “to createâ€: “I’m trying to effect a change in the way we purchase widgets.â€
Quote:
The water affected the carpet, i.e., damaged or discolored the carpet
.

To "effect a change" is to bring about a change.

Quote:
The recent outbreak of swine flu in Mexico has effected a change in Lufthansa's policies.
An example of what you're attempting to explain would be

Quote:
Global warming has affected, i.e., altered, the change of seasons in some countries.
post #100 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcat View Post
I'm sorry, but I believe you're confused, and should take a closer look at the rules you posted earlier. Use of the definite or indefinite article plays a role.
To "effect a change" is to bring about a change.
An example of what you're attempting to explain would be
I never said I was perfect at grammar... but I've yet to be corrected in papers by professors. Maybe in grad school they'll look at it more closely... can't say.

I've seen much, much worse out there... and I already said I have never been really good on all the rules. I know how to write it, but explaining grammar was never my strongest suit. Which is why I'm not a grammar teacher...

the whole 'to effect a change' is a less common/less used way of saying it. AIt's also confusing. in its standard usage, which is what I've pretty much been commenting on from the start, is that Affect is the action/verb, and Effect is the noun. Are there exceptions? of course. Which is why English is so d*** confusing. But when folks are getting it mixed up in basic usage, that's the problem. For the most part, people need to remember that Affect is the action, Effect is the 'thing,' the noun. Using Effect as a verb is less common, and much more formal. In most instances, folks here in the U.S. don't need or use it. In business, sure. Politics, most likely. but the majority of people here aren't used to such formality in their language. Heck, I've seen business memos that are riddled with errors and more lax language. Is it kinda sad? Yes, but such is our society.

~A~
post #101 of 109
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RubSluts'Mommy View Post
Heck, I've seen business memos that are riddled with errors and more lax language. Is it kinda sad? Yes, but such is our society. ~A~
I switched my mortgage to a different lender because the document prepared for me by the first lender was riddled with errors. I decided if they were not educated enough to prepare a legal document then they weren't capable of looking after my mortgage.

All resumes come across my desk before being forwarded. If I see a resume that is really bad in terms of spelling and grammar - it goes directly to "file 13". It is never seen again.
post #102 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by ut0pia View Post
standing in line ups? I've never heard of that one...
You'd say "you have to line up there", "stand in that line", "the line up is there", "I'm going to line up", etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
Using cheque in Canada instead of check, colour instead of color, neighbour instead of neighbor, etc. are not an issue for me. I just read it and say, oh that person is obviously American if the words are spelled incorrectly. I work in the Canadian office of an American company and when corresponding with them regarding "cheques", I write "cheque". They reply using "check".
post #103 of 109
Quote:
How do some others of you feel about our language and it's demise?
I feel that while I get sloppy when posting on an online forum, if I let that happen in law school it's considered massive failure and time to pack my stuff.
post #104 of 109
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LawGuy View Post
I feel that while I get sloppy when posting on an online forum, if I let that happen in law school it's considered massive failure and time to pack my stuff.
But, unfortunately not everyone goes to law school. I've seen instances where teachers cannot spell or use correct grammar themselves and I fail to see how they could possibly teach our young people under those circumstances. As I told that school principal when we had our interview for our daughter, if I cannot sew I seriously doubt anyone would put me in charge of a sewing class so how can teachers who cannot spell teach spelling? When I told them I would teach her to read and spell at home, they told me I should leave the teaching to them and concentrate on being a parent. I then told them that if I felt confident that they were capable of teaching her I would do that but since I knew her teacher couldn't spell and had not been able to teach her to read, that I would do that myself at home.

A lot of parents do not have the time (and some do not have the inclination) to supplement their child's schooling and I feel sorry for those kids.
post #105 of 109
^ This was in the local paper the other day (I tend to flip through them a couple days later) and thought of you.

http://comics.com/the_born_loser/2009-04-29/
post #106 of 109
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by strange_wings View Post
^ This was in the local paper the other day (I tend to flip through them a couple days later) and thought of you.

http://comics.com/the_born_loser/2009-04-29/

Yes, that about sums it up for me.

We had friends from Montreal (French speaking of course) that went to the southern US a few years back and they were telling us they got a real kick out of one sign in a restaurant that was offering "bojolay" as their wine suggestion of the day.
post #107 of 109
I hate it when people use text speak on the internet - there is plenty more room to type your message. An example is someone I know, nearing her 30s, and still cannot type proper english!

Quote:
hey sis...just got ur comment, ahh i see about ur ph......thou ya got no muney on it now its stuffed...oh no mean ya myt get new one...I said on text I cldnt get time to visit ya after work any day as been busy with work and things and didnt bring car to work as i pref catch bus, easy than find a parking grrr...and tho 2 come around dis weekend...lmk if ya be home ok.. holla back?? im on fb 4 a while and am got up....xoxo
What? myt? She always says 2dae - why not say today? I have trouble enough reading her texts but when it spills over onto the internet, I stop reading.
post #108 of 109
ok someone may have already said this but i hate people using double negatives, imagine the situation.....

your window gets broken and you go outside and see some youths throwing stones, you confront one and your met with
"i aint done nothing" which is a double negative, if you havn't done nothing, that means you have done something, you see?

or....

you ask your friend to loan you some cash and they say
"i aint got nothing" so if you done have nothing, thats clearly means you do have something?

hope you know what i mean!

another local one here is people saying....

bockle instead of bottle
puggle instead of puddle
miggle instead of middle etc etc

and a birmingham (uk) thing is to add "ing" on words instead of "en"...

going up the garding (garden) etc
post #109 of 109
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jezmondo69 View Post
ok someone may have already said this but i hate people using double negatives, imagine the situation.....

your window gets broken and you go outside and see some youths throwing stones, you confront one and your met with
"i aint done nothing" which is a double negative, if you havn't done nothing, that means you have done something, you see?

or....

you ask your friend to loan you some cash and they say
"i aint got nothing" so if you done have nothing, thats clearly means you do have something?

hope you know what i mean!

another local one here is people saying....

bockle instead of bottle
puggle instead of puddle
miggle instead of middle etc etc

and a birmingham (uk) thing is to add "ing" on words instead of "en"...

going up the garding (garden) etc
Aaaaand, a lot of British folks call me "Linder" instead of "Linda". Most annoying!

I also hate when people say washink instead of washing, i.e. any word ending in "ing" they pronounce "ink".
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