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Would you like a free kitten? UK only! - Page 2

post #31 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovejoelyo
how do you know people wont agree to it? as far as i know it happens fairly often. Sometimes its only taken as a warning and no one actually goes to visit. but if its put into a contract that they will then the person who adopted knows better then to sell them. and the fact of pure bred or not has nothing to do with it. its how determined the original owner is to make sure the cats adopted out are safe.
LOL if it's put into contracts that there are going to be suprise visits they will no longer be a suprise!
post #32 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovejoelyo
no need for swearing, i just dont get why you are so upset about people checking in. there should be no problem with that unles people have something to hide. your only helping the animals giving them a safer chance.
Who's swearing?
post #33 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by GameOver
Sorry i didnt know the thread got moved hehe, some brilliant ideas here i must say, it looks like we have made a mistake, as were getting attatched to the kittens, and we have named them! There so cute, and now so human friendly, there only 4 weeks and they sleep with us lol, its going to be hard to give them away.

We have 1 female, shes going to be spayed now, we couldnt do it as she was pregnant for 9 weeks etc, we will put ads up in the local shops etc with our number on.

We need to know, the mother is very protective of the kittens (probably completely normal), is she going to hate us or change when there gone?

Thanks

Sarah
She should be fine. Cats, unlike human, don't care for their grown children, and don't keep in contact.
post #34 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by semiferal
Whether the cats are mixed breed or purebred is completely beside the point. These are individual lives we're talking about and every one is as important as the next. I'm sorry, but the DSH kittens I have for adoption are no less worthy of excellent, thoroughly screened homes than the purebred kittens that someone else is trying to place.

Applications, reference checks, home visits, contracts, and fees are par for the course if you get a cat from a shelter or rescue, just because there is no other way to make sure a home is suitable. As much as anyone would want to be able to trust people based on their gut feelings, just about everyone who has found homes for more than a handful of animals could tell you a story of someone who looked great on paper or seemed great in person, but whose vet reference or home visit or reference check revealed something horrible. The process is not perfect, but for the most part it works.

It's true that some people will be put off by the idea of having to give references, etc, but in the end that's okay. It's much better to have the kittens for a while longer but know they have gone to wonderful homes in the end, rather than not doing a full screening and risking them going to homes where they may not be treated as they should be.
With all these requirements, sorry, you could end up raising these kittens yourself. Most registered breeders don't do all the things suggested, probably because they figured out they would end up with hundred of cats and no customers if they do a home study on their clients. Obviously, those are all good ideas if you want the kitten placed into a good home. All of this however assumes there will be a lot of potential clients to choose from. Is it realistic to expect that?
post #35 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by elizwithcat
With all these requirements, sorry, you could end up raising these kittens yourself. Most registered breeders don't do all the things suggested, probably because they figured out they would end up with hundred of cats and no customers if they do a home study on their clients. Obviously, those are all good ideas if you want the kitten placed into a good home. All of this however assumes there will be a lot of potential clients to choose from. Is it realistic to expect that?
It is very realistic to expect this, as evidenced by the number of groups that have these requirements and still place a lot of animals.

I don't think anyone does a home study. A home visit is a very different thing. No one cares whether your place is perfectly tidy or how expensive your home is, and no one is going to look in your closets or under the bed. But I do want to make sure your screens are secure, the place is reasonably cat-proofed, the place isn't filthy, the kids aren't out of control, there is no evidence of drug use or excessive alcohol use, etc. Just the bare basic things. The whole thing takes 15 minutes tops.

The number of "potential clients" isn't of concern to me. I just want good, permanent homes and nothing else. And since I make everyone sign a contract promising to give the cat back to me if they can't/won't/don't want to keep the cat anymore, it makes it even more important that I do a very thorough screening. I'd rather have someone with me for another year at the beginning than have them returned to me five years down the line -or worse, abandoned or dumped at the shelter.
post #36 of 49
When I adopted Lucas from the shelter they never did a home visit, but called me a month later to make sure things were still ok. The shelter here only does home visits for dogs. And though it's true many places has a bunch of requirements and they're still able to adopt, it is also true that these places have to euthanize many of their animals for not having enough people willing to adopt.
post #37 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by CCSR79
When I adopted Lucas from the shelter they never did a home visit, but called me a month later to make sure things were still ok. The shelter here only does home visits for dogs. And though it's true many places has a bunch of requirements and they're still able to adopt, it is also true that these places have to euthanize many of their animals for not having enough people willing to adopt.
The shelters that have a lot of requirements are obviously also prepared to keep the animals in for a long time if there aren't any people good enough to adopt these animals.
When I bought my persian cats, i was asked to fill out a questionare.
I also signed a contract, but seriously, I don't see how the breeder would have been able to inforce anything in that contract if I broke it. The contract didn't say they would take back the animals if I decided to get rid of the animals either.
I believe it was mostly done to protect the breeder as it said that the breeder wouldn't be responcible for any vet costs I might spend on the cat. I also had to take the cat to a vet withing 72 hours or the contract would be invalid.
post #38 of 49
wellington... (for your 2 questions)

Its doest matter that it is in a contract that you are going to do a surprise visit. It doesnt defeat the purpose... giving an exact time, exact day would defeat the purpose. And your not trying to be like a cop and just in and bust someone. You giving a fair warning that you still want to make sure the cats are being treated well.

And who swore... if you read back, it was chiclett_33 but thats beside the point.

In my opinin, not checking in on the cats is very irresponsible. You are the breeder and you have every right to make sure those cats are kept safe. and i love hissy's idea about bringing gifts to lessen the sting.
post #39 of 49
I have done home visits for cat rescues in Quebec - several different resces actually - they were emailed by people from NB or NS and as rescues with beautiful cats in Quebec (some 8-11 hrs away by car), they needed someone on the ground here before they would agree to adopt to any of these people - and the people had to go to Quebec by plane or auto if possible - to get the cat. No shipping in airlines! (tho I myself did bring one cat back with me to a good home, as has my sister who teaches law at a Montreal university)

I myself travelled 2-6 hours to visit these homes and used the questions the rescues have (and my own skills as a clinician) in assessing the people. Did everyone want a cat? How would they care for a kitty? Could they afford the costs of cat ownership? Did they understand the breed (in the case of Siamese, Sphynx and Bengal) - all the relevant questions. I also called all their references and with my own network in the medical community and with vets I know, checked the references. Anyone can say someone is great - how do we know that?? I talked to poeple in the community - esp small communities. I do many educational seminars for pediatricians in outlying areas so know so many people that way - and through clinics.

Then I did followups - I called the people and even home visits. It was part of the contract and anyine who truly loves a cat will not say no. One family doc I know was given as a reference and when I called her with my mission, she asked to adopt a cat too, lol

So I see no reason NOT to do home visits. You do not need to be obtrusive or invasive. Be polite and call ahead. I think if one takes a cat into a rescue or allows one's female to get pregnant, we owe it to the kittens and cats to make sure they have a goodf life! A good "owner" will understand that!

Just saw your question about mama - no, she may miss them for a bit but give her lots of extra attention and play with her. You may find that by the time her babies are 12 weekws, mama will be happy to be not needed quite so much any longer. In my own case, when I adopted YY, her mom (a Blue Point Siamese of impecible pedigree and prizewinner throughout the world) gave her most beautiful (I am a tad baised, lol) baby a lick on the head and rushed off. That was it, as if to say - she's all yours now, look out!!!

Actually, it is a bit of both. She will be relieved to not have the babies underfoot and love the attention but she will miss them but cats do not think like us - she is prob a good mom and giving them lots of attention and teaching them what they need to know. Just give her lots of extra care and love!!
post #40 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovejoelyo
wellington... (for your 2 questions)

Its doest matter that it is in a contract that you are going to do a surprise visit. It doesnt defeat the purpose... giving an exact time, exact day would defeat the purpose. And your not trying to be like a cop and just in and bust someone. You giving a fair warning that you still want to make sure the cats are being treated well.

And who swore... if you read back, it was chiclett_33 but thats beside the point.

In my opinin, not checking in on the cats is very irresponsible. You are the breeder and you have every right to make sure those cats are kept safe. and i love hissy's idea about bringing gifts to lessen the sting.
I think the idea of gifts is nice, but if us breeders went around doing that for every kitten it would soon get very expensive.

Ohwell I think we should get back on topic

Gameover: She wont get mad with you after they have gone. Make sure you keep them until they are ten weeks old.
post #41 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by elizwithcat
With all these requirements, sorry, you could end up raising these kittens yourself. Most registered breeders don't do all the things suggested, probably because they figured out they would end up with hundred of cats and no customers if they do a home study on their clients. Obviously, those are all good ideas if you want the kitten placed into a good home. All of this however assumes there will be a lot of potential clients to choose from. Is it realistic to expect that?
Registered breeders may not, but those of us who work in rescue do. These things are commonplace. And if a person weren't willing to sign a contract that enabled us to do visits, then they wouldn't get a cat from us. Breeders and purebreds have the advantage of those expensive little sheets of paper and the high price tags. Unfortunately, with a capacity of 300 kits at my shelter, for instance, home checks are a far cry more convenient. We don't want our cats to end up as dogfighting bait or test animals. Truthfully speaking, it DOES happen, at least where I live. And since it seems like the breeders you speak of are above the idea of going the extra mile to place mangy riffraff kitties, it's probably good that they've decided to work with purebreds.

Anyway. DO the home visits. Do write up a contract. Heck, disallow declawing in the contract if you want seriously compassionate/informed owners. Personally, I'd rather go that extra mile and make sure that my kittens were well cared for then lazily see them off to sub-par homes. But that's me. The way I see it, a life is a life and is worth that extra effort.

And don't worry: Treehouse does home visits, calls and has a contract against letting the cat outdoors and declawing. Also, ALL (all of them, no cat left behind) are spayed or neutered at 6 weeks (yes weeks, not months) or at admission. And we adopted out 535 cats last year, so obviously, it's possible and you probably will be fine with adopting them out.
post #42 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by lionessrampant
Registered breeders may not, but those of us who work in rescue do. These things are commonplace. And if a person weren't willing to sign a contract that enabled us to do visits, then they wouldn't get a cat from us. Breeders and purebreds have the advantage of those expensive little sheets of paper and the high price tags. Unfortunately, with a capacity of 300 kits at my shelter, for instance, home checks are a far cry more convenient. We don't want our cats to end up as dogfighting bait or test animals. Truthfully speaking, it DOES happen, at least where I live. And since it seems like the breeders you speak of are above the idea of going the extra mile to place mangy riffraff kitties, it's probably good that they've decided to work with purebreds.

Anyway. DO the home visits. Do write up a contract. Heck, disallow declawing in the contract if you want seriously compassionate/informed owners. Personally, I'd rather go that extra mile and make sure that my kittens were well cared for then lazily see them off to sub-par homes. But that's me. The way I see it, a life is a life and is worth that extra effort.

And don't worry: Treehouse does home visits, calls and has a contract against letting the cat outdoors and declawing. Also, ALL (all of them, no cat left behind) are spayed or neutered at 6 weeks (yes weeks, not months) or at admission. And we adopted out 535 cats last year, so obviously, it's possible and you probably will be fine with adopting them out.
You are obviously willing to wait a long time, years if necessary.
How long is the average stay for a cat in your shelter? I think all those are good suggestions, if someone is prepared to wait as long as necessary to place these cats.
post #43 of 49
I am getting ready to adopt out 2 of the 5 kittens I rescued, they have all been to the vet, they have been spayed, tested,shots,wormed, and treated for fleas, I am prepared to ask for the amount it cost me to get that done for all of them. I personally want to keep them all but I know I can't, but I thought would it be fair to ask if I could check in on them once in awhile, that they not be outside,that they are not declawed, and that if for some reason they decide they can't keep them I would be willing to take them back within a reasonable period of time, does that seem fair?I have so much emotional time in these kittens and there Momma witch I have, because it took me a year to catch her and of course they were included, and I Love them to death. I actually feel like I want to interrogate everyone under hot lights, but then I know that's dumb, I know there is no good way to know anything for sure about how they are being taken care of, I would like them treated like I treat them I am so worried that I won't think the people are right for them, they are coming tomorrow and I can't quit thinking about all of it. I'm a mess
post #44 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by elizwithcat
You are obviously willing to wait a long time, years if necessary.
How long is the average stay for a cat in your shelter? I think all those are good suggestions, if someone is prepared to wait as long as necessary to place these cats.
Cats on the main adoption floor stay, according to our adoption director Oliver Davidson, between 2 weeks and 3 months on average. Of the cats on that particular floor, it is highly unusual to see one that's been there for more than 90 days. For kittens, it's generally less time. However, our shelter has several different floors. It takes longer for FIV+ cats, older cats, special needs cats and socialization floor cats to be adopted out (some different examples of the floors we have for adoptable kitties). Also, we have the ISO where cats who are, usually for a major health reason, not adoptable, live.

Our shelter is the largest and most beloved and well-known cageless, no-kill in Chicago. Thankfully, there are a few others that are very similar to us who do the same work we do. I don't know what their adoption rates are, but ours are very good. 535 cats is more than one cat per day, remember. That's pretty darn good.
post #45 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by elizwithcat
You are obviously willing to wait a long time, years if necessary.
How long is the average stay for a cat in your shelter? I think all those are good suggestions, if someone is prepared to wait as long as necessary to place these cats.
If we don't wait as long as necessary for excellent homes to come around, then we would be placing them in mediocre or worse homes. And with the clause in the contract that mandates that the cats be returned if the adopter isn't going to keep the cat anymore, that would be beyond disastrous.

My question would be why a breeder, who is bringing these creatures into the world on purpose, would not adhere to these standards when placing kittens. That is what I find puzzling. If shelters and rescues can do this for their random bred DSH cats, certainly a breeder of pedigreed cats should be able to do the same!
post #46 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by semiferal
If we don't wait as long as necessary for excellent homes to come around, then we would be placing them in mediocre or worse homes. And with the clause in the contract that mandates that the cats be returned if the adopter isn't going to keep the cat anymore, that would be beyond disastrous.

My question would be why a breeder, who is bringing these creatures into the world on purpose, would not adhere to these standards when placing kittens. That is what I find puzzling. If shelters and rescues can do this for their random bred DSH cats, certainly a breeder of pedigreed cats should be able to do the same!
Some breeders ship their cats or sell them to customers that live far away. How do you suppose they can pop up for a surprise visit?
post #47 of 49
They partner with a reputable breeder in that part of the world - or someone else they can trust.
post #48 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by CyberKitten
They partner with a reputable breeder in that part of the world - or someone else they can trust.
Frankly, if I knew people who were selling me the cat are going to pop into my house un-unnounced, or better yet, tell someone I don't even know to visit that cat, I wouldn't be getting a cat from them in a first place. Did the breeder of your siamese cat pop into your house to check on him? I have two cats from two different breeders and I can assure anyone they haven't stopped by to see how the cats were doing. In fact, I don't know of any breeder that makes house visits.
post #49 of 49
I'm a fosterer in the UK, i actually foster for 2 different charities. One does home checks, one doesnt, but i prefer to do a home check. When i had a home check last year, the woman told me she was only bothered about seeing my current cats and hear me talk about them. I have been told that i am welcome to see one of my previous foster cats whenever I like, and i am ringing her later to see if i can pop in and see him at some point this week. It is nice to keep in touch with the people you adopt your cats out to, maybe more so when you foster as they are not just kittens that you know will be fine, in the case of the cat i am hoping to see this week, he was very poorly socialised and it took me 4 months to get him to the stage where he could be homed, and a further month to find that special person who was willing to take him on, as he was still a very nervous cat and still needed a lot of time and patience. Also, not all charities will allow their cats to travel for hours to get to a prospective home, my CP branch will only home in the area.
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