or Connect
TheCatSite.com › Forums › Our Feline Companions › Cat Health › Vet will neuter our cat at 8-9 months old... Isn't that too late?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Vet will neuter our cat at 8-9 months old... Isn't that too late?

post #1 of 42
Thread Starter 

Hi guys :)

First off: I do not live in North America, but in Europe, more specifically in northern Italy. Also, I'm a new cat owner, and I'm informing myself mostly on english websites. That is starting to be a problem, since I often cannot compare foods and habits and I get confused over simple stuff as the difference between combing and brushing :D

 

Two days ago I brought Fletcher to the vet for his second shot and a visit. He is a very healthy, big guy, just turned 3 months old and is an indoor only cat. While there, I asked the vet when we would start talking about neutering him, and I was taken aback a little by his response, having read your advices over and over: he said that the clinic would neuter him at about 8 months old. After I expressed my perplexity, he said we could start talking about it at around 5 or 6 months old. Now, isn't it a little late anyway? I'd rather not go to another clinic for the following (non financial, really) reasons:

  1. this clinic is literally behind our condo, and we don't have a car. taking him to another vet, possibly recommended by friends, would mean a trip through several public transportation vehicles, and the weather is HOT here. 
  2. I love the vets there. they are wonderful people, work long hours and they have the best attitude towards animals. They love Fletcher and Fletcher loves them, which is weird because he's not really that confortable around strangers. And most of all...
  3. ... It is the clinic of a voluntary animalistic association: they save stray animals, both domestic and wild, they provide for them and cure them (even those severely hurt: here in Italy there is no such thing as a "kill" shelter) and find them home (if they are domestic animals) or release back into the wild in a properly selected environment. The clinic is not cheaper than the average vet clinic, but I feel like I'm giving my money not only to good people who take good care of my pet but to a good cause as well.
  4. finally, everyone of my cat-owning friends spayed or neutered their pets around that age, between 6 and 8 months. So I'm afraid that taking Fletcher to another clinic would be useless since this could just be how they do things around here :(

 

However, living in a small flat I'm really scared of the consequences of the kitten starting to spray around. :(

 

So, my questions are: 

  • when does a kitten start spraying? is there a way to delay that moment or to see it coming?
  • if a kitten sprays in the house, is there a method to conceal or get rid of the smell? I'm very clean regarding him, I scoop the litter several times a day, check his bottom after he goes an whip it with a wet towell if it's not perfect, clean his ears etc. I really don't want the house to smell bad but mostly...
  • ... I want him to be healthy and happy. The vet says that the delayed neutering will help him develop better, but I read around that a sexually mature not neutered kitten can be a very stressed house pet.
  • would you call another clinic just to check, or given the informations above you would stay with the current clinic?
  • should I push the vet to perform the surgery before 6 months of age or that would offend him?

 

I'm really confused and the geographic gap is not helping :( I probably just need some reassurance, since I got this kitten I'm just terrified of doing something wrong.

 

bonus pics :)

 

 


Edited by chiarabab - 6/30/13 at 4:04am
post #2 of 42

He is so adorable! What a lovely kitten. :)

 

It sounds like your vet is part of the "old guard" who still believes neutering young is bad. It's not. Studies have shown that kittens neutered early develop just fine. In fact, in a lot of ways, it's much better.

 

He can definitely start spraying and displaying other aggressive behaviors by 8 or 9 months. In fact, some cats go through puberty as early as 6 months.

 

Unneutered animals can be very stressed, especially if they're indoor. Ever fiber of their being is telling them to roam and mate, and they're kept from doing that.

 

Also, the earlier you neuter, the less likely the cat is to develop reproductive cancers later in life. There's really no downside to neutering early. Fletcher is actually old enough to be safely neutered right now, as a matter of fact.

 

I would try doing some research and then bringing that in for the vet to examine, and argue your case. If he still refuses, I would call around and go to another vet who will do it sooner for this one procedure.

post #3 of 42

Five or Six months will be okay - I have had many cats over the years and they were all neutered at around that same age as where I live thats the age they are done. If he is the only cat in the household its less likely he will spray. If there are any accidents you can purchase urine neutralizer products that work really well they break down the proteins in the urine and get rid of the smell - you spray the product and leave it for a while on any urine and it foams up then you can clean the area. The one I use is called Odarid - there are several similar products around that do the same thing - get unscented though if you can.

post #4 of 42
One of my boys was 8 months old and the other was over a year old when they were neutered. The 8 month old had strong smelling urine, but neither were spraying. They were neutered "late" because that's when I got them. I've never had a problem with them spraying and they met each other after coming to their new home after being neutered.
post #5 of 42

A comment triggered by your second image - are those flowers lilies? If yes, lilies are very dangerous for cats if they nibble on them. Much safer to decorate with cat-safe plants and flowers.

 

He is a magnificent young cat, very handsome.

post #6 of 42
He's adorable! Neutering at 6 months seems to be about average in Europe, where "pediatric neutering" hasn't become widespread. Perhaps you can talk your vet into doing it at that age by telling him you're concerned about the possibility of spraying.

Lilies are extremely dangerous for cats. Here's a warning from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration about them: Lovely Lilies and Curious Cats: A Dangerous Combination
Quote:
It’s also important to remember that while lilies, a common household plant, are lovely to see and smell, they are still a safety threat for our cats. The entire lily plant (leaf, pollen, and flower) is considered to be toxic for cats. If you have lilies in your home this Easter, make sure that your cat doesn’t eat any part of the plants.

Symptoms of lily toxicity in cats include lethargy (decreased activity), vomiting, and loss of appetite. These symptoms worsen as the kidney damage progresses, leading to death. Early veterinary treatment is critical.
post #7 of 42
Thread Starter 

Thank you all! I am much relieved, and you've been wonderful and informative as you always are.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Catapault View Post

A comment triggered by your second image - are those flowers lilies? If yes, lilies are very dangerous for cats if they nibble on them. Much safer to decorate with cat-safe plants and flowers.

 

He is a magnificent young cat, very handsome.

ahah, I have no idea what kind of flower those were, they were put on the fridge for the specific purpose of preventing him from nibbling on them. well, guess who learned to jump on the fridge in that exact moment! The flowers were sadly thrown away a few seconds after taking the picture (you know how the old saying goes: first you take the picture, then take out the danger!), despite being perfectly ok, because we don't have safe spots anymore and we don't want him eating them! :D

 

btw, are tulips ok? I adore tulips! But other than some bunch of flowers I sometimes pick up at the supermarket this is a plant-free house: I couldn't keep one of those green thing alive to save my life! (I am a bit better with cats, I swear)

 

edit: I just read that tulips are dangerous as well. No more tulips in this house, then! Lucky for us, we have a very decorative kitten. If I could just convince him to stay still into the vase, now...

post #8 of 42

Ciao Chiarabab! My husband is from northern Italy and we went for a visit last year. It's such a beautiful part of the world!

 

About neutering at 8 or 9 months, the vets in my area all told me the same thing. Their reason was that they wanted to wait until the testicles descended; I suppose that is because they aren't prepared to do a pediatric neuter, which requires a slightly different technique and/or equipment. However, I was able to find one who was willing to neuter them at about 6 months as long as the testicles were at least showing.

 

I would advise you to talk to your vet and ask politely if he would be willing to neuter your kitty earlier. He might be more flexible if he knows your reasons. If not, call some other vets and simply ask what is the earliest they are willing to neuter a cat. It can't hurt to ask, and if you find one who will help you, you can still keep your nearby vet as your regular vet.

 

Se vuoi, puoi scrivermi in italiano. smile.gif

post #9 of 42

I had a vet insist on 6 months.  At 5 I called up saying we must be wrong on age he is spraying EVERYWHERE as I was terrified of spraying.  He took him in that week.  Vet was very old and was told years ago he waited longer.  He also holds off on puppies till nearly a year old.
 

I held out on a neuter due to a heart murmur.  He started to spray around 8 months.  I held out on 2 kittens due to serious lack of money(about 10 years ago was broke from the kitten milk as they were hand raised) and one sprayed at 6 months and the other one never picked it up.  They were done at 8 1/2 months old. 

 

I think they tend to spray faster if there is another unneutered male around.  Only thing I found to get rid of smell was bleach water.  That was for the hard surfaces/rugs(made it up very light to prevent staining)  the wall was another matter.  Even after scrubbing it I smelled if until I repainted that area.

 

The smell will be bad even if he is using the litter box if his urine changes over to that smell.  You may need to dump the litter more often(even though you are using scoopable litter

post #10 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthKitty View Post

About neutering at 8 or 9 months, the vets in my area all told me the same thing. Their reason was that they wanted to wait until the testicles descended; 

Yes, that's what he told me as well. Other than that he's a great guy, it would feel like a betrayal to go to another vet :( but I will most definitely call around, thank you!

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthKitty View Post
Se vuoi, puoi scrivermi in italiano. smile.gif

That is such a nice thing to offer, thank you :) anyway I would feel bad towards other forum members that wouldn't understand us... Let's keep it in english, I feel confortable enough even if it's clearly not my first language :D

post #11 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiarabab View Post

Hi guys :)

First off: I do not live in North America, but in Europe, more specifically in northern Italy. Also, I'm a new cat owner, and I'm informing myself mostly on english websites. That is starting to be a problem, since I often cannot compare foods and habits and I get confused over simple stuff as the difference between combing and brushing :D

 

Two days ago I brought Fletcher to the vet for his second shot and a visit. He is a very healthy, big guy, just turned 3 months old and is an indoor only cat. While there, I asked the vet when we would start talking about neutering him, and I was taken aback a little by his response, having read your advices over and over: he said that the clinic would neuter him at about 8 months old. After I expressed my perplexity, he said we could start talking about it at around 5 or 6 months old. Now, isn't it a little late anyway? I'd rather not go to another clinic for the following (non financial, really) reasons:

  1. this clinic is literally behind our condo, and we don't have a car. taking him to another vet, possibly recommended by friends, would mean a trip through several public transportation vehicles, and the weather is HOT here. 
  2. I love the vets there. they are wonderful people, work long hours and they have the best attitude towards animals. They love Fletcher and Fletcher loves them, which is weird because he's not really that confortable around strangers. And most of all...
  3. ... It is the clinic of a voluntary animalistic association: they save stray animals, both domestic and wild, they provide for them and cure them (even those severely hurt: here in Italy there is no such thing as a "kill" shelter) and find them home (if they are domestic animals) or release back into the wild in a properly selected environment. The clinic is not cheaper than the average vet clinic, but I feel like I'm giving my money not only to good people who take good care of my pet but to a good cause as well.
  4. finally, everyone of my cat-owning friends spayed or neutered their pets around that age, between 6 and 8 months. So I'm afraid that taking Fletcher to another clinic would be useless since this could just be how they do things around here :(

 

However, living in a small flat I'm really scared of the consequences of the kitten starting to spray around. :(

 

So, my questions are: 

  • when does a kitten start spraying? is there a way to delay that moment or to see it coming?
  • if a kitten sprays in the house, is there a method to conceal or get rid of the smell? I'm very clean regarding him, I scoop the litter several times a day, check his bottom after he goes an whip it with a wet towell if it's not perfect, clean his ears etc. I really don't want the house to smell bad but mostly...
  • ... I want him to be healthy and happy. The vet says that the delayed neutering will help him develop better, but I read around that a sexually mature not neutered kitten can be a very stressed house pet.
  • would you call another clinic just to check, or given the informations above you would stay with the current clinic?
  • should I push the vet to perform the surgery before 6 months of age or that would offend him?

 

 

Them doing lotsa of free advanced treatments on homeless makes them also better surgeons and generally more skilled.  They are thus more experienced and better surgeons than an average vet clinic.

 

I think also it is nice of him to admit he han discuss a somewhat earlier neutering, than his normal 8-9 months...  So he has his old rules, but he is not rigid with them at least.

 

I say, keep to him for dear life!

 

To your questions:  You can have maximal unluck, but quite few sprays immediately they become fertile. Many arent spraying the first youngling time, well behaving, and began to spray more seriously first when they are fully adult, at 14 months+.

Like someone mentioned, they spray more if there are other fertile toms or females in heat.

 

If there are none nearby, chances are good he will not spray till he is at least 10 months, with any luck - even more.

 

cleaning sprays with biological enzymes as cleaners are effective here.

Wash off the worst with 1.  "acid" water (forget for the moment what the acid is named, you can use it in food), this neuters the urine.  2. Soap water.  3. Spray on. Done.   :)

 

 

In Sweden we had long a standard of spaying at 12 months.  While it was OK for inside only cats, it was of course devastating for cats allowed to go out.  Making surely a lot of homeless...

Nowadays the standard is 6 months.

I hope they will accept the modern standard of 10v or 1+ kg.

 

 

Good luck!

post #12 of 42

I agree with many others that later fixing is not terrible if the cat never goes outside. I myself have decided to wait until my kitten is 6-7 months to get her spayed because her breed is known to have issues with being put under at a young age and I have talked to both vets and breeders to come to my decision. Paediatric fixing is wonderful for feral cats or cats that can get outside, but like any surgery there are risks. My other cat Frank actually had some issues with an early neuter at 12 weeks and both the breeder and the vet who did it told me they were not going to do it again on a kitten that age (though I know the vast majority of people on here have had good experiences with early neutering). 

 

I am sure if your cat starts spraying before 8 months the vet will perform the surgery because he would have hit sexual maturity. As someone else mentioned the vet wants to wait until the testicles drop because it is a simpler surgery to preform- if the kitten starts spraying they will for sure just do the surgery right away. 

post #13 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by StefanZ View Post

 

Them doing lotsa of free advanced treatments on homeless makes them also better surgeons and generally more skilled.  They are thus more experienced and better surgeons than an average vet clinic.

 

I think also it is nice of him to admit he han discuss a somewhat earlier neutering, than his normal 8-9 months...  So he has his old rules, but he is not rigid with them at least.

 

I say, keep to him for dear life!

 

To your questions:  You can have maximal unluck, but quite few sprays immediately they become fertile. Many arent spraying the first youngling time, well behaving, and began to spray more seriously first when they are fully adult, at 14 months+.

Like someone mentioned, they spray more if there are other fertile toms or females in heat.

 

If there are none nearby, chances are good he will not spray till he is at least 10 months, with any luck - even more.

 

cleaning sprays with biological enzymes as cleaners are effective here.

Wash off the worst with 1.  "acid" water (forget for the moment what the acid is named, you can use it in food), this neuters the urine.  2. Soap water.  3. Spray on. Done.   :)

 

 

In Sweden we had long a standard of spaying at 12 months.  While it was OK for inside only cats, it was of course devastating for cats allowed to go out.  Making surely a lot of homeless...

Nowadays the standard is 6 months.

I hope they will accept the modern standard of 10v or 1+ kg.

 

 

Good luck!

Oh my, thank you! Your post was really great to read, I'm so happy I posted here!

I live in a big condo but my immediate neighbours aren't cat owners. I'm on the 4th floor and I know that two neutered male cats live on the 1st floor, and I think there might be a cat that lives in the courtyard but I'm not sure about that. So I guess my question is: how near should the other cat be to "trigger" him?

 

 

I, too, think that our vet is great! We are very lucky because it's a whole clinic of 20+ vets working around the clock: it's open 24/7 and they treat mostly cat, but all kinds of animals come in! And even with that, they give you proper visits with a lot of time to answer every little question, you have you "assigned" vet but at the same time you know there are a lot more specialized in any particular field your cat might have need of... so, I'll take the 6 months deal and I'll try not to worry! ;)

 

I loved Stockholm when I visited :) very nice place and very nice people! Your kindness just confirms it :)

 

(by acid water you mean vinegar?)

post #14 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiarabab View Post

I live in a big condo but my immediate neighbours aren't cat owners. I'm on the 4th floor and I know that two neutered male cats live on the 1st floor, and I think there might be a cat that lives in the courtyard but I'm not sure about that. So I guess my question is: how near should the other cat be to "trigger" him?

 


 

(by acid water you mean vinegar?)

Ah, no fertile cats nearby! You should do just fine!  If you want to be sure, you can change your shoes before you go into the flat. So you dont carry any smells on them, if you happened to step on some urine of a fertile cat.

 

Yes, I mean vinegar diluted with water, tx!   :)

 

 

Tx for your kind words!

 

  Good luck!

post #15 of 42

Great kitty!  In regards to neutering at 8-9 months.  The Vets at the Humane Society in Tucson, AZ will spay/neuter as young as 2 months, my Vet at 4 months.  As my screen name implies, I've had many, many cats, all indoor-only.  They've all been strays or rescues so I am unfamiliar with any issues specific breeds may have with anesthesia.  I always have them spayed/neutered no older than 5  months, with one exception that I regret to this day.  I took three 3 month old strays (2 girls, 1 boy) to a volunteer Vet for surgery.  The Vet said the boy had an undescended testicle and that I needed to take him to my personal Vet. He confirmed the volunteer Vet's evaluation and said we should wait to the testicle to descend.  In the meantime, I had adopted all 3 kitties.  I took the boy to my Vet every monthly for 4 months. Finally, the Vet said it appeared the testicle was not going to drop so we scheduled the surgery.  But he had already started spraying and he never stopped!  He never stepped one foot outside.  He would use the litter box and then go spray.  The smell was overwhelming!  He sprayed on the furniture, walls, stove, the top of the refrigerator, against the TV, the stereo speakers.  He would jump up onto the furniture and spray on artwork hanging on the wall.  He sprayed everywhere!  We both were miserable.

 

Once a cat starts spraying, it will not stop.  Males are more commonly sprayers than females.  Please, please explain your concern to the Vet and ask if he will consider neutering Fletcher before he is 6 months old.  If not, for your sake and Fletcher's, please ask a friend to take you to another Vet just for the surgery.  Then continue Fletcher's care with the Vet you've been seeing.  I love my Vet.  I'm only sorry he doesn't treat people.  : )) 

 

All bulb plants are poisonous to cats.  One of my cats plays with all flowers and knocks over the vases so much as I love plants and flowers, there are none in our house.  Also, be cautious of rubber bands, ribbon, string, yarn, Christmas tinsel and dental floss.  They can get tangled up in their intestines which can require surgery to resolve. One of my cats got his tooth stuck in a little round jingle bell (vs. a bell with a clapper) on his collar.  Another was licking at his first time collar attempting to remove it and got his lower jaw stuck under the collar.  Thankfully, both times I was home and was able to rescue them.  No more collars in our house.  One of my cats was an escape artist so I had him micro-chipped just in case he slips out unnoticed.

 

Massage Fletcher's gums with your finger, then transition to a baby or pet toothbrush.  I don't recommend minty tasting pet toothpaste because cats' sense of smell is so much keener than humans and they don't like the strong scent.  Likewise, cats generally don't like scented kitty litter for the same reason.

 

Best wishes and enjoy your new kitty. 

post #16 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by CountlessCats View Post

Great kitty!  In regards to neutering at 8-9 months.  The Vets at the Humane Society in Tucson, AZ will spay/neuter as young as 2 months, my Vet at 4 months.  As my screen name implies, I've had many, many cats, all indoor-only.  They've all been strays or rescues so I am unfamiliar with any issues specific breeds may have with anesthesia.  I always have them spayed/neutered no older than 5  months, with one exception that I regret to this day.  I took three 3 month old strays (2 girls, 1 boy) to a volunteer Vet for surgery.  The Vet said the boy had an undescended testicle and that I needed to take him to my personal Vet. He confirmed the volunteer Vet's evaluation and said we should wait to the testicle to descend.  In the meantime, I had adopted all 3 kitties.  I took the boy to my Vet every monthly for 4 months. Finally, the Vet said it appeared the testicle was not going to drop so we scheduled the surgery.  But he had already started spraying and he never stopped!  He never stepped one foot outside.  He would use the litter box and then go spray.  The smell was overwhelming!  He sprayed on the furniture, walls, stove, the top of the refrigerator, against the TV, the stereo speakers.  He would jump up onto the furniture and spray on artwork hanging on the wall.  He sprayed everywhere!  We both were miserable.

 

Once a cat starts spraying, it will not stop.  Males are more commonly sprayers than females.  Please, please explain your concern to the Vet and ask if he will consider neutering Fletcher before he is 6 months old.  If not, for your sake and Fletcher's, please ask a friend to take you to another Vet just for the surgery.  Then continue Fletcher's care with the Vet you've been seeing.  I love my Vet.  I'm only sorry he doesn't treat people.  : )) 

 

All bulb plants are poisonous to cats.  One of my cats plays with all flowers and knocks over the vases so much as I love plants and flowers, there are none in our house.  Also, be cautious of rubber bands, ribbon, string, yarn, Christmas tinsel and dental floss.  They can get tangled up in their intestines which can require surgery to resolve. One of my cats got his tooth stuck in a little round jingle bell (vs. a bell with a clapper) on his collar.  Another was licking at his first time collar attempting to remove it and got his lower jaw stuck under the collar.  Thankfully, both times I was home and was able to rescue them.  No more collars in our house.  One of my cats was an escape artist so I had him micro-chipped just in case he slips out unnoticed.

 

Massage Fletcher's gums with your finger, then transition to a baby or pet toothbrush.  I don't recommend minty tasting pet toothpaste because cats' sense of smell is so much keener than humans and they don't like the strong scent.  Likewise, cats generally don't like scented kitty litter for the same reason.

 

Best wishes and enjoy your new kitty. 

I am sorry your cat did not stop spraying after neutering but it is just not true that cats will never stop spraying once they start. The breeder I bought my kitten from does not want people fixing her cats until they are 7-8months and once or twice a cat did start spraying and none continued after the surgery. There are also behavioural issues connected to spraying and even some people with cats fixed at a young age claim their cats are spraying (but in fact it is a urination or territorial problem).  I think it is great for the OP to discuss all this with the vet and it is good to know there can be issues waiting, but it does not happen with all cats. European vets rarely do paediatric spaying (I have spent a lot of time in Europe specifically Italy myself) and there would be risks having a vet perform a surgery they have never done before.  6 months is a fine age to have the surgery done if the OP is careful about keeping him in and he would be very unlikely to start spraying at this age. 

 

Human toothpaste is actually poisonous to cats and you should only use one that is formulated for cats and even a flavourless human toothpaste would dangerous to use. 

post #17 of 42
Thread Starter 
@CountlessCat: thank you! I have some concern about living an experience similar to yours, but as Franksmom points out here in Italy things are a little different. I am asking my friends when did they spay/neuter their cats and no one did it before the sixth month of the kitten's age. I could call around to see if there is a vet who does pediatric neutering, but after reading all of your answers I'm starting to wonder if it's worth the worry honestly. Fletcher is inside only, does not live with or see other cats, and our vet offered to neuter immediatly if he should start spraying. I hope not to live your same situation! frown.gif finger crossed.
As for your other advices: flowers were thrown away, never to return smile.gif strings and stuff like that is not reachable to him and he doesn't wear a collar since I hate those things on cats and he has no way to get out smile.gif oh and we wash his teeth every other day with a wet garze, as well as groom him. Both activities are not very enjoyed, despite lots of treats and kisses.
I guess the point of my whole post was something like "I want to trust my vet on this, am I a fool?" And most answers were a very reassuring "no!", so i'll follow my istinct smile.gif after all i'll trust my kitten life with him at some point, better to start now!

(Oh, fletch is of no particular breed, even if he's parents owners swear that daddy cat is a purebred persian... But I'm pretty sure that's not the case)
post #18 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiarabab View Post

@CountlessCat: thank you! I have some concern about living an experience similar to yours, but as Franksmom points out here in Italy things are a little different. I am asking my friends when did they spay/neuter their cats and no one did it before the sixth month of the kitten's age. I could call around to see if there is a vet who does pediatric neutering, but after reading all of your answers I'm starting to wonder if it's worth the worry honestly. Fletcher is inside only, does not live with or see other cats, and our vet offered to neuter immediatly if he should start spraying. I hope not to live your same situation! frown.gif finger crossed.
As for your other advices: flowers were thrown away, never to return smile.gif strings and stuff like that is not reachable to him and he doesn't wear a collar since I hate those things on cats and he has no way to get out smile.gif oh and we wash his teeth every other day with a wet garze, as well as groom him. Both activities are not very enjoyed, despite lots of treats and kisses.
I guess the point of my whole post was something like "I want to trust my vet on this, am I a fool?" And most answers were a very reassuring "no!", so i'll follow my istinct smile.gif after all i'll trust my kitten life with him at some point, better to start now!

(Oh, fletch is of no particular breed, even if he's parents owners swear that daddy cat is a purebred persian... But I'm pretty sure that's not the case)

Actually it wouldn't surprise me if he is part Persian. His eyes and head shape give him a Persian look. The father may not have been a pure bred but he may have some Persian ancestry.

I agree you should follow your instinct. It is so hard to find a vet who cares about animals and not just money and it sounds like you found a great one.
post #19 of 42

Thanks for the feedback.  I apologize for the confusion regarding toothpaste.  The toothpaste to which I refer is minty pet toothpaste.  The flavor is unpleasant to many, not all, cats.  It seems many pet products are formulated to human preferences.  I have yet to find a pet toothpaste flavored to a cat's taste.  Any suggestions are most welcome.  The fragrance free variety of the kitty litter my cats  prefer is often sold out while the shelves are full of the Lavender, Fresh Scent and other scented varieties. 

post #20 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Franksmom View Post


Actually it wouldn't surprise me if he is part Persian. His eyes and head shape give him a Persian look. The father may not have been a pure bred but he may have some Persian ancestry.

Really? I posted some of his pictures here but feedbacks were mostly on the "no persian" side. I could send you privately the two pictures I have of papa cat, since he's not my cat and I did not take the picture myself I didn't feel confortable putting them publicly online. I couldn't care one bit if he is of persian ancestry, I'm just extremely curious of how will he look like when grows up! Also, on the specific matter of neutering, I read that persians are late bloomers so that could be good news!


Edited by chiarabab - 7/2/13 at 12:41am
post #21 of 42

Thanks for the response.  It sounds like you have all the bases covered.  I didn't know about brushing my first cat's teeth and he never really accepted it.  Hang in there, dental care and grooming will grow on Fletcher since you've started both while he is still young.  I think Fletcher is one very lucky cat to have found such a caring person to call his.  In what part of Italy do you live?

As I'm typing this my Red Tabby is lounging across both of my forearms. catman.gif Any suggestions on how to prevent my keyboard from developing fur balls?  sigh.gif  I vacuum it every few days. 

post #22 of 42
It is always hard to tell if a cat is part purebred because often many of the traits are not passed on. People on the breed thread often are very wary of proclaiming any cat a pure bred because the bast majority of cats are not any particular breed.

The modern Persian's distinctive face does not pass on with mix breeding. Fletcher does not have the modern Persian face but his head shape and eyes do look similar to a Persian. If you do a google image search for black Persian kitten he has some similarities. Domestic longhairs sometimes do look like Persians so he may just be a bit of a look a like.

If you send me his father's picture I can tell you a bit more. Did his father have papers? If he was a proper pure bred he should have had papers proving his breed. He may also have been a mix or just a look a like.
post #23 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CountlessCats View Post

Thanks for the response.  It sounds like you have all the bases covered.  I didn't know about brushing my first cat's teeth and he never really accepted it.  Hang in there, dental care and grooming will grow on Fletcher since you've started both while he is still young.  I think Fletcher is one very lucky cat to have found such a caring person to call his.  In what part of Italy do you live?

As I'm typing this my Red Tabby is lounging across both of my forearms. catman.gif Any suggestions on how to prevent my keyboard from developing fur balls?  sigh.gif  I vacuum it every few days. 

aw, thanks! Fletcher is one strong willed kitten. Luckily he's also a very heavy sleeper, so we do a bit of that stuff while he is asleep. I swear an atomic bomb could go off behind his ears and he wouldn't wake up!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Franksmom View Post

If you send me his father's picture I can tell you a bit more. Did his father have papers? If he was a proper pure bred he should have had papers proving his breed. He may also have been a mix or just a look a like.

No, he had no papers as far as I know nor he has an extreme persian face, so it's hard to tell. I'm sending you the pictures right now, thanks for your willingness to help satisfying my curiosity! :)

post #24 of 42

Regarding flowers:  roses are one of the few flowers that are not toxic to cats.  I dry flowers and make potpourri and dried flower wreaths from them.  I'm lucky in that Ritz has shown no interest in flowers--or electrical cords.  That said, I dry the flowers behind a closed door where Ritz can't get to them.

Have you thought about what to feed your precious furball?  What foods are available to  you in Italy.  (I visited Northern Italy (Alps) years ago and right after 9--11, southern Italy.  Wonderful people, scenery.)

Oh, and I've trapped-neutered-spayed-returned 35 cats in 2.5 years.  Where I live, the rule of thumb is the vet will s/n if the cat weighs two pounds (roughly 4.4 kilos) or two months old.  The vets realize that the trapper probably only has once chance to trap a cat and the vet realizes they probably only have one chance to spay/neuter the cat; they aren't going to say to me, sorry, bring him/her back in four months when he's older :)smile.gif

And your vet sounds like a keeper!

post #25 of 42
Ritz: 2.2 pounds is one kilo, so other way around wink.gif.

I think 6 months is fine for males. I would even be comfortable waiting until 8 months for most males, but 9 months would be pushing it. From what I've seen, most young males start acting "tomcat-ish" around 9-10 months.
post #26 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ritz View Post

Have you thought about what to feed your precious furball?  What foods are available to  you in Italy. 

 

 

Oh yes, I did all the research! :D Right now we are feed him high quality kitten canned food as the two main meals of the day, and we leave him some high quality kitten dry food to snack on during the day. We are rotating between a few brands since we want him to try different flavours and textures. So far he ate everything. As soon as he is neutered we plan on transitioning him to an all wet diet, and to save some money I read around that Bozita should be good. It's a swedish brand, I don't know if you have it available but I researched it everywhere including TCS, read the label and everything seems super fine according to everyone. It is a complete food, comes in various flavours, it's very low in carbs (I don't remember well right now, but it should have none) and it doesn't cost too much.

At first we were feeding him Royal Canin but after doing some research I figured that it wasn't worth the cost. Here we have a brand that is called Almo Nature and it is pretty good. Even if he is still a kitten his meals are scheduled and weighted. He is a big boy (already 2 kilos! That's about 4.4 pounds, and he just turned 3 months old!) but the vet seemed concerned about his weght... apparently he should weight a little bit more given his size. So we increased the size of his meals a bit. Oh, he also gets a little tip of plain yogurt once a day, of course without sugar of fruits added! 

I will not feed him raw because honestly as much as I can study and inform myself I'd rather have some more experience before getting into that. Also, my boyfriend (and Fletcher's daddy) is a vegetarian and he doesn't like handling raw meat... Canned food is easier for us :) 

Sorry I talk so much!! I like talking about my little kitten and not being a native speaker I'm always using a thousand words to explain every little concept... 

I'm happy you enjoyed Italy! My bf's parents live on the Alps, we are going there for part of our holidays :) Such a wonderful place, I have to agree. I live in Milan by the way.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Willowy View Post

Ritz: 2.2 pounds is one kilo, so other way around wink.gif.

I think 6 months is fine for males. I would even be comfortable waiting until 8 months for most males, but 9 months would be pushing it. From what I've seen, most young males start acting "tomcat-ish" around 9-10 months.

Thank you so much for your help!

post #27 of 42
Congratulations on adopting such a handsome boy! I'm from the USA but live in the UK now so understand the differing attitudes in cat care. I've had several male cats over the years. A vet in Scotland recommended having Pugsley done at 4 months, which I thought was young, but agreed to. During the procedure, the vet phoned to say that he could only remove one testicle safely, as the other one was too high up and there was a danger of 'ripping' him. So we decided to wait a few months in order to allow time for his testicle to descend naturally. My husband, who was NOT an experienced cat owner (this was his first) elected NOT to finish his neutering, despite all my attempts to make him see reason. Long story short, five months later we lost Pugsley-as he roamed off one night and never returned, even after months of searching and posting notices everywhere! Intact male cats WILL roam and fight over territory and females, and attempt to get out of your home daily as the need to mate is very strong. Please speak to your vet, and have your boy neutered as soon as SAFELY possible. I now have two cats, one male, one female, both neutered/spayed, and they are very affectionate and healthy. I adopted them both as adults, at one year of age, on the same day, from different homes. Neither cat had EVER had any vet care. They both have been neutered/spayed, get routine flea/worming care, are microchipped and have current vaccinations even though it is not a legal requirement where I live. I think you should stick with the vet you have for many of the reasons other posters have listed-just ensure that you get your boy neutered-as you and he will be much happier for it.
post #28 of 42

I would stay with your current vet who sounds very good ,  and  get the cat neutered around 6 or 7 months, as soon as your vet agrees.  As long as you can keep Fletcher safely confined indoors or with an outdoor cat-proof enclosure ,  and you don't have any female cats he could get pregnant,  it should be fine.   

 

  You were asking about signs a male cat is reaching puberty  ( or specifically you asked if there is a way to see it coming that he will start spraying.    I agree with Stefan that usually does not happen before 8 months and often over a year.   and is less likely to start early if he is not in close proximity to mature intact cats ( of either sex -- they spray to attract females and to warn off males) .     

 

 but re puberty signs  that usually will happen in the months before he actually starts spraying.... in case it will help,  I can mention some things.   It is a bit difficult because some of them can be signs of other things besides puberty.   but for what it's worth.... 

Most obvious physical sign is his testicles getting larger.  

As time goes by they also get  "jowls" ,  thicker skin on the neck , etc.   but  that part usually would not happen to a great extent before he is 8 months anyway. 

 

You may see him licking his penis more often ( but that is certainly not always sexual; it can be just normal hygiene,  or if done frequently it can sometimes be a sign of some urinary tract health problem.) 

  and ( if you ever even have seen it before! ) you may see it has got larger than before and also has little raised "spines" on it.   (  I am not suggesting you stalk around trying to look at your cat's privates,  but some cats are exhibitionists! )

 

 It's not only the females who "call"',     If there are female cats in heat somewhere in the area ,   a male cat is likely to call to them.    It's often a sort of crooning trilling sound  that he repeats over and over.    like the sound in this:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AXX_A5GvJ9Y

or this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ay0UDKyFpEg      I have seen some boy kittens  start this behavior even around 5 months if he smells or hears a queen.  

 

  May start humping other pets or objects or human arms or legs.   ( if it's other pets,  sometimes that is a dominance thing and does not necessarily mean he is ready to mate)

 

 Another sign is he might get more aggressive with other cats and even with humans -- for example he might start a habit of grabbing peoples arm and even lightly bite as if practicing the mating act. 

 

 If he does start the above behavior ,  you could talk to the vet  about it.  

 

It's not always true that if a cat starts spraying,  he will never stop.     I know it is awful for people who ARE in that situation with their cats.  but  most cats do stop.  I know of former studs who sprayed when they were intact toms,  but after neutering stopped and live in homes as pets and never spray.  

 

And there have been  studies that found that 80-90% of cats who sprayed stopped after being neutered,  most stopped almost right away,  the rest within a few months.   It's been a while since I read those, but  I think one study found 90% stopped and the other was over 80%.    And  I think it was an even higher rate of success for cats who had not been spraying a  long time.  

   Hopefully you will not have him even start it at all.    IF he  sprays even once , try to get the vet to go ahead and neuter him.   ( Keep in mind it is not the same thing as urinating out of the box.  In spraying it is aimed at a vertical surface.   They back up to it and quiver their tail .)

 

re food ,  I have heard people in Europe say Bozita and Almo Natur are good. 

post #29 of 42
Thread Starter 
Hi redordead, thank you for your answer! Don't worry, we didn't consider even for a moment not to neuter him. Aside from spraying, we want him to be a happy indoor cat, and we know that in order to achieve that neutering is essential smile.gif we will try to get him fixed when he's about six months old.
Anyway I wanted to reassure you that is really unlikely that he could escape from our home! So until then I feel pretty safe at least about that.
post #30 of 42
Thread Starter 
Wow maewkaew, what a detailed and informative post! Thank you very much! I will watch out for those signs!
Now that we are on topic, do you think there's any link between the size of the kitten and the age at which he will reach sexual maturity? Fletcher is growing really fast!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cat Health
TheCatSite.com › Forums › Our Feline Companions › Cat Health › Vet will neuter our cat at 8-9 months old... Isn't that too late?