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My cat's cholesterol is too high, what should I do?

post #1 of 77
Thread Starter 

This morning, I saw my 9 year old cat Hercules limping.  I quickly took him to the vet and ran blood test.  His cholesterol is 325, too high, everything else is normal.  The vet said the limping might be caused by high cholesterol, which made his blood circulation bad, plus he is too fat.

Does anyone have experience with limping cat or high cholesterol?  I'm not sure if I can trust his words cuz he is a new vet...

Does anyone know what brands of canned food has low cholesterol?   What type of food should I feed him?

 

Thanks in advance.

post #2 of 77
This is going to be a really downer post, so a warning to you in advance. I'm sorry you cat is ill!

I had a cat who started limping all of a sudden when he was 8 years old. He had cardiomyopathy (a heart condition) which caused a thrombosis (a blood clot thrown into his bloodstream), which caused lameness in his back legs. He was also overweight. While the vet checked his heart during the first office visit, he didn't hear a heart murmor. That didn't show up until about 4 weeks later, when his lameness was progressively worse.

Your post throws a lot of red flags in the air for me. High cholesterol by itself isn't going to cause him to limp. Heart problems from high cholesterol could cause a thrombosis and cause him to limp. Male cats between 8-9 years old are in a prime age for this problem, particularly if they are overweight. I would suspect that first, particularly if he is limping in his back legs.

Changing his diet to lower his cholesterol is a very strange thing for a vet to prescribe for this problem. Not that it will hurt him, but that isn't the thing that could turn things around for him quickly if he has a heart condition. My cat went downhill quickly because the initial diagnosis was that he somehow hurt himself when he jumped off of something. While we could have started him on heart medication, we didn't run enough tests during that visit to identify his real problem. By the time we identified his heart condition, the lameness was irreversible and we lost him a few weeks later.

Provided that this is a heart condition, there is medication available to treat this condition as long as you can catch it in time. High cholesterol suggests a heart issue. If your vet is very new and isn't comfortable treating your cat for this, I suggest you ask for a referral to another vet.

Please keep us posted on how he is doing?
post #3 of 77
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the reply and advice.  Hmm... This makes me very worried now.  I will schedule another appointment.

  What other symptons does your cat have?  

You mean heart condition caused high cholesterol or the other way around?  I think I'm kinda too nervous to think clearly now....

post #4 of 77
Thread Starter 

Is x ray or ultrasound needed for detecting the problem?  Or the vet only need to s hear it?

 

My regular vet will be back at night, so I will go to him.   In the meantime, I'm researching about heart condition.

Or is it possible that his joints are stiff because it is cold?  (yeah, I'm trying to comfort myself.)

post #5 of 77

OK, in the " trying to comfort yourself" arena, yes, it's possible that cold can cause a cat with arthritis to hurt more.  BUT, since the blood test must have shown high cholesterol, it sounds like there is still an underlying issue.  And my understanding is that there is a different blood test that can be run to determine if there is an issue with the heart, see http://www.idexx.com/view/xhtml/en_us/smallanimal/reference-laboratories/testmenu/innovative-tests/cardiopet-probnp.jsf?conversationId=89627&SSOTOKEN=0, plus a chest x-ray can show any abnormality.

 

I don't blame you for being nervous and looking for any way to comfort yourself alright.gif hugs.gif.  I would definitely talk to my regular Vet and if your baby needs to be put on medication, the sooner the better.  There are other folks here on this site who live with cats who have heart disease, and they are doing well cross.gif

 

 

vibes.gifvibes.gifvibes.gif

 

Keep us posted!

post #6 of 77
I really didn't want to scare you, but I did want you to take this seriously.

I didn't have a cholesterol test for my cat so I don't know whether or not he had it, nor do I know whether that triggered his heart condition. I do know that when a human has high cholesterol, they have a higher risk for heart disease. The 2 are related. Some heart conditions in cats can lead to a thrombosis, which can cause a cat to go lame in their hind legs. I was speculating a logical progression, and because I am speculating, its very important to push your vet a bit harder to get to the bottom of this. My cats only 2 symptoms were lameness in his back legs and eventually they found the heart murmor. I probably had a CBC run at the time (I usually do that) and that was normal. He's been gone for 6 years and I don't recall all the details.

On the flip side (to comfort you), it could be arthritis settling in, or he might have taken a hard landing when jumping off of something. The high cholesterol may have nothing to do with his lameness. Even more reason to get more information from your vet.

Whatever you do at this point, it might be better if you ask your food question within the Cat Nutrition forum, where people who are more knowledgable about food may be able to better answer your specific question. Some people who monitor that forum may not see your post in Cat Health.

hugs.gif to get you through this.
post #7 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsgreenjeens View Post

OK, in the " trying to comfort yourself" arena, yes, it's possible that cold can cause a cat with arthritis to hurt more.  BUT, since the blood test must have shown high cholesterol, it sounds like there is still an underlying issue.  And my understanding is that there is a different blood test that can be run to determine if there is an issue with the heart, see http://www.idexx.com/view/xhtml/en_us/smallanimal/reference-laboratories/testmenu/innovative-tests/cardiopet-probnp.jsf?conversationId=89627&SSOTOKEN=0, plus a chest x-ray can show any abnormality.

I don't blame you for being nervous and looking for any way to comfort yourself alright.gifhugs.gif .  I would definitely talk to my regular Vet and if your baby needs to be put on medication, the sooner the better.  There are other folks here on this site who live with cats who have heart disease, and they are doing well cross.gif


vibes.gifvibes.gifvibes.gif

Keep us posted!

yeah.gif I was going to post about this test - this is what caught Jcat's Jamie HCM early and probably saved his life agree.gif - x-rays in different angles along with it, will give you a great idea of how the heart is doing too agree.gif

vibes.gifvibes.gifvibes.gifvibes.gifvibes.gifvibes.gifvibes.gifvibes.gifvibes.gifvibes.gif
post #8 of 77
Thread Starter 

Thank you for the advice.  I'm still waiting for my regular vet to come back.  I noticed Hercules limping right after his nap after dinner, and then in the morning.  He still can run, the limp is only notisable when he walks.

I actually noticed in the past few months, he seems reluctant to jump very high.  He used to do summersault in the air, but after he gained weight (since last year), he couldn't land too well, so he just stopped doing it, but he never limped until now.  

 

As I was waiting for my regular vet, I rang the first vet asked him if it was possible that Hercules had heart problem.  He said He listened with his FINGERS, and he didn't hear anything major.  He seemed unhappy because he felt I questioned his diagnose. 


Edited by space1101 - 1/6/12 at 6:59pm
post #9 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by space1101 View Post

His cholesterol is 325, too high, everything else is normal.  The vet said the limping might be caused by high cholesterol, which made his blood circulation bad, plus he is too fat.

 

Does anyone know what brands of canned food has low cholesterol?   What type of food should I feed him?

 


 

What are you feeding Hercules now? High cholesterol in cats tends to be more related to high carbohydrate intake (can also indicate liver or metabolic issues, but you'd probably see some other lab results out of whack). Weight gain is also often a result of excessive carbs in the diet, so if you're feeding kibble I think it would be a good idea to switch to a low carb canned food instead. 

post #10 of 77
Thread Starter 

Sugarcatmom, he eats mostly grain free canned food and commercial raw.   He actually gained weight after quitting kibbles, I don't know why.   Do you think maybe canned food has much higher fat than kibbles?   The blood test was done about 30 minutes after he ate nature's variety rabbit canned.  I'm not sure if it would elevate cholesterol level that much....

The first vet even told me to switch to hills low fat diet....sigh...

 

 

post #11 of 77

Please excuse me for popping in for just a moment. Not trying to interrupt!

 

I had to find some answers for this problem some years ago.(I did.)   So I looked around again now to see if there was any new information available. Not really, the basic info is still the same. And, according to current info - just like the articles stated years ago - an elevated cholesterol level does not predispose cats and dogs to heart and blood vessel disease. It's different for them than it is for us humans.

 

Anyway, space 1101, I'd like to ask you, do you have a copy of the most recent complete chemistry profile and CBC (complete blood count) for your kitty? If not, please get a copy of everything for yourself as soon as possible because you will need to look at all the numbers yourself. There are several values to check/doublecheck.

 

Also, were any abdominal X-rays done to do a basic check on liver, kidneys, etc?

 

What about a chest X-ray?

 

Did your vet do a fPLI test?

 

Did your vet do any tests to check for arthritis and possible spinal problems that could cause limping?

 

Several possibilities need to be ruled out, so you need a very thorough step-by-step approach.

 

If everything checks out all right I have to agree with the vet that suggested a low-fat diet. That would be the way to go.

 

You'll find some good, basic information in the articles below and you and your vet can do what's necessary to find/rule out some of the possibilities.

(I would definitely insist on the fPLI test because that's a very important rule-out.)

 

http://www.petmd.com/cat/conditions/endocrine/c_ct_hyperlipidemia

 

http://www.nativeremedies.com/petalive/ailment/cats-dogs-high-cholesterol-remedies.html

 

Just one more thing. I would urge you to get additional help from a good holistic vet who is experienced in dealing with this problem.

 

Holistic vets (I recommend using the advanced search)

 

http://www.holisticvetlist.com/

 

post #12 of 77
Thread Starter 

Hi violet, thanks for the information.  I will try looing into holistic vets.   Is  high level of cholesterol dangerous for cats?

 

The blood test at the first vet looks normal except cholesterol.  I went to the regular vet yesterday, and did X ray for chest, lung, liver, kidney, spine, and ultrasound for heart.  Everything is normal, but we all forgot to check if he has arthritis.  I have to ring the vet again on Monday.  The problem is that he is the kind of vet who only treats life and death problem, so I wonder if he will help me with arthritis.   He even told me cholesterol level of 328 is not too bad, he would worry if it went over 400 or 500.    

I noticed that Hercules walks abit better during the day, still slowly, but his limp is obvious at night after dinner.   I tried to remember his behavior in the past few months. I remember he was getting afraid to jump too vigorously because his legs coudln't support him as well as before.  I also noticed that he walks more freely on the bed than on hard floor.   The limp happened almost overnight after one dinner nap.  

Does anyone think it sounds like arthritis?   Would cosequine help?  Has anyone experienced something like this?   


Edited by space1101 - 1/7/12 at 7:50pm
post #13 of 77
If everything in the heart, lungs, x-rays, ultrasounds, CBC, etc, is normal.... I would definitely consider Arthritis, especially since he is 9 and obese.
I would, still, do that blood test we posted..... Just to be extra sure. Is there the possibility that he pulled a ligament, or hurt himself and you didn't see exactly when it happened?

I like Hyaluronic acid for Arthritis.... I would also think about going all raw on him - it will probably help him to lose weight agree.gif
post #14 of 77

Basically a problem with cholesterol is just a sign that there is a problem somewhere that requires attention. Normally, with elevated cholesterol the first thing to do is look at the liver, kidneys and pancreas. Certain blood values, elevations, or just high-normal values can be very important clues. And a seemingly confusing combination of elevations, even if ever so slight, can point to the organ that needs help. The situation that produces these changes in the blood values doesn't have to be dire. In fact, early on it is far from life-threatening. There is plenty of time, especially for a holistic vet, to get to work and bring about improvement.

 

As I said, it's incredibly important for you to get copies of all the blood work results and go over all the blood values with a fine tooth comb, with special attention to high-normal values. Don't skip this very important step. What you need to look at is the following: BUN, creatinine, glucose, ALT, alkaline phosphatase, amylase, lipase, thyroid function. Thyroid function by itself is very important. Amylase and lipase can also give very important clues. Etc. Even more important is the result of the fPLI test I mentioned in my earlier post. Be sure to have that test done.

 

In addition to all this, the diet is also very important. Most importantly, the fat content of the diet. Some foods are much higher in fat than others. And the protein sources in the foods. For example chicken and fish might be much better choices in this situation than beef and some organ meats.

 

Essential fatty acids might be very helpful.

 

Kitty's weight. Extremely important because added weight puts extra stress on the joints. So a slow, careful weight-loss program is always important whenever arthritis is suspected.

 

Also, since food sensitivities can play an important role in arthritis, generally a grain-free diet and no potatoes can be very helpful for cats and dogs.

 

Incredibly, a high-fat diet and the food sources such a diet is coming from can also have a negative effect on arthritis, so one more reason for trying to find a diet lower in fat for your baby until everything can be sorted out.

 

I'm not sure that trying Cosequin and other remedies would the right thing to do at this point. I would not want to mask symptoms in any way, I would want to work on all the important details first and see what happens, what the results are.

 

Since you said "I have to ring the vet" this must mean you're in the UK and not here in the US. If so, the list of holistic vets we have won't be helpful to you. Please do your best to find one anyway. From what's I've read you have some excellent ones over there.

 

So, anyway, yes, definitely check for arthritis and possible disk problems to see where you are with that.

 

But keep in mind, we are talking about two different problems here.  High cholesterol is the original problem, you need to concentrate on that.  The possibility of arthritis is a whole different problem.  However, diet changes, etc, will most likely be very helpful for that as well.   

 

 


Edited by Violet - 1/7/12 at 11:19pm
post #15 of 77
Thread Starter 


Carolina, thanks for the suggestion.  I'll try to suggest cardiopet test to my vet, I wonder if that is like electrocardiogram.     It's possible that Hercules has hurt himself because he likes darting and jumping.   He walked a bit more stiff in the past 2 weeks, and the limp is very notisable at night,  He walks stiffly, but would still run when excited by something.  

I was thinking about how to get rid of those fat under his skin.    Hopefully I can find low fat commercial food as well.   I wonder if I can add some veggi in the food..

 

Violet, I'm still learning what all the blood values mean.   It sound complicated to me ATM, but I'll try to learn.  FPLI test seems to be for pancreas, I looked at the tests we have done, it says  GLU, AMYL, Ca, TBIL are related to pancreas, do I still need FPLI?  Thyroid function hasn't been done yet.  I'll suggest to my vet.  

Quote:
Originally Posted by Violet View Post

 

I'm not sure that trying Cosequin and other remedies would the right thing to do at this point. I would not want to mask symptoms in any way, I would want to work on all the important details first and see what happens, what the results are.

 

 


 

Do you mean arthritis or other joint problems might be caused by some impaired organs?      The first vet said he a cat has been obese all his life, his joints might not be worn out as badly, but my cat used to jump vigorously, and the extra weight gained in the past one year probably damaged his joints when he jumped.   Let me know what you think.  It's very painful for me to watch him walking slowly like this.   The movement is not smooth during the day, and worse at night.

 

 

 

 

post #16 of 77
The cardiopet is a blood test, by IDEXX, just like the blood tests your vet sends out, but specific - I suggest you print out that link and take it to your vet, but he/she should know about it agree.gif
Quote:
An easy-to-use blood test to help assess heart disease in dogs and cats.

Cardiopet® proBNP helps you know which hearts you need to worry about

Early heart disease detection
Cardiopet® proBNP delivers quantitative results with interpretative criteria Image PDF (73 KB) that can help you determine the severity of the cardiac disease – ultimately improving patient care through earlier detection.

Accuracy you can rely on
Count on the Cardiopet® proBNP test to deliver accurate results with canine- and feline-specific Nt-proBNP to increase your confidence in diagnosing heart disease and heart failure.

Easy to use
Easily requested as part of a biochemistry/FBC profile, Cardiopet® proBNP is minimally invasive, requiring only a simple blood sample. http://www.idexx.dk/animalhealth/laboratory/probnp/cardiopet_launch_brochure_0610.pdf
post #17 of 77

Okay, trying to go step by step here. The fPLI test is the definite test for the pancreas. Amylase and lipase values, even though they can be helpful at times, are not considered completely reliable, especially in cats.

 

Glucose – very, very important blood value.

 

Calcium – also important, but all the other values are just as important. You want to see ALT, BUN, etc. Basically,  everything.

 

Did your vet do a thyroid test?

 

On a low-fat, or relatively low-fat, low-carb diet, fat melts away. You don't even have to worry about it. It happens all on its own.

 

As for arthritis, it's a fact that a high-fat diet and, most importantly, some food sources such a diet is coming from, can also have a negative effect. This has nothing directly to do with organ function. It's more of a food sensitivity issue. A problem with the liver, kidneys, or pancreas, could, however, at the same time, cause some elevated blood values, sometimes so slight that they get overlooked. If these values are addressed before they become more severely elevated, the diet is significantly changed and holistic treatment is started, the blood values will respond by going back to the normal range. And arthritis can also respond at the same time simply because of the beneficial effects of the important diet changes.

 

With high cholesterol it is very important to check for every possible underlying cause. Because the underlying cause is the important thing. If nothing, absolutely nothing can be found, then the diet becomes the main, most important issue. And making the necessary changes is much easier than you might think.

 

Since arthritis is actually an orthopedic problem it would be wonderful if you could take your baby to an orthopedic specialist for an exam and evaluation to find out what exactly is wrong right now.

 

Also, an orthopedic specialist or holistic vet could show you some home treatments, massage, etc, for instance, that can be very helpful. (There are quite a few things one can do.)

 

Weight loss and diet change should have a tremendously beneficial effect, so please do everything you can to work with the diet.

 

 

 

post #18 of 77
Violet, you know this cat is eating a mixed diet of grain free canned and raw, right?
post #19 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by space1101 View Post

Sugarcatmom, he eats mostly grain free canned food and commercial raw.   He actually gained weight after quitting kibbles, I don't know why.   Do you think maybe canned food has much higher fat than kibbles?   The blood test was done about 30 minutes after he ate nature's variety rabbit canned.  I'm not sure if it would elevate cholesterol level that much....
The first vet even told me to switch to hills low fat diet....sigh...


As far as I know, Cholesterol tests should be done fasting this cat might not have a problem with cholesterol at all.
This might be just an arthritis problem IMHO. I would repeat the test after a night of fasting before drawing conclusions there - especially since the cholesterol is not THAT elevated to begin with IMHO.
And yeah... of course the vet will tell you that..... I would rather stay on raw, honestly.... but then it is just me agree.gif
Edited by Carolina - 1/8/12 at 9:27am
post #20 of 77
Thread Starter 

Violet, thanks for the explanation.  I'll try to get fPLI and hyroid test as well.  Now I know what you meant by masking symptons.  I'll also try to find a holistic vet.

 

Carolina, my regular vet also told me on Friday that I could fast him before I check cholesterol again if I really want.  Before I get to any conclusion, I think Hercules still needs to lose weight.  It's a burden for his joints.  Do you think 100% raw would make Hercules lose weight?   Is a wet food or raw with 6 to 9% fat considered alright?  Some canned food like weruva has 1.5% fat only.   I wonder if that is a good choice.

 

I tried to cut down his daily intake by about 2oz, but he is not happy.  I can't tell if he is hungry or he just wants to eat; he wouldn't leave his dish alone.  

 

 

 

 

post #21 of 77

 

Quote:

Originally posted by Carolina

Violet, you know this cat is eating a mixed diet of grain free canned and raw, right?

 

 

Yes. Unfortunately, in my experience, a grain-free diet, etc, doesn't automatically mean that a cat will not have out of range blood values including an elevated cholesterol level. And so I can only urge a very thorough approach that does not try to sweep the cholesterol level under the rug.

 

On the other hand I'm quite sure that if any and all underlying health problems can be ruled out the cholesterol level will respond to a weight loss program and a very carefully designed diet that avoids certain protein sources.

 

I would most definitely want to do a fasting level chemistry profile and then I would also ask my vet to help me track the cholesterol level under normal circumstances with attention to different foods and protein sources.

 

 

 

post #22 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by space1101 View Post

Violet, thanks for the explanation.  I'll try to get fPLI and hyroid test as well.  Now I know what you meant by masking symptons.  I'll also try to find a holistic vet.

Carolina, my regular vet also told me on Friday that I could fast him before I check cholesterol again if I really want.  Before I get to any conclusion, I think Hercules still needs to lose weight.  It's a burden for his joints.  Do you think 100% raw would make Hercules lose weight?   Is a wet food or raw with 6 to 9% fat considered alright?  Some canned food like weruva has 1.5% fat only.   I wonder if that is a good choice.

I tried to cut down his daily intake by about 2oz, but he is not happy.  I can't tell if he is hungry or he just wants to eat; he wouldn't leave his dish alone.  




Yes, I think it would.... What commercial raw are you feeding him, and how much? How much he weights? Has your vet told you how much he should weight?
post #23 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Violet View Post




Yes. Unfortunately, in my experience, a grain-free diet, etc, doesn't automatically mean that a cat will not have out of range blood values including an elevated cholesterol level. And so I can only urge a very thorough approach that does not try to sweep the cholesterol level under the rug.

On the other hand I'm quite sure that if any and all underlying health problems can be ruled out the cholesterol level will respond to a weight loss program and a very carefully designed diet that avoids certain protein sources.

I would most definitely want to do a fasting level chemistry profile and then I would also ask my vet to help me track the cholesterol level under normal circumstances with attention to different foods and protein sources.



No... it doesn't but your posts gave me the idea that the kitty was eating a high carbs diet and it is not the case here. I just wanted to make sure you got that.
I am not telling the OP to sweep the cholesterol issue under the rug either. But for a level that is not highly elevated, that was not done fasting - clearly, at the least I would redo it the correct way. IF there is a problem - I would go straight to the heart test FIRST. Especially because limping can be a sign of a blood clot and HCM. And that is serious. That that test that we posted will pick up easily - as well as other abnormalities of the heart.
This kitty is 9, obese.... was overweight all his life - this has joint problems all over it for me.
My opinion.FWIW.
post #24 of 77
Going back to earlier posts in this thread, in post #9, Sugarcatmom wrote

 

Quote:
 

What are you feeding Hercules now? High cholesterol in cats tends to be more related to high carbohydrate intake (can also indicate liver or metabolic issues, but you'd probably see some other lab results out of whack). Weight gain is also often a result of excessive carbs in the diet, so if you're feeding kibble I think it would be a good idea to switch to a low carb canned food instead.

 

 

And space 1101 answered:
 

 

Quote:
Sugarcatmom, he eats mostly grain free canned food and commercial raw. He actually gained weight after quitting kibbles, I don't know why.

 

 
Okay, so.......
 
For weight loss and controlling certain conditions a low-carb, low-fat diet is very important.
And the fact that kitty actually gained weight after quitting kibbles suggests there is a problem with the fat content of the present diet that needs to be addressed.
 
Also, since space 1101 wrote

 

Quote:
I tried to cut down his daily intake by about 2oz, but he is not happy. I can't tell if he is hungry or he just wants to eat; he wouldn't leave his dish alone.

 

 
this suggests there is a need for a very good, healthy fiber source that would help kitty feel satisfied. Brown rice would be one such very good, healthy fiber source. Rich in nutrients and, from what I've learned, brown rice also doesn't have the alkalinizing effect some other grains have, so it would be safer for the urinary tract. (Urinary tract health is always an important consideration with any diet.) Some canned foods contain brown rice, so I would start with looking for some of those. I would also want to see if kitty would accept a little bit of home cooked brown rice with the commercial raw. (In addition to its other benefits brown rice is also a very good food for lowering cholesterol.)
 
Cholesterol 325 is high, way over the normal range. It shows there is a problem somewhere. On a normal, healthy diet, even without fasting, cholesterol should not be above the normal range when a cat goes in for a blood test.
And there is still the question whether there is an underlying health problem here that hasn't been addressed.
 
 
post #25 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Violet View Post


 
this suggests there is a need for a very good, healthy fiber source that would help kitty feel satisfied. Brown rice would be one such very good, healthy fiber source. Rich in nutrients and, from what I've learned, brown rice also doesn't have the alkalinizing effect some other grains have, so it would be safer for the urinary tract. (Urinary tract health is always an important consideration with any diet.) Some canned foods contain brown rice, so I would start with looking for some of those. I would also want to see if kitty would accept a little bit of home cooked brown rice with the commercial raw. (In addition to its other benefits brown rice is also a very good food for lowering cholesterol.)
 
Cholesterol 325 is high, way over the normal range. It shows there is a problem somewhere. On a normal, healthy diet, even without fasting, cholesterol should not be above the normal range when a cat goes in for a blood test.
And there is still the question whether there is an underlying health problem here that hasn't been addressed.
 
 

Not necessarily IMHO - we don't know what/how much the kitty is eating..... How much the kitty weights..... How much the optimum weight is.... I wouldn't load the kitty with rice in an attempt to satisfy the kitty.... We don't know what "mostly raw and grain free diet means". We don't know how fast those 2oz were cut from his diet, and what the percentage of the food was - that can have an impact on the kitty asking for food.....

Again, the test was not done fasting - it was done 30 minutes after a meal... and we don't know how many hours after a night meal.
Kitty should fasted for 12 hours.
To me, that's moot.
Cats do not need rice.... especially overweight cats.... IMHO. Brown rice might be a great source of fiber for humans.... very nutritious.... but cats d not need brown rice IMHO dontknow.gif
IMHO, if a fiber should be given there are better options then rice.
post #26 of 77

I do believe we should leave dealing with this problem to a holistic vet who practices nutritional healing. Or perhaps even a veterinary nutritionist. We are not nutritionists, we are not qualified to give nutritional advice, decide what a cat should or should not eat based on our own personal opinions, especially since we really don't know anything about this kitty's health status. Some cats can't do without a certain amount of fiber in their diet, others can't handle fiber because of various health problems. Taking this into consideration makes me say, we really are not qualified to give specific advice regarding fiber. 

post #27 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Violet View Post

I do believe we should leave dealing with this problem to a holistic vet who practices nutritional healing. Or perhaps even a veterinary nutritionist. We are not nutritionists, we are not qualified to give nutritional advice, decide what a cat should or should not eat based on our own personal opinions, especially since we really don't know anything about this kitty's health status. Some cats can't do without a certain amount of fiber in their diet, others can't handle fiber because of various health problems. Taking this into consideration makes me say, we really are not qualified to give specific advice regarding fiber. 

Well..... Which is why I was asking questions - how much the OP fed, of what, how much the kitty weighs, and if the vet gave her an optimum weight.
I did not recommend a fiber for this cat dontknow.gif I know however, that there are fibers that can help with that, without the calories- for cats. I do have experience with it - yes, for cats. Yes, prescribed by a vet. I also know that we don't know anything about this kitty to begin with to start recommending loading him with carbs. Sure, cats do well - but does a obese kitty need it?
There are simple caloric guidelines for cats to lose weight..... including as many vets say, if fat feed a bit less, if skinny, feed a bit more.
I asked questions, because when feeding raw (which the OP feeds) and the daily feeding is 4-6oz a day, cutting back 2oz is a lot. So yes - kitty will scream for food. And yes, I am not going to say anything without knowing details.... That is not a matter of opinion.... It is a matter of informed advice. If this kitty is obese, and if it gained weight after it stopped eating kibbles, there is a reason for it - it can be eating too much. Throwing advice out there without having any idea of what this kitty eats, his caloric intake, etc, IMHO does no good....
I was asking questions - Perhaps my posts about that got lost in the thread....
There are ways that the OP can have a safe weight loss on this kitty without having to resort to a nutritionist..... She might just be feeding too much - but we don't know.
Yes, I did ask her to rerun the test too.... I think it is a sound idea. I would done the same.
Her vet is not too concerned with the levels (which was my experience with Bugsy as well - however he did not have the limping on the legs).
To the OP:
Per my vet, he only worries on a higher #.
My concern is this limping - I would definitely redo that test on fasting and see what happens..... if it is still high.... run the Heart blood test we posted just in case.... to rule out HCM.... that's the first thing I would do....
Work on getting him to lose weight heartpump.gif
I am doing the same with my Bugsy now hugs.gif
Hang in there vibes.gif
post #28 of 77

Hi, Space!

 

Just read all these posts. My thoughts, for what they are worth...

 

1) You believe your kitty is overweight and has been for a while, he gained weight when switched to his current diet (which consists of commercial canned and raw foods), and he's been limping lately.

 

2) You don't really know if cholesterol is a problem or not. Even if the numbers from the first test are accurate - and they're probably not - the second vet doesn't think they are alarming as they are.

 

At this point, I would focus more on weight than on the cholesterol issue. Get a new test done, properly, if you want, but in the meantime...

 

What, exactly, is your cat eating (brand and flavor), how much at each meal, and how many times a day do you offer meals? How much does he weigh and why do you think he's overweight?

 

Two ounces of food a day are no-where near enough food for most cats, never mind a big one, so I'm not surprised your boy complained. And cats need a comparatively high amount of fat in their diet, 25% - 35%; this isn't optional, they *need* it for proper physiological functioning. In no way would I cut down on your kitty's fat and add fiber (which cats have *no* physiological need for), most especially not in the form of such a species-inappropriate product as rice.

 

It is unusual for a cat to gain weight when switched to canned, and nearly unheard of on a raw diet. Because cats process protein directly into body repairs or energy, protein calories are never stored, and because they need so much fat to maintain basic functions, you really have to feed a LOT to make a cat gain weight.

 

So something is definitely going on here... I'm very interested is what this kitty's daily / weekly menu looks like.

 

AC

post #29 of 77
Thread Starter 

 

Thanks for the advice from you guys.  My cats used to eat science hills kibble TD (teeth formula), and they get home made meat with brown rice for treat.  They weighed alright.

After I switchd them to canned and commercial raw, their appetites became really good, and they eat alot more, all three of them, especially Hercules. They develop the habbit of begging for food.  I didn't notice they gradually gained weight since it is a gradual thing.  Hercules weighed 10.8 pound a year ago, was a agile cat, now he is 12.5, not agile.  All the people think he is obses except me, but now I do.   In the past few months, everytime he did summersault, he landed poorly, so he quitted doing it.  Hercules normally eats one 5.5oz can  and about 50g commercial raw, sometimes the other way around, they get freeze dried treat and I also add olive oil in their food.   I feed different brands of  food,  mostly nature’s variety rabbit and lamb, occasionally innova kitten,  raw food is mostly beef and lamb, plus  Nature’s variety freeze dried, wysong freeze dried.  Freeze dried food  is very fattenting.

  I was more worried about my other 2 elderly cats, but to my surprise, Hercules, the youngest, has joint problem first ( if it was arthritis).

Now I cut off 2oz canned from dinner and cut oil. 


Edited by space1101 - 1/8/12 at 9:26pm
post #30 of 77

 

Originally Posted by space1101

Thanks for the advice from you guys.  My cats used to eat science hills kibble TD (teeth formula), and they get home made meat with brown rice for treat.  They weighed alright.

After I switchd them to canned and commercial raw, their appetites became really good, and they eat alot more, all three of them, especially Hercules. They develop the habbit of begging for food.  I didn't notice they gradually gained weight since it is a gradual thing.  Hercules weighed 10.8 pound a year ago, was a agile cat, now he is 12.5, not agile.  All the people think he is obses except me, but now I do.   Evertime he did summersault, he landed poorly, so he quitted doing it.  Hercules normally eats one 5.5oz can  and about 50g commercial raw, sometimes the other way around, and I also added olive oil in their food.   I feed different brands of  food,  mostly nature’s variety rabbit and lamb, occasionally innova kitten,  raw food is mostly beef and lamb,  Nature’s variety freeze dried, wysong freeze dried.  Freeze dried food  is very fattenting.

Now I cut off 2oz canned from dinner and cut oil.   I was more worried about my other 2 elderly cats, but to my surprise, Hercules, the youngest, has joint problem first ( if it was really arthritis).


Thank you for replying.

 

This does not, however, give me enough information to make any guesses as what the problem could be. Can you please fill out the profile below?

 

Yesterday, I fed my cats like this...

 

Breakfast was _______ (brand of food, such as "freeze-dried beef") made by _________ (company who makes food, such as "Nature's Variety"). I will give the cats ______ ounces of food each.

 

Lunch was _______ (brand of food) made by _________ (company who makes food). I will give the cats ______ ounces of food each.

 

Supper/Dinner was _______ (brand of food) made by _________ (company who makes food). I will give the cats ______ ounces of food each.

 

And today, I am going to feed my cats like this...

 

Breakfast will be _______ (brand of food) made by _________ (company who makes food). I gave the cats ______ ounces of food each.

 

Lunch will be _______ (brand of food) made by _________ (company who makes food). I gave the cats ______ ounces of food each.

 

Supper/Dinner will be _______ (brand of food) made by _________ (company who makes food). I gave the cats ______ ounces of food each.

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Do you ever feed snacks? If so, what are they, who makes them and how much do you give your cats? It is *good* that you stopped giving the cats olive oil. How much of that were you feeding to them?

 

AC

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