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claws or declawed?

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
We're back from vacation and I'm going to call the local humane society to ask about adopting a couple cats when they have 2 that get along well and are playful and like being pet etc. The one thing that we are having a hard time deciding is whether to get declawed or clawed cats. We plan on keeping them in the house but who knows if they would ever try to dart out the door. A friend from work said she'd never have cats that have their claws still cuz they can be pretty destructive. What do you all think?
post #2 of 29
Im VERY against declawing cats, infact i dont think any vets in the UK do declawing as far as i know.

Ive always had cats indoor and outdoor and never had problems with their claws, yes they can claw furniture, but there are so many things you can get to stop that now, like sprays, or those sticky pads that deter cats.

If you really are against claws on cats then you can use soft paws, they are kind of like soft nail caps that fit over the claw.

I dont really see the point of them because my 2 indoor cats only ever scratch their scratching post, but i know alot of people like them and they at least arent cruel for the cat, this is them:

http://www.bloggingpet.com/images/r_soft_paws_.jpg
post #3 of 29
If you intend to get your cats declawed -- which you'll find this site is VERY opposed to -- then you should probably adopt cats who have already been declawed. Many countries have declared declawing illegal (unless it's for medical reasons) because it's considered to be inhumane. You should check out the resources on this site regarding declawing.

Declawed cats can have behavioural issues, caused by pain they still experience years after the declawing. In place of scratched furniture, you'll find inappropriate urination and defecation; instead of being clawed, you'll be bitten. Not ALL declawed cats have these problems, but enough do that it can be hard to find them homes once their original owners don't want them anymore. (In which case, adopting two who have already been declawed would be a kindness, if you think you can handle the potential behavioural problems.)

There are alternatives to declawing. Soft Claws or Soft Paws (also discussed on this site) are extremely popular; they're little sheathes that go over the cat's natural claws and reduce damage from scratching. Teaching your cat to use a scratching post is another method that works extremely well: if your cat is clawing up the furniture, put a scratching post beside the place she likes to scratch and redirect her attention to it every time she starts on the couch. All it takes is time, patience and training: my two cats don't claw up anything they're not supposed to, and one of them is brain-damaged, so trust me -- it can be done!
post #4 of 29
Thread Starter 
I don't intend to declaw any cats. I just didn't know which to get because the Humane Society has ones that are already declawed and ones that aren't. We were thinking about the not declawed cats because they'd be safer if they ever got out of the house. I didn't realize that declawed cats are more likely to have behavioral issues. That's interesting.
post #5 of 29
No declawing. If scratching is that big problem for you and you dont have any solution, use soft paws.

No declawing, I forbid this.
post #6 of 29
Peeps-

If you think you would ever even consider having a wholly-footed cat declawed, then adopt only declawed cats. If you would never imagine it, then get either one.

The declawed cats at the shelter are less likely to have behavioral issues than an average declawed cat, because cats that pee everywhere or are very aggressive likely aren't up for adoption.

Go to the shelter and meet the kitties. Maybe a declawed one will be the sweetest one there, and best friends with a wholly-footed one.

Just don't adopt a cat with claws if you would ever even consider having it declawed.
post #7 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zissou'sMom View Post
Peeps-

If you think you would ever even consider having a wholly-footed cat declawed, then adopt only declawed cats. If you would never imagine it, then get either one.

The declawed cats at the shelter are less likely to have behavioral issues than an average declawed cat, because cats that pee everywhere or are very aggressive likely aren't up for adoption.

Go to the shelter and meet the kitties. Maybe a declawed one will be the sweetest one there, and best friends with a wholly-footed one.

Just don't adopt a cat with claws if you would ever even consider having it declawed.
Thanks for the great advice. I won't declaw any cats. I guess we'll just go meet the cats and find ones that we like regardless of if they have claws or not.
post #8 of 29
That sounds like the best way to go about it, peeps. Just see which cat you like. I'm sure the people there will be able to tell you if they have any behavioural problems if they have been declawed.

It would be really nice to get a declawed cat just because they were probably given up for that very reason, but it depends on if you can handle the problems that may arise from that.

Also don't be put off of having a clawed cat by your friend from work. Cats can be trained not to do things they shouldn't, and as has already been stated, you can always use Soft Paws.

Either way, I hope you manage to find a cat that you love and bond with straight away Good luck!
post #9 of 29
I specified that I wanted a declawed cat when I was considering adoption. Gizmo fit the bill. She was declawed as a kitten.
She has a sweet and gentle disposition. If you get an adult declawed cat from the shelter, chances are its personality is set, and what you see is what you get.
post #10 of 29
our cat was declawed, and it was awful. they literally pull the claws out, ouch!! yes i know they are under anesthetic, but it still seems barbaric.
post #11 of 29
If you get a declawed cat, get one that's already declawed. PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE. do not declaw a cat after you get the cats. As one person suggested, if your worried about scratching get SOFT CLAWS.
post #12 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by CATTYBIRD View Post
If you get a declawed cat, get one that's already declawed. PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE. do not declaw a cat after you get the cats. As one person suggested, if your worried about scratching get SOFT CLAWS.
she's already stated she's not planning to declaw a cat - just deciding whether to adopt a clawed or declawed cat.

i adopted Chip - partly because he had been at the shelter for so long, & partly because he was declawed & i felt for him, poor homeless baby. he's done very well - occasionally poops inappropriately, but usually when he feels the litterbox needs refreshing. we have different ideas about that but his personality is all i could ask for. he's getting over his tendency to nip when his back end is touched [he's becoming more trusting ]. i'm really glad i got him!
post #13 of 29
I vote for clawed unless you really want declawed. But I would not get a clawed cat and then turn around in a few years and declaw him/her.

Declawed cats can have litter pan problems (not using it, going in other places, etc.) or become fear biters. They also cannot defend themselves properly if outside.

With clawed cats, you don't have destruction if you learn to trim nails and do it once a week or as needed; get a good quality scratching post; train the cat where to claw.

IMO if you care more about your furniture then a cat, then get a stuffed fake cat. I've raised many litters of kittens and have had many cats - NONE of my furniture has damage or looks like a cat used it. I only had one declawed cat in my life (1st cat - parents insisted on declawing). I trim nails on kittens starting at 3 weeks old and trim on a weekly or as needed basis.
post #14 of 29
Thread Starter 
I don't think I'll make claws a factor when we pick out a pair of cats after reading through all your comments. I have the book "Cat's for Dummies" and they give suggestions for getting them to use their scratching post.

I just called the Humane Society to see if they have any cats that are already bonded with each other and he said they have about 5 pair that we should come see. We're going to go to the pet store tonight and get some starter supplies like litter box, litter, food and toys and then go see if the right fur babies are waiting for us at the shelter tomorrow. After we get them, we'll get more supplies but I wanted to have the atleast basics before we picked them up. We already have car carriers from previous dogs. I hope we get lucky tomorrow.
post #15 of 29
Let us know how it goes and tell us about the ones you pick .
post #16 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolarityBengals View Post
Let us know how it goes and tell us about the ones you pick .
Will do.
post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolarityBengals View Post
Let us know how it goes and tell us about the ones you pick .
we'll be waiting [im]patiently!
post #18 of 29
Thread Starter 
Thanks!
post #19 of 29
Declawed cats need home too.
I in no way advocate declawing, but I feel very strongly about adopting declawed cats.

We went to a shelter to look at one particular cat one day. She turned out to be quite mean... and we were disappointed. While looking around just to see the other cats, we found Sassy - 8 pounds of 8 year old Persian-mix long hair fluff - and she had no claws - front or back. She let us hold her, and hug her, and we took her home that day!
Unfortunately, Sassy eventually had behavioral issues that we were unable to resolve - including terrorizing another cat, and eventually, attacking us. She never, however, had any litterbox problems - though she loved to dig. She was very happily and successfully rehomed to a place where she was a single cat.

Our current cats are both declawed on the front paws - we adopted them that way - PJ at ~9 years old, Teddy at 7 years old (PJ is now around 13ish, Teddy is 9). They are the most fantastic cats ever! PJ is amazing - has no problems of any kind - and it hurts just as much when she kneads me without any claws. Teddy has problems unrelated to his declawing (IBS), and has an occasional litterbox problem related to that.

It pains me to see that there are at least 100 declawed cats in my local area just waiting for homes. Yes, they can come with a host of problems, but sometimes, it just takes listening to your cat to figure out how to help them. Teddy couldn't stand the litter that we had used for PJ when we adopted him - so we finally got him something he liked, and all of his initial litterbox problems stopped. Both cats still paw at stuff like they're scratching - PJ goes after the carpet, Teddy goes after one side of a particular chair - and I bet with enough time, both of them will put quite a bit of wear in those two places. They are both cuddly lap cats who have never met a stranger.

I love my declawed babies and wouldn't trade them for anything (note: PJ is watching as I type this. She must know I'm taking about her!). If you adopt a declawed cat that presents with problems, PLEASE be patient and try some things before giving up (the same goes for an intact cat). The declawed cats didn't ask to have their claws removed, and from my experience with my and other declawed cats, many can be just the sweetest things ever. They get a bad rap a lot of the time and need to be given a real chance.

Also, if you're interested in a declawed cat, I have found that older ones - many of whom were declawed early on - are more well-adjusted. Then again, I love older cats, so I might just be biased.

Remember... the cat chooses you... if one with claws wants you, use all the alternative strategies - don't declaw!
post #20 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by shambelle View Post
PJ is amazing - has no problems of any kind - and it hurts just as much when she kneads me without any claws.
sounds like mine - both Pixel & Chip are declawed, & i swear they hurt me more than Cable or Java, who aren't. it's like they push REALLY hard, where Cable just sort of flexes her toes...
post #21 of 29
Not that there are a lot of "show people" on the site, but keep in mind that if you pick out a really pretty kitty and one day are bitten by the show bug, that most associations will not allow declawed cats to compete in any section. CFA is one - no declawed cats period - even in the HHP class.

I guess that since I've shown in HHP and pedigree, any cat I adopt, I kinda tend to look at the cat for "show potential"
post #22 of 29
Most of us get moggies from shelters. I've heard of purebreds in shelters but they wouldn't come with papers would they?.
I am actually not sorry that Gizmo is declawed; the cat is perfectly normal, playful and affectionate; she has a very strong grip, is in no pain, and my furniture remains intact. She still has all her instincts even though she doesn't have the claws.
Interestingly she has stopped most of her 'sharpening' elsewhere since getting her kitty palace. So people with 'furniture problems' would do well to get some nice well made cat trees. I will do this in future if I get a cat with claws. Meanwhile Gizmo is doing well enough for now, and she's enough for me.
post #23 of 29
Goldenkitty was referring to the Household Pet Division (HHP) in a cat show. This is for moggies of any variety and purebreeds who don't meet their standard. TICA allows declawed cats in HHP only. CFA does not as far as I know. So if you want to show some organizations will allow it and others won't. I've actually shown Autumn in HHP but she didn't like it.
post #24 of 29
Thread Starter 
I put this on the new cats thread but thought I'd post it here too so you know what we ended up doing:

We’re picking up our new fur baby at 2:15 today. We looked at the Humane Society last night and found a cat that loves other cats so we can get a 2nd cat in a while. He’s about 2 years old and he’s a brown, black, and white medium haired tabby. He’s very playful and is fine with being held and petted and combed. He loves the laser pointer so we had to get one of those. We picked up a bunch of other supplies last night too. He has all his claws so we got a nice scratching pole with the rope wrapped on it. We’re going to get a nice cat tree too. I’m off work at noon so I’ll go home and get the litter box filled and put away anything that he can get into before going to pick him up. I’m so excited to get him. I’ll take pictures this weekend and try to post some pictures next week. Neither me or my husband have had a cat in over 20 years so wish us luck.
post #25 of 29
Good luck! I'm glad you found a cat you like. Any thoughts on a name for him yet?


Can't wait to see pictures
post #26 of 29
Good luck and Congratulations!!!
post #27 of 29
Thread Starter 
They were calling him Frankie and we like that so we're keeping that name. It suits him.
post #28 of 29
From your description of him (black/brown/white) he's a brown tabby with white isn't he? Take pictures as soon as you can.
post #29 of 29
if you clip their nails enough, the vein inside will eventually recede further back and then you can then clip the nail further back, then they cant scratch as much. I never had a clawing problem with my cats, well one of then used to scratch the moldings around the doors, but I got him one of those cardboard scratchers and he LOVES it. I volunteer at a shelter and some of those cats that come in that were declawed will never be adopted because they are either mean or they dont use the litter. Id rather deal with some scratches than poopy floors!!
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