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Is a cat a good pet for a busy person?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I've been toying with the idea of adopting a cat recently. Problem is I work for the railroad and am away from home for about 36 hours at a time, about twice a week. I would get an automatic feeder and a few things to try and keep the cat entertained while I'm away. My question is, is it cruel to leave a cat alone for so long? I don't think I want to get two cats.
Thanks
post #2 of 11

I'm not sure why you don't want to get two cats, as that would be the perfect solution.  They would have each other for company while you are away.  If you really only want one cat, and one that could stand you being away so much twice a week, I would suggest adopting an adult cat, definitely not a kitten or teenager, but an older one who is fairly quiet and sedate and just needs a lovin home to be in but doesn't have a lot of need for play and activity.  So many rescued cats fit that bill, especially cats whose owners have perhaps passed away or gone into nursing homes.  If you adopt through a rescue group, they will know the dispositions of the cat and recommend some that would fit your situation.  I'm glad you cared enough to write an ask for advice, and I do hope you consider it when adopting a cat.  They are like mirrors and reflect what you put into them.  Some people think they are distant and aloof but most of them are not, only the ones who never got much attention when they were growing up.  Even those come around with time and affection.

post #3 of 11

You did not mention where you live, but this would be the perfect type of situation for you.  This person is in Wisconsin and if you were actually interested in adopting her cats, there is a group called Underground Railroad Rescued Kitty Network that transports adopted cats from one state to another in a pony express type relay.  They are on Facebook and also have their own web site, you can google them if you are interested.

 

Here is a link to this woman's post.

 

http://www.thecatsite.com/t/303184/help-my-two-senior-cats-need-a-new-loving-home-together

post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the comment
I actually live in Canada, so unfortunately that wouldn't work out for me. but I agree most cats I know are actually quite affectionate and not very aloof at all.
post #5 of 11

hi i am also living alone in my house . I usually leave home at 7 am and get back from work to home by 11 pm night. Please guide me if I can really manage cat and how will I be feeding him? what should be his age? will it be ok if a put whole day food once in the morning? I will change litter tray at night only once, will that suffice?? I badly need a loving pet please guide? also guide me what should be the age of cat that suits me?2 or 3 months kittne is ok for me or not??

post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by hammaadac View Post

hi i am also living alone in my house . I usually leave home at 7 am and get back from work to home by 11 pm night. Please guide me if I can really manage cat and how will I be feeding him? what should be his age? will it be ok if a put whole day food once in the morning? I will change litter tray at night only once, will that suffice?? I badly need a loving pet please guide? also guide me what should be the age of cat that suits me?2 or 3 months kittne is ok for me or not??

How many days a week do you work? How long are you awake for when you come home before going to bed? Will you want to interact with a pet after being gone for 16 hours?
post #7 of 11

Would you consider pets other than a cat? Like rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters, and other small furries, even reptiles and fish and the like? Many are less "needy" than a cat and can be left alone for long periods of time as long as you check in on them once a day and provide food and water and some interaction.

 

Maybe you can try fostering a cat for the local shelter or rescue for a short period of time to see if a cat can fit into your lifestyle. Or if you do have some free time available when you are not working, volunteer at a shelter or rescue so you can be around cats and other animals but don't have the huge responsibility of caring for one 24/7.

 

If you are dead set on owning a cat, do not get a kitten especially not a very young one like 2-3 months old. Kittens are cute but they are A LOT of work. They are bundles of energy that cause mischief and need to be taught what they can and can't do. An adult cat would be more suitable if you don't want to deal with a kitten knocking your stuff off things and breaking them, chewing on electrical cords, climbing curtains, scratching your furniture, etc.

 

One important thing to seriously keep in mind is vet bills. Vet bills can be expensive and some vets don't offer payment plans or the like. You need to have some way to afford vet bills up front, especially emergency vet bills which can happen when you least expect it.

post #8 of 11
Fostering first is an excellent idea. We just adopted a pair of brothers. They're very content to hang out together.....to the point where they don't interact with us humans very much. We're hoping that starts to change.
post #9 of 11

I would definitely suggest two cats who get along for anyone who will be away a lot.  Cats may appear aloof to people who don't have cats because unlike dogs, they aren't usually that interested in strangers.  However, they are VERY attached to their owners in most cases and would be very bored and lonely with as little interaction as you suggest.  I too agree that fostering a couple of cats for a local shelter might be a good idea.  Foster homes allow shelters to rescue more animals, and you would have a real experience of what life with a couple of cats would be like.  If you grew to love them you could adopt them, and if not, you would provide a good home until they found a permanent home.

post #10 of 11

I think most people who have never owned a cat would be surprised at how much attention they need.  They have a reputation as being aloof and independent, but nothing could be farther from the truth.  It's really quite a commitment: litter box maintenance, feeding, grooming, play time, and (of course) cuddle & pet time.  Not to mention vet visits and tons of internet searching to solve problems as they come up.  The financial commitment is not to be overloooked, as LTS3 pointed out.   Having a cat also makes it harder to plan short vacations, which you may be used to doing a lot of now.

 

If you are thinking that you need a pet in your life, perhaps that's a signal that your work hours are not sustainable or healthy for you.  Maybe put some effort into addressing that first, before taking on something that will likely only add to your burdens.

post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by hammaadac View Post
 

hi i am also living alone in my house . I usually leave home at 7 am and get back from work to home by 11 pm night. Please guide me if I can really manage cat and how will I be feeding him? what should be his age? will it be ok if a put whole day food once in the morning? I will change litter tray at night only once, will that suffice?? I badly need a loving pet please guide? also guide me what should be the age of cat that suits me?2 or 3 months kittne is ok for me or not??

That's pretty much my uni schedule, and my cat is fine with it. 

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