TheCatSite.com › Forums › Our Feline Companions › Cat Nutrition › Cats and raw eggs?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Cats and raw eggs? - Page 2

post #31 of 51
Thread Starter 
Sounds good guys, thanks
post #32 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravyn
I must, very respectfully, disagree. I've broken chicken bones in my hands and you couldn't cut anything with the edges (I tried on my hands, paper, etc. About the only thing that got marked was cold butter). Most vets WILL tout the dangers of any sort of raw feeding...mainly due to miseducation and the fact that pet food companies pay money to get a vet to 'support' their food (not saying that is what's happening here, but it is a common thing). I've heard extremely dumb things out of the mouths of vets.

Cooked bones are horribly dangerous. They're harder and splinter. Raw bones are soft and pliable and, as I mentioned before, I can break them by hand with very little effort (I regularly tear in half whole chicken backs by hand). Fortunatley, I have a very good vet, and I spoke with her candidly about raw feeding. She says she sees more incidents of pancreatitis from all the crap in processed foods than from any raw or even home cooked diet.

Dogs have the exact same digestive systems as do wild animals like wolves and coyotes. Kibbled dog food has been around roughly a hundred years (I think actually about 80). Before then, dogs were fed table scraps, scrap meat cuts, bones, and whatever they caught. Yes, if not taught to chew properly they can gulp a bone and choke on it. They can also gulp kibble and choke on it. There are rubber dog toys that can get stuck in their mouths as well. Any dog that vomits up anything and aspirates it is going to have serious problems. My dogs still eat bones and there are no longer even traces of bone fragments in their stools. My cats have the bones ground up with the meat to be fed to them, simply because otherwise they will drag it all around.
As I said, I know a woman whose poor dog was injured by the bones she put into his raw meat. That's enough for me to realize that bones are dangerous.
The vet who treated the dog also told that woman he sees many other dogs injured by bones in their raw food.
post #33 of 51
That's fine, I'm not arguing the point. I also know a woman who's dog choked to death gobbling kibble. Apparently, that's fairly common too. I'm not saying someone's dog wasn't injured by eating bones. I'm not saying it never happens. My point is, dogs can be injured eating ANYTHING. Dogs can choke on ANYTHING. Dogs can die from swallowing bits of stick while playing fetch. My vet saw one dog come in with a punctured colon from eating the wooden handle of a spatula, that splintered. They can even aspirate water and choke to death on it.

My dogs have enjoyed a massive and noticeable boost in health since switching over to raw. Many dogs I know have. To me, the risks of feeding processed kibble laden with indigestables and preservatives that cause pancreatitis, bad breath, gum disease, kidney disease, and numerous forms of allergies and cancer greatly outweigh the risk of feeding a healthy natural diet free from artificial additives, and out of the numerous people I've talked to in my years researching a raw diet, including bones, the tale of your friend is the ONLY ONE I've heard where a dog has actually been injured by the bones contained in the food. I said it was unlikely, not impossible.
post #34 of 51
My dog isn't fed raw diet, but since we get a side of beef yearly (hormone free, grazed cattle), my dog gets nice raw soup bones.
He also gets raw chicken thighbones regularly.
But he also isn't a food gulper, he chews everything.
The benefit for him is gleaming white, tartar free teeth, he's 4 years old.
post #35 of 51
I haven't read every word in this thread, but just scanning it over (excuse me if this was mentioned) I don't think I saw an explanation of what exactly the danger of raw bones is. We know the danger of cooked bones -- they splinter, resulting in sharp edges. Raw bones don't. But there are still twin dangers of 1) choking and 2) intestinal obstruction -- both from trying to swallow something too large to swallow. Both fairly low dangers, but both can be minimized if the cat chews the bone correctly before swallowing. Now, this is something that isn't immediately obvious. A cat that doesn't know how to chew bones? Yes -- a kitten learns how from momma cat. But many cats today have no experience dining on prey, or raw meat and bones, having eaten cat food their whole lives.

I've fed raw chicken on bone to my cats several times. Two of the three cats don't know what to do with it. The other cat, who was a stray in former life and probably survived killing prey, knows how to tear up the meat and properly crunch the bones before swallowing. So, my advice is, if you're going to try feeding raw bones and meat to your cat, closely supervise the first few feeding sessions to make sure that your cat knows how to properly crunch up and chew those bones before swallowing. Then you stand the best chance of avoiding the primary dangers from raw bones.

post #36 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by elizwithcat
As I said, I know a woman whose poor dog was injured by the bones she put into his raw meat. That's enough for me to realize that bones are dangerous.
The vet who treated the dog also told that woman he sees many other dogs injured by bones in their raw food.
Yeah and humans choke on food all of the time that dosent mean we stop eating the food that every human has ever choked on!
post #37 of 51
silly ?/ but how do you give a cat a bone?? or do you grind them
post #38 of 51
All of the raw foods and B.A.R.F. sites I've seen recommend a meat grinder for meat/bones fed to cats.
post #39 of 51
When I started the switch to put my cats on raw I did buy a meat grinder. Before, only my dogs were on it and they got the meat bits and bones whole. Now, its just easier to grind up the whole meat order than seperate out what is to be for the cats and what for the dogs.

The reason I grind the bones for my cats is because if I did not, they would be dragging bones all over the house trying to hide them from each other. My dogs still get huge beef soup bones to gnaw on recreationally, so don't really need the whole chicken or turkey bone...it serves the same purpose ground up with the meat and offal. I still give them whole turkey necks or wings on occassion as a treat, and have no problem doing so.

However having seen my cats chew through wood, I have no doubt they'd be able to crunch up chicken wings, bones and all, if I gave them the chance.
post #40 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by coaster
I haven't read every word in this thread, but just scanning it over (excuse me if this was mentioned) I don't think I saw an explanation of what exactly the danger of raw bones is. We know the danger of cooked bones -- they splinter, resulting in sharp edges. Raw bones don't. But there are still twin dangers of 1) choking and 2) intestinal obstruction -- both from trying to swallow something too large to swallow. Both fairly low dangers, but both can be minimized if the cat chews the bone correctly before swallowing. Now, this is something that isn't immediately obvious. A cat that doesn't know how to chew bones? Yes -- a kitten learns how from momma cat. But many cats today have no experience dining on prey, or raw meat and bones, having eaten cat food their whole lives.

I've fed raw chicken on bone to my cats several times. Two of the three cats don't know what to do with it. The other cat, who was a stray in former life and probably survived killing prey, knows how to tear up the meat and properly crunch the bones before swallowing. So, my advice is, if you're going to try feeding raw bones and meat to your cat, closely supervise the first few feeding sessions to make sure that your cat knows how to properly crunch up and chew those bones before swallowing. Then you stand the best chance of avoiding the primary dangers from raw bones.


Weird occurrence: The other day, I gave some raw chicken to my cats. Both mom and dad sniffed at it and had absolutely no idea what it was, and just stood there, meowing in curiosity. They would not even lick it. The kittens, however, dove right in and scarfed it all between the 3 of them. Neither mom or dad had any clue what the chicken was, and they both were rescued strays (mom @ 4-6 weeks, though, but dad was considerably older when we took him in (about 6 or so months). The kittens have been indoor cats from the day they were born.
post #41 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by CommonOddity042
Weird occurrence: The other day, I gave some raw chicken to my cats. Both mom and dad sniffed at it and had absolutely no idea what it was, and just stood there, meowing in curiosity. They would not even lick it. The kittens, however, dove right in and scarfed it all between the 3 of them. Neither mom or dad had any clue what the chicken was, and they both were rescued strays (mom @ 4-6 weeks, though, but dad was considerably older when we took him in (about 6 or so months). The kittens have been indoor cats from the day they were born.
I've tried to give Jamie raw meat (e.g.,organic beef filet) a couple of times, and he has the same reaction. He won't eat the mice he catches, either.
post #42 of 51
The first time I gave my dog raw steak, he looked at it, sniffed it, then looked at me like I was insane.
post #43 of 51
Thread Starter 
When i started feeding raw i tried several meats and the only one he likes is rabbit, that's what he gets everyday now, rabbit/bones with supplements, they get very picky even with raw food, mine eats 1/4 lb. of raw a day in three feedings and 1/4 cup of dry in the afternoon.
post #44 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by HUNTER
My homemade raw food recipe calls for raw egg yolk and i didn't really use it in the mixture up until yesterday and my cat really loves it, is raw egg yolk one of cat's favorite food?
Raw eggs are not good for cats. You should boil water and take it of the stove. Drop the egg and let it sit there for 5 minutes. The egg want be fully cooked but the bacteria would be gone. Also giving eggs on a regular basis is not good. Egg yolks are a very hard food for liver to process. That's just my advice. I'm not trying to say that this is what you should do.
post #45 of 51
I guess opinion is divided on this one. My vet recommended egg yolk beaten into goat milk for sick kittens (no kitten food/milk available here). Both Dushka and Persil thrived on that mixture when they couldn't take anything else.
post #46 of 51
This goes against my understanding of egg yolk and it's value to cats. click here and scroll down to the section on egg yolk

I don't believe if it were difficult for a cats liver to process, that this would be a key component of kitten glop used for orphaned or ailling kittens?

Can you give a link to an article that in discussing egg yolk and cats discusses their liver not being able to handle this - I would appreciate your noting it here so I could go read it.

Thanks!
post #47 of 51
I just stated my opinion and underlined that it was my opinion. I did not read an article online I have been told by a variety of people (from vets to my friends) that egg yolks aren't easily processed by liver. I will never post my opinion again. Sorry.
post #48 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by KatieLV
I just stated my opinion and underlined that it was my opinion. I did not read an article online I have been told by a variety of people (from vets to my friends) that egg yolks aren't easily processed by liver. I will never post my opinion again. Sorry.
Katie...this is how I learn..I read articles, so I can then share that back when answering a question. I know it was your opinion, I wanted to know what was behind it (I truly am that curious). I did not mean to offend you!

Sincerely,
post #49 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat & Alix
Katie...this is how I learn..I read articles, so I can then share that back when answering a question. I know it was your opinion, I wanted to know what was behind it (I truly am that curious). I did not mean to offend you!

Sincerely,
I was debating whether to post my opinion and my information that I have gathered. I did not say not to feed egg yolks, they have great effects on cats. Just not to feed it every day. I give eggs to my babies once or twice a month. And egg white once a week. My family cat who's going to be 16 this year has the same egg diet that I'm talking about and she has the most gorgeous coat. I didn't get offended. A lot of posts that I read I disagree on but I don't state my opinion not to confuse people.
post #50 of 51
Thread Starter 
Although my recipe calls for raw egg yolk, i only use one raw egg yolk mix with 1-1/2 lb. of raw meat and that last 10 days, so one raw egg yolk in 10 days, that's almost nothing, my point is, maybe eating too much of it in one day is not good.
post #51 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by CommonOddity042
Weird occurrence: The other day, I gave some raw chicken to my cats. Both mom and dad sniffed at it and had absolutely no idea what it was, and just stood there, meowing in curiosity. They would not even lick it. The kittens, however, dove right in and scarfed it all between the 3 of them. Neither mom or dad had any clue what the chicken was, and they both were rescued strays (mom @ 4-6 weeks, though, but dad was considerably older when we took him in (about 6 or so months). The kittens have been indoor cats from the day they were born.
The reason why is because when cats are kittens they are taught what is a source of food. If your adult cats were fed cat food as kittens they became fixated on it as adults because they only reconize cat food as a food source and not raw meat. The reason your kittens took to it so well is because they are still learning what is food and what is not.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cat Nutrition
TheCatSite.com › Forums › Our Feline Companions › Cat Nutrition › Cats and raw eggs?