New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Albino Hairless Sphynx - Page 2

post #31 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinva View Post
Dont know much about the whole breeding thing.
This website http://www.catsinfo.com/breeding.html has some breeding info, I'm sure a web search would bring up more info, including which tests are necessary before breeding etc.
post #32 of 48
i wanted a sphynx but my hubby freaks out everytime he sees sphynx photos
i love them though
btw i've heard that albino cats may have a health problems, especially with hearing. i know for sure that white cats with blue eyes are usually deaf
post #33 of 48
Thread Starter 
Mine is very healthy, great eye site and excellent hearing. He comes when i call him and attacks my finger everytime i move it.
post #34 of 48
Sphynxes are a fascinating breed, a breeder here told me that they eat a lot as they lose more body heat than a furred cat, so burn off the calories quicker

True albino cats are unusual but usually have eye and ear problems, however brown based cats (chocolate & lilac) can have a slightly pinkish cast to the pupil whereas black based cats (black & blue) are a deeper black. The pinkishness is more obvious in colourpoint kittens giving a slightly pinkish cast to the iris also. So although I have no idea of the pedigrees of the parents, I would guess from your description of a white kitten with pinkish eyes that you more likely have a chocolate or lilac point kitten than a full albino. The parents would both have to either be or carry both brown and colourpoint for this to happen, and to either be or carry dilute for a lilac point, but it would account for the kitten's description - see if his ears and paws start to darken over the next few weeks, lilac will be less obvious at first being a very pale colour As all the genes involved are recessive, they can hide for several generations so it is possible the parents carry these genes even though they haven't had a kitten that colour before.
post #35 of 48
Sphynx definantly have a high metabolism in order to keep themselves warm. In fact most breeders recommend a high quality kitten food thru out their entires lives. Mine go thru dry kitten food like crazy. They are always are eating.
post #36 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZ<3Me View Post
i wanted a sphynx but my hubby freaks out everytime he sees sphynx photos
i love them though
See, you (well your hubby) have (has) to see them in personphotos just aren't the same. My husband and even I felt the same way, until we actually met some, now we live with the breed, and so do several friends and family members
post #37 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kai Bengals View Post

Never the less, I'd be interested to see any documentation you can provide to show that whole cats in breeding programs are at increased risk.
I own Sphynx and am friends with breeders, but don't breed Sphynx personally or any breed of cat. However, to me, It is just common sense that without the ovaries, one cannot get ovarian cancer. Also, a cat’s chances of getting pyometra when in heat goes down to basically nothing since heats are no longer an issue, and pyo is more common than one would think in intact cats and can be deadly, just like cancer can be deadly.
Same with testicular cancer, once you remove the testicles this concern is no longer there. The risks for those types of cancers and for pyo are completely eliminated after spaying and neutering.
Also, mammary tumors and prostate tumors are no longer a concern when spayed or neutered. And the problems like spraying by males goes down a lot when fixed. Also, the birthing problems that could come about for mom and kittens is none when the cat is spayed. No heats to deal with either. There are a lot of other benefits I haven't listed here either but sure you have heard of those, behavioral and health. Most of the time altered animals make better easier pets for their owners and less chance of worrying about accidental litters.
Ya know
Just some thoughts. I am not anti-breeder by any means, just pointing out some reasons for the benefits. Your cats are gorgeous btw.
post #38 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinva View Post
Never looked at it that way cococat. I will talk to the wife about having them fixed before they leave. Scan hearts? They go to the vet twice a year other than that we feed them quality cat food.
Hey, that is awesome Thanks for considering this! It would be great if you could fix them before they leave your home, that way you know 100% sure no doubt regardless of where they go during their lifetime they will not be producing more kittens upon kittens. They will just let spoiled pampered pet lives.

Scanning hearts is something some Sphynx breeders do to get a better idea of HCM in their lines at that time of the scan. You can google that and Sphynx to get more information on all of it.

Now for those pics
post #39 of 48
I can not wait to get my Cat. My Stripe had borderline Cancer in her Breasts 2 times and she was fixed. They had to remove one Breast and Nipple. She was 4 when it happened. I lost her at age 11 from Crf. My Sphynx will be fixed and microchiped. It also comes with Shots and food and a Blanket. I cant wait to get it. They are due in July and will be ready in Nov. Anyone have ideas for a name.
post #40 of 48
I highly doubt you have true albinos. What color are the parents?
post #41 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by cococat View Post
I own Sphynx and am friends with breeders, but don't breed Sphynx personally or any breed of cat. However, to me, It is just common sense that without the ovaries, one cannot get ovarian cancer. Also, a cat’s chances of getting pyometra when in heat goes down to basically nothing since heats are no longer an issue, and pyo is more common than one would think in intact cats and can be deadly, just like cancer can be deadly.
Same with testicular cancer, once you remove the testicles this concern is no longer there. The risks for those types of cancers and for pyo are completely eliminated after spaying and neutering.
Also, mammary tumors and prostate tumors are no longer a concern when spayed or neutered. And the problems like spraying by males goes down a lot when fixed. Also, the birthing problems that could come about for mom and kittens is none when the cat is spayed. No heats to deal with either. There are a lot of other benefits I haven't listed here either but sure you have heard of those, behavioral and health. Most of the time altered animals make better easier pets for their owners and less chance of worrying about accidental litters.
Ya know
Just some thoughts. I am not anti-breeder by any means, just pointing out some reasons for the benefits. Your cats are gorgeous btw.
I do understand the whole theory behind what you're stating, but in my experience there isn't much substantiated fact. My breeding experience with bengals spans more than a decade and in that time, not a single cat has developed cancer of any form, let alone rare one's such as testicular or ovarian.
I've had 3 queens Pyo in 10 years. Yes, it's a problem, but not a major one considering how many queens we've had over this period of time. Obviously spaying would eliminate this altogether, but then there would be no bengal kittens.

There just really isn't much evidence that cats in a responsible breeding program are at a much higher risk of health problems than altered cats.
These diseases like cancer usually don't present themselves in healthy breeding animals, with good pedigree's. The animals are bred for a short period of time, altered then retired to a wonderful long pet life.

Nature intended for animals to breed, that's why they have reproductive organs. It wouldn't make sense nor allow the species to thrive and continue on , if the reproductive organs were a major cause of fatalities due to cancer, etc.
I really think reproductive cancers in cats are due to poor genes and other environmental factors.

Just my 2 cents based on my experiences.
post #42 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kai Bengals View Post
I've had 3 queens Pyo in 10 years. Yes, it's a problem, but not a major one considering how many queens we've had over this period of time. Obviously spaying would eliminate this altogether, but then there would be no bengal kittens.
.
My thoughts are it is a major problem if that was a family pet, for instance, I only have one cat, the cat having Pyo would be a big deal to me. Better to just not subject the cat to that at all.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kai Bengals View Post
The animals are bred for a short period of time, altered then retired to a wonderful long pet life.
Then the observations aren't intact cats for life...I am glad to hear they are only bred for a short amount of time then retired to live the life of a wonderful long pet life
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kai Bengals View Post
Nature intended for animals to breed, that's why they have reproductive organs.
Cats don't live "in nature" anymore. Esp. the purebred cats, they are selectively bred for certain things and usually kept in people's homes.

But this is not on topic, and neither nor. I guess we can discuss it in PM or in another thread
post #43 of 48
Thread Starter 
What is your true opinion of a true albino?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sol View Post
I highly doubt you have true albinos. What color are the parents?
post #44 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinva View Post
What is your true opinion of a true albino?
Cats that lack eumelanin and phaeomelanin completely are albinos. In cats however all the pointed patterns (sepia, mink and colorpoint) are variants of albinism. True albinism however is extremely rare in cats and I belive most people that think they have an albino cat are wrong in their assumption.

White cats aren't albinos even though many thinkt they are.
post #45 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kai Bengals View Post
I do understand the whole theory behind what you're stating, but in my experience there isn't much substantiated fact. My breeding experience with bengals spans more than a decade and in that time, not a single cat has developed cancer of any form, let alone rare one's such as testicular or ovarian.
I've had 3 queens Pyo in 10 years. Yes, it's a problem, but not a major one considering how many queens we've had over this period of time. Obviously spaying would eliminate this altogether, but then there would be no bengal kittens.

There just really isn't much evidence that cats in a responsible breeding program are at a much higher risk of health problems than altered cats.
These diseases like cancer usually don't present themselves in healthy breeding animals, with good pedigree's. The animals are bred for a short period of time, altered then retired to a wonderful long pet life.

Nature intended for animals to breed, that's why they have reproductive organs. It wouldn't make sense nor allow the species to thrive and continue on , if the reproductive organs were a major cause of fatalities due to cancer, etc.
I really think reproductive cancers in cats are due to poor genes and other environmental factors.

Just my 2 cents based on my experiences.

This bit interests me, as when Blackie was diagnosed with mammary cancer, I did some research, and wrote an article on it, and I think one of the sites I found said it was the second most common cancer, and I did wonder about that, and whether pedigrees contributed that, as what I found was that cats spayed before their first heat is 200 times less likely to develop it, and this decreases with each heat until they are 2.5yo, and it seems that a lot of adults in breeding programs are spayed after this age, so surely they are at as much risk as an unneutered cat? As the average age for developing it is 10, would breeders be aware if it happened in one of their ex breeders who had been sold as a pet cat once spayed?
post #46 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by booktigger View Post
this decreases with each heat until they are 2.5yo, and it seems that a lot of adults in breeding programs are spayed after this age, so surely they are at as much risk as an unneutered cat?
I'd imagine that refers to cats cycling in and out of heat continuously though, where breeding cats are monitored and mated at the correct times.
post #47 of 48
My Stripe had borderline Breast Cancer. She had to have a Nipple and Breast removed. They sent it to Uc Davis and it had Cancer Cells in it. It started to come back a month later and was removed again. She was fixed and was 4 at the time. It was worth the money to save her. I lost her at age 11 to Crf after doing treatments for a year. Stripe was a feral we saved.
post #48 of 48
Wow, I'm glad you didn't leave our site there in the begining, yikes. I do think we could be a little more kind to people looking for advice. At least he isn't breeding domestics because he doesn't want to fix them.

I think you are a great person for asking for advice and caring about your cats. If you joined this site you obviously care about them. I hope you have recieved some constructive advice and don't take too much to heart. We've all been there.

I don't know anything about breeding, but it sounds like you are doing all the right things. If I were you I would start the contract thing. To have the cat spayed/nuetered by 6 months and to return the cat to you, if for any reason, the cat needs to be rehomed.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Showing and Ethical Breeding