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What's the deal with Greyhounds?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
I know they often are used as race dogs... But how are they raised and taken care of from puppyhood and on? What I have seen is that they go up for adoption once the owner is not happy with the performance anymore.
What about adopting these dogs? Have they been properly cared for and socialized, and trained so that they can be proper family pets?
Are they not loved at all by their owners?
I once thought about the possibility of adopting a greyhound, but then heard that they did not have good manners and would run away if given the chance etc, and would not be housebroken... That they pretty much have not learned these things and therefor would not be easy to keep as pets.
Then I also learned that they usually will not be good around cats, so now that's pretty much out of the question, but I'm still curious about these things...
post #2 of 28
My friend's parents have one that they adopted and they say that it is a great dog.
post #3 of 28
For the most part, greyhounds are couch potatoes. They have to be forced out for walks. Given their druthers, they'd loll about the house, all day long.

They cannot be walked, without a leash, however - they will chase anything that moves and you'll never catch them. On my way to work, each morning, I see a woman walking five of them and they just all mosey along.

Check online for a Greyhound Rescue, in your area.
post #4 of 28
Their intital upbringing really depends on how their original owners run their kennels.
Typically though they are raised in outdoor kennels attatched to large, insulated barns.
They are loved (well, the dog racers I knew loved them anyway), but they are raising greyhounds for profit and most do not want to keep an unproductive dog on their hands.

Well kept, but lacking any social manners.

The upside is that they are very smart, so teaching them how to be house dogs is usually pretty easy.
post #5 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arlyn
Their intital upbringing really depends on how their original owners run their kennels.
Typically though they are raised in outdoor kennels attatched to large, insulated barns.
They are loved (well, the dog racers I knew loved them anyway), but they are raising greyhounds for profit and most do not want to keep an unproductive dog on their hands.

Well kept, but lacking any social manners.

The upside is that they are very smart, so teaching them how to be house dogs is usually pretty easy.


They are wonderful animals but they are trained to race till about 18 months so what they do before ???
post #6 of 28
I work at an animal hospital and have seen quite a few of greyhounds that come in that have been adopted through a rescue group. These are some of the nicest dogs I have ever seen.

Of the ones I have seen... we have drawn blood, taken xrays, etc and I've never had a problem with any of them. Never heard one growl or one show their teeth. There are some breeds that make me nervous (german shepherds the most!!) but I would never be afraid of a greyhound. They are just big sweeties.
post #7 of 28
Greyhounds are poor misunderstood creatures - They have wonderful natures, but unfortunately tend to get given away or dumped if they are not performing.

Yes, they will hunt and kill small furry things - But that has been bred into them and they cannot be blamed for human intervention.
post #8 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by jane_vernon

Yes, they will hunt and kill small furry things - But that has been bred into them and they cannot be blamed for human intervention.
Since my cats are small furry things that run, I would not leave a greyhound alone with them. But I have known several people who adopted them, and had great luck. But I read one account on-line of someone with one greyhound and one other dog. Both dogs were fine with the cats, but one day one of the cats was killed by the dogs. They think it started with a game of chase, and the greyhound just got carried away and killed its feline friend.

That said, I have an akita that I leave alone with my cats. But I would never leave 2 dogs loose with my cats, since hearing the above story.
post #9 of 28
Greyhounds are so cool! If I ever get to actually go pick out a new pet (mine end up showing up here, or someone calls and asks me to take them!), it will be a greyhound from a rescue I see at work. Those dogs are all so sweet. They just want to be petted! It never fails, a dog that has NEVER seen me before is my best friend in less than 5 minutes. A little bit of rubbing behind the ears, and I've made a friend for life. They lean on me and just love the attention. And every time I walk by them, they look at me just begging for more loves. The rescue isn't a bad deal, $200 and they've been spayed/neutered, I think mircochipped, had thier shots, and usually have spent enough time in a foster home that they have the hang of living in a house. I told one of the ladies "If I had a bigger yard, I'd sure love to have one." and she said they don't require a large fenced yard for them. Just something big enough for them to go out and potty w/o a leash is nice. Their motto is something about the fastest couch potato in the world, LOL! Nice doggies :-)

Amber
post #10 of 28
I've always loved greyhounds, such elegant looking animals.
But as my next dog will have to be a working dog, I'll probably rescue a corgi.
post #11 of 28
greyhounds are generally good dogs. the old racers need to be socialized, and tought that there is indeed glass there, and tend to be afaid of thier own shadow. they are sight hounds so a fence is a must, they tend to see a rabbit and take off, finding themselves a bit away from home and lost in a short time.

they are sweet dogs. i fostered a spanish greyhound, which i loved, i want one some day, i like tall dogs
post #12 of 28
Greyhounds are pretty mild-mannered. I think what you've heard of them (not having good manners etc) can be said about dogs from any breed. It's all about the upbringing.

Like how they say Huskies are near impossible to train cos they're so independent and couldn't give a hoot bout what their humans want out of em (kinda sounds like our kitty friends eh?), but I know many Huskies who are trained to perfection. With patience and love, I'm sure you could do anything with a sweet Greyhound.

Possibly gotta be careful bout the kitties though, I'm not so sure Greys, sweet as they are, won't give in to their chase/prey drive one day...
post #13 of 28
I was owned by 2 greyhounds once (with 11 cats plus a feral colony). Adopted the first at 22 months old and the second came to me at 6 months old (rare). They housebreak very quickly as they were raised in kennels most of their lives. They are couch potatoes - I gave a sofa to them as a bed, then gave them a waterbed to sleep in at night.

They also like to lean against you and many "chatter". They are actually very mild mannered, most of them don't bond to any one person as they love everyone equally, but my Tyler (the younger one) absolutely worshiped the ground I walked on. They are spectacular dogs but the downside is that they are prone to bone cancer, particularly in their legs (I lost both to bone cancer - one at 6 and the other at 10).

They have been bred for thousands of years to chase small furry creatures. While they never bothered the inside cats, Tyler did catch 2 of the outside ferals - they made the mistake of running away from him. With the second one, I put the fear of mom in him (I ignored him for 2 weeks) and he never touched a cat again.

Here is Doug with Bogart when he was a kitten. Bogart would crawl into his bowl when he ate and Doug would give me a look as if to say "can you get this kitten out of here please?" Doug was 82 pounds when we adopted him (to large to race) and grew to be 95 pounds. Very large for a greyhound. I miss my boys.

post #14 of 28
I understand the retired ones also make Great pets, there very loveable
post #15 of 28
When I volunteered for the local cat rescue, we adopted two cats into a home with a retired racing greyhound..they all got along great. One of the cats actually suffered from mental retardation.. and didn't always react the same way around her.. but she always ignored the kitty.

I want to adopt a retired racer sometime in the future =)
post #16 of 28
My boyfriend's family had an adopted greyhound when i moved in with them and she was the sweetest dog ever. They already had one older cat and I brought my cat Ullah with me. We never had any problems with the dog and the cats. The dog also never barked. Molly was housetrained, but she did have accidents sometimes. Overall she was very friendly and definitely a big couch potato.
post #17 of 28
I love the italian greyhounds, I really want one or a whippet but they are so expensive here.

I haven't had much experience with greyhounds but all the ones i've met have been nice and friendly
post #18 of 28
I would love to adopt a retired greyhound, but I've been afraid for the cats. Any chance that they'll chase the cats around the house if the cats decide its time to race around?
post #19 of 28
I know people who had a retired greyhound. These people also had cats and kittens. The greyhound ignored everyone. (cats, kittens and people)
post #20 of 28
I volunteered at Greyhound Pets of America of Greater Orlando over summer and so I dealt with a lot of those retired racers. They really truly are the sweetest things you'll ever meet. Yes, it is bred into them to chase anything small and furry, but most of them are actually cat friendly. If you get a greyhound through an organization like GPA they do "cat testing." The people at the organization know which dogs are actually cat friendly and which would chase the cat in a heart beat. Most greyhounds that come from GPA are fostered for about a week before they go to a home which means that housebreaking training has begun. The organization will give you a crate to use for about a month because they learn fastest by being crate trained. They're couch potatoes, like someone else said, though they do need to be on a leash at all times if they are to go outside where there is no fence. If you have a decent sized fence you won't have to worry about them jumping it, they're not jumpers. If you do have a fenced in area and you let them out, you'll see just how much running they like to do -- they'll typically only run about 2 laps in your backyard and then come back in panting as if they've just run a mile. They're great with children and very even tempered. They also don't have an undercoat meaning that people who are normally allergic to dogs probably will not be allergic to greyhounds, and it also means that they don't shed too much and don't get that "doggy" smell. If you adopt from GPA it is an AMAZING deal. You get a book on caring for a retired racer that they require you read before you actually adopt, you get a purebred greyhound, a muzzle (for training purposes), leash, collar, one month supply of flea medication, paperwork, usually a bunch of coupons, and a crate to train them in for somewhere between $200-$300 depending on which GPA offic you go through. It's just about the best deal you can imagine for such sweet natured dogs. Like someone else has mentioned they are leaners, which is such a cute thing, and they will want to be around you or someone in your household at all times. I can't wait to get one when I'm older, and I intend on having a few cats (a couple more than I already have) as well.
post #21 of 28
Greyhounds can be trained like any other dogs. Every greyhound adoption group stresses a fenced yard and to never let them off their leash. Once I took mine thru obedience training and got them to come when I called them everytime without fail, we lost the leash and didn't have a fenced yard. We have 10 acres of land, and mowed a race track out back for them to run on.

It was a glorious thing to watch them run around full tilt in our yard. The funny thing about them - they always had the need to run full out after a good poop.
post #22 of 28
Katherine, after reading your description of greyhounds, I've decided that is more than likely the kind I want! I especially like that they don't have the typical doggy smell .

Do you know if those little Italian greyhounds are similar to regular greyhounds? B/c I know Bradley's favorite breed is the Italian greyound...
post #23 of 28
I like to see greyhounds in shelters.. most get pts before 4yrs old
post #24 of 28
My ex-husband's aunt had a bad experience with an adopted greyhound. He was so used to chasing anything furry that it would track down and kill all the animals in the yard like squirrels,rabbits, nieghborhood cats that would stray into her yard and if I remember correctly, it severly hurt one of her own cats an several occasions... so be careful.
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by ugaimes
Katherine, after reading your description of greyhounds, I've decided that is more than likely the kind I want! I especially like that they don't have the typical doggy smell .

Do you know if those little Italian greyhounds are similar to regular greyhounds? B/c I know Bradley's favorite breed is the Italian greyound...
I don't know as much about italian greyhounds but they do have the same kind of coat as a full sized. The same goes for whippets. They're all jsut so cute.
post #26 of 28
With greyhounds they are usually socialized fine. You have to put tape or post-it nots on the windows so they know that something's there or they will try to run through the glass. You have to introduce them to stairs b/c they don't know what they are. And they think they are lap dogs! haha. They are really great dogs. I just don't like that they are so skinny... but they are good dogs.
post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by katl8e
For the most part, greyhounds are couch potatoes. They have to be forced out for walks. Given their druthers, they'd loll about the house, all day long.

They cannot be walked, without a leash, however - they will chase anything that moves and you'll never catch them. On my way to work, each morning, I see a woman walking five of them and they just all mosey along.

Check online for a Greyhound Rescue, in your area.


Oh, if only Ruby were like that!
post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beckiboo
Since my cats are small furry things that run, I would not leave a greyhound alone with them. But I have known several people who adopted them, and had great luck. But I read one account on-line of someone with one greyhound and one other dog. Both dogs were fine with the cats, but one day one of the cats was killed by the dogs. They think it started with a game of chase, and the greyhound just got carried away and killed its feline friend.

That said, I have an akita that I leave alone with my cats. But I would never leave 2 dogs loose with my cats, since hearing the above story.

i agree with not leaving your cat with two dogs, it's almost like a pack mentality starts, i was babysitting a friends dog max once, he's a lab cross rotweiler and he's the sweetest dog, he's been friends with nass since she was a pup but nass is a pure cross, half irish wolfhound and half english pointer and max has lab which is also a hunting dog, when nass is alone with the cats she's fine, she even sleeps with pandy and they have been best friends from the moment nass arrived at our place.

but that time i was babysitting max, pandy accidently got out of the room and max and nass were both in the house, she's not scared of dogs at all and she's tiny, she went straight up to max and kissed him on the nose but he was in a very playful mood and he chased her which caused nass to join the chase too, pandy ended up being cornered and looked quiet scared, i picked her up and took her back to my room.

they may not have hurt her at all but i love her way to much to take a risk like that.

with greyhounds, i think they are lovely dogs but i'm totally against greyhound racing, they breed thousands of greyhounds to only get a few who will be good at racing and once they get older they are usually killed.

i saw a story once about greyhounds and they people who bred them had this special train track where they would take the unwanted greyhounds to be tyed up and run over by a train.

i also saw hundreds of them cramped together in a truck on their way to be killed because they weren't needed anymore, i'll never forget the look on their faces, people who do stuff like that discust me and i won't even start on what i think about them


felicia
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