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Nice home remedy for conjunctivitis that is working!

post #1 of 30
Thread Starter 

Hi everyone,

 

Just wanted to post this in case anyone is dealing with conjunctivitis. Mr Jinx has it pretty terribly due to a fight with another cat before we took him in. Apparently a claw hooked his eyelids but thankfully missed his pretty eye.

 

Anyway, he was given interferon because he is FIV as well, but due to other meds he needed, he isn't able to start the interferon just yet, so the vet didn't give us anything else for his conjunctivitis.

 

I read online about some home remedies, and we've been using them for two days and they ARE WORKING! So I thought I'd share in case your kitty has this too:

 

Chamomile tea with a sprig of rosemary. Brew it in purified water, keep in fridge. Lasts a week. 1 tablespoon of this and purified water (lukewarm) as an eye wash. I wash my hands with antibacterial soap and then dip my fingers in it and wash his eyelids. I also place some on my face as he loves to rub my face with his (he ends up washing it himself this way! lol). 2 or 3 times per day.

 

Apple cider vinegar (1 tbsp) and purified water (1 tbsp) rubbed between the shoulder blades. Thoroughly work into skin and fur. I do this morning and night.

 

Voila!

 

The eye will still leak, but it's running clear now. And he can open it much wider, and no crust!

post #2 of 30
Thanks for those home remedy tips biggrin.gifclap.gifclap.gifclap.gifclap.gif. Very, very glad to hear Mr. Jinx's eye is improving biggthumpup.gif You are doing a great job caring for Mr. Jinx!!! hugs.gifhugs.gifwavey.gif
post #3 of 30

Please, for your cat's sake, discontinue this home remedy.

While Rosemary is safe, Chamomile is toxic to cats.

Please, anyone and everyone, when you see home remedies online or in a book, do your research and talk to your vet.

post #4 of 30

Ok, I have two questions here:

 

1:  How do you wash his eyelids?  I can't imagine any cat holding still for that!!

 

2)  Arlyn, where did you get your info that chamomile is toxic?  I can't find anything that supports that (doesn't mean it's not true, but I've found many, many articles to the contrary, and only one that states it could be harmful IF your cat is allergic to a certain flower.

 

Oh wait, I have another question!

 

3)  Apple Cider Vinegar (& purified water) between the shoulder blades helps with the conjunctivitis?  Wow!  Does this work on humans too, do you think? 

post #5 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsgreenjeens View Post

Ok, I have two questions here:

1:  How do you wash his eyelids?  I can't imagine any cat holding still for that!!

2)  Arlyn, where did you get your info that chamomile is toxic?  I can't find anything that supports that (doesn't mean it's not true, but I've found many, many articles to the contrary, and only one that states it could be harmful IF your cat is allergic to a certain flower.

Oh wait, I have another question!

3)  Apple Cider Vinegar (& purified water) between the shoulder blades helps with the conjunctivitis?  Wow!  Does this work on humans too, do you think? 

Here is the info about Chamomile:
Quote:
Chamomile

Additional Common Names:
Manzanilla, Garden Chamomile, Roman Chamomile, True Chamomile, Corn Feverfew, Barnyard Daisy, Ground-apple, Turkey-weed
Scientific Name:
Anthemis nobilis
Family:
Compositae
Toxicity:
Toxic to Horses, Toxic to Cats, Toxic to Dogs
Toxic Principles:
Volatile oil; bisabolol, chamazulene, anthemic acid, tannic acid
Clinical Signs:
Contact dermatitis, vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, allergic reactions. Long term use can lead to bleeding tendencies.


If your pet ingested this plant, contact your local veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at 888-426-4435.*

* A $65 consultation fee may apply.
http://www.aspca.org/Pet-care/poison-control/Plants/chamomile.aspx
Now.... I think this applies if ingested...... as the kitty is obviously not having a reaction to it dontknow.gif
post #6 of 30
The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center lists chamomile as toxic to cats: Chamomile.
Quote:
Clinical Signs:
Contact dermatitis, vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, allergic reactions. Long term use can lead to bleeding tendencies.

Contact dermititis seems to imply external application.
post #7 of 30
WOW- had no idea about the Chamomile being toxic eekyellow.gif.... I think if ingested as well.

I guess it is always best to check with your vet first before trying an at home remedy...vibes.gifvibes.gifvibes.gif
post #8 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcat View Post

The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center lists chamomile as toxic to cats: Chamomile.
Quote:
Clinical Signs:
Contact dermatitis, vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, allergic reactions. Long term use can lead to bleeding tendencies.
Contact dermititis seems to imply external application.

Yep.... I agree...... The kitty in question is not having a reaction to it though.... So I don't think it is necessarily toxic to ALL cats. The ASPCA does say, though:
Quote:
If your pet ingested this plant, contact your local veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at 888-426-4435.*
Which to me, says definitely toxic if ingested. agree.gif
post #9 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Feralvr View Post

WOW- had no idea about the Chamomile being toxic eekyellow.gif.... I think if ingested as well.
I guess it is always best to check with your vet first before trying an at home remedy...vibes.gifvibes.gifvibes.gif

yeah.gif
I do use herbs for Bugsy - EVEN when they are labeled and manufactured for pets, I still take them to my vet for approval...... you just never know agree.gif
post #10 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carolina View Post

yeah.gif
I do use herbs for Bugsy - EVEN when they are labeled and manufactured for pets, I still take them to my vet for approval...... you just never know agree.gif

agree.gif Exactly - better safe than sorry...... vibes.gif
post #11 of 30

Sounds like maybe Chamomile needs to be added to the "101 harmful things" sticky at the top of this forum, 'cause it's not on it!!

post #12 of 30
Thread Starter 

Thanks for sharing that!

 

I did check with the vet and according to him it is NOT HARMFUL to cats. The extract in extremely large doses would be harmful, as would rosemary, which is why it isn't recommended that they use the oils.

 

Chamomile and rosemary are the prime ingredients in many conjunctivitis items for cats, such as this: http://www.petwellbeing.com/products/cat-conjunctivitis And I also use the same amount purified water to dilute.

 

MANY MANY sites claim that certain things are toxic to animals and though it is better to be safe, it's also important to check many viable sources, as there is simply so much information about natural remedies we don't necessarily understand.

 

As a side, rosemary and other herbs are also in many of the higher-end foods, just again, in small quantities (like garlic).

 

The conjunctivitis is just about gone! His eye is bright and clear today, so I'm giving him a rest. How I wash his eye with it is I place some on my face, since he loves to rub my face, and I make sure my fingers are VERY clean, and rub a bit of the tea/purified water on his closed eye. He doesn't love it, but he lets me. :)

 

And the ACV - no one really knows! There are some theories, one being that it detoxifies the blood stream as absorbed through the skin, and another is that when he scratches the area he then transfers the acv to his feet, and then to his eye.

post #13 of 30
Thread Starter 

Here are a couple other links to help re: safe herbs:

 

http://www.petcarenaturally.com/articles/herbal-supplements.php

 

http://www.ehow.com/list_6388501_list-safe-herbs-cats.html

 

And a vet's video how-to with chamomile:

 

http://www.petstyle.com/cats/health/chamomile-cats

 

 

post #14 of 30

Interesting discussion.

 

I've the book, "Cat Owner's Home Veterinary Handbook", and so many of the eye-related problems have the potential to lead to blindness.... it would make me nervous, I think, to treat my kitty's eyes with anything that didn't come from a vet visit or prescription.

 

But then, I'm not familiar with homeopathic remedies of any sort. So I'm watching this thread with interest.  smile.gif

 

What does everything / anyone think of the video in Mrjinx's post? Would you put a wet chamomile teabag on your kitty's eye?

 

AC

post #15 of 30
Thread Starter 

He was given Interferon for the FIV/sinus/conjunctivitis from the vet - however, he's not allowed to start taking it until a series of other meds for other things are finished. So he will be taking the vet-prescribed medication as well.

post #16 of 30
I haven't watched the video, but we work with a vet trained in holistic alternatives. If she suggested something like this, we'd do it. I do know that many herbs are used - topically or ingested - that are listed as harmful to cats for various things. The remedies listed at http://www.fivtherapy.com include some, and some that can interfere with other medication. That's why we found a vet trained in alternatives to begin with. Let's face it - many human medications are toxic for us. Chemo, one of the worst offenders, pops to mind....
post #17 of 30
Thread Starter 

So true!

 

Having an FIV kitty seems to teach you a LOT about alt therapies. And today Mr. Jinx has a big, bright eye. I can tell it isn't completely gone, but what a huge difference. Hopefully after the round of Interferon, he'll be all set.

post #18 of 30

I know this is an old thread but I was doing ever more research on the question of chamomile's toxicity for cats.  It seems all this information is relative, based on dosage and whether it's used internally or externally.  I've read that often a whole plant is labeled toxic when really only certain parts cause problems, such as the inside of an avocado pit or a certain part of the aloe plant.

 

Back to the chamomile, my cat Pushkin had an ear infection and rubbed and scratched the top of her ear partially bald.  I made chamomile tea (without the bag because that paper is so toxic - no one should allow that teabag paper in their but it's REALLY bad for small animals) and chilled it, which I then applied to the balding skin on her ear.  Within days the fur grew back!  I know that permanent fur loss can occur from rubbing the ears and was so worried.  My mother did it for her cat.  It helped her, but not as much because my mother doesn't have the discipline to be consistent in treating something that's not life-threatening.  Anyway, my point is that the chamomile seems great for skin issues.  I have also used green tea externally for similar reasons and it worked as well.  Hope this maybe helps someone -  just my two cents.

post #19 of 30

PLEASE NOTE:

 

THERE ARE TWO KINDS OF CHAMOMILE.

 

GERMAN Chamomile is safe for cats.

 

There is a related plant called "Roman Chamomile" which is toxic to cats.

post #20 of 30

Thanks so much! My cat has conjunctivitis and I'm having a hard time getting it to go away. I'm trying this ASAP!

post #21 of 30

All of this information is EXTREMELY helpful to cat owners and a big THANK YOU to all those who have contributed, including the original thread starter. clap.gif I have a kitten named Poppy that developed conjunctivitis and an ear infection.  I cured the ear infection with a homeopathic remedy:

 

1/4 cup room temp water

1/4 cup apple cider vinegar

 

Use a cotton ball soaked in this solution to gently apply to the inner ear (don't put too much pressure on the ear when applying).  Use it every 4-6 hours until the infection is cleared up.

 

Let me tell you - Poppy's ear infection was gone within FOUR treatments!!!

 

Also, garlic is NOT toxic to cats unless you're feeding it to them all of the time.  A home remedy that truly works when trying to repel fleas is to mix garlic powder in with their food - wet or dry.  It is a treatment I have used for years with my cats and is safer because there are no chemicals as there are in flea collars, cleansers, sprays and powders.  All of these chemicals can have negative effects on your cats.  I have a cat that I did use flea spray on and she has lost all of her fur from it, so be careful treating cats for fleas using any chemically based products.  Also, DO NOT treat kittens under 3 months of age with flea spray - their tiny lungs are NOT strong enough to fight the chemicals in flea spray and they can die.  I had a client who treated a litter of kittens that were 8 weeks old and they all died.  

 

As for the debate regarding rosemary, chamomile and other herbs with cats...these herbs are toxic in large quantities that have been ingested.  SOME cats will have an allergy or intolerance to topical application, but it is most commonly a toxicity related to the continual/prolonged ingesting of the herbs.  Using chamomile to treat an eye infection is NOT necessarily toxic unless your cat has a sensitivity or allergy to it....I suggest trying a skin test similar to what hair color experts caution when coloring your hair for the first time - find a spot on the cat (I would suggest the belly as it is the least furry area and usually not an area people see, as well as a fairly sensitive area).  If you notice any redness, sores, itching, weeping etc. at the test site, don't use it and wash that area to remove any residue.  If everything looks normal, proceed cautiously and just keep an eye on the cat while treating him/her.  Using certain herbs to treat common ailments in cats is not harmful so long as you use caution and common sense when doing so.  Remember that dried and powdered herbs have approximately half, if not less than half, of the potency of fresh herbs because the drying and grinding processes remove the majority of the oils in the herbs, which are where the strength of the herb lies.

 

Using human medications on cats is not recommended.  Cats are commonly poisoned by the use of digestive aids such as Pepto Bismol, Immodium, antacids, etc, as well as cold medicines.  If it's a medication you use for yourself or your kids, DON'T use it for your cat!

 

One more plant people need to be aware of as being highly toxic is the poinsettia.  Do NOT let your cat eat it because it can kill them.  The most common side effect of eating these plants is vomitting, but continued and prolonged ingestion IS deadly.  Either don't have these plants in your home or place them in areas where your cat can't come in contact with them.

 

Also - and I KNOW it's cute and funny - DO NOT LET YOUR CAT EAT CHOCOLATE!  While most cats don't die from eating it, there are certain components in chocolate that are poisonous to them.  They can develop severe diarrhea, vomitting, etc., as well as develop internal injuries that include twisting of the bowel and/or intestines.  I have seen many people feed their cats chocolate and when I've warned them about the toxic results, without fail I have been told "Oh, I didn't know!"

 

One more thing you need to be aware of if you own cats is that 'Cat Scratch Fever' is real.  Because most cats have their claws and use them to catch prey, clean themselves, cover their waste in a litter box, you can contract diseases if you are scratched by your cat.  If you play with your cat, it's recommended that you use toys - a fishing pole style toy, a laser pointer (these are NOT harmful to cats), etc.  I was scratched by a cat when treating it at the vet's office and developed a nasty infection on my face that required antibiotics.  It's not fun and it's very painful.  Be careful!

 

Someone on here mentioned that many prescription medications prescribed by veterinarians contain herbal components.  This is true.  The herbal components used are in small enough quantities that their healing properties are useful, but not toxic to cats.  

 

Lastly, the debate about spaying/neutering your cat and declawing it.  NEVER declaw your cat unless it is 100% indoor, and then only declaw the front paws if clawing furniture or people is an issue.  Any cat that goes outdoors for any period of time needs its claws for protection.  Sending a partially declawed cat outdoors can be a death sentence in that they cannot flee from nor defend themselves from predators and other cats.  Spaying or neutering your cat is a responsible cat owner job.  Many cats are needlessly abandoned or destroyed because people do not invest in this process.  Unless you have an AKC registered pure bred cat, have it fixed.  This process also aids in calming cats down and curbing their desire to escape your home in search of a companion for procreation.  It will also tame aggression in your cat if it's an issue.  Also, if you are offered microchipping or tattooing of your cat, please do so.  This aids in the return of your cat to you should it run away or become lost.  53% of cats that have been chipped or tattooed are returned to their owners whereas only 12% of cats that have no identification of this kind are.

 

I was a vet tech for many years and have learned all of this through the veterinarians I have worked with.  If you are not sure, ALWAYS check with your veterinarian before trying it!

post #22 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArcherGirl View Post

 

As for the debate regarding rosemary, chamomile and other herbs with cats...these herbs are toxic in large quantities that have been ingested.  SOME cats will have an allergy or intolerance to topical application, but it is most commonly a toxicity related to the continual/prolonged ingesting of the herbs.  Using chamomile to treat an eye infection is NOT necessarily toxic unless your cat has a sensitivity or allergy to it....I suggest trying a skin test similar to what hair color experts caution when coloring your hair for the first time - find a spot on the cat (I would suggest the belly as it Lastly, the debate about spaying/neutering your cat and declawing it.  NEVER declaw your cat unless it is 100% indoor, and then only declaw the front paws if clawing furniture or people is an issue.  Any cat that goes outdoors for any period of time needs its claws for protection.  Sending a partially declawed cat outdoors can be a death sentence in that they cannot flee from nor defend themselves from predators and other cats.  Spaying or neutering your cat is a responsible cat owner job.  Many cats are needlessly abandoned or destroyed because people do not invest in this process.  Unless you have an AKC registered pure bred cat, have it fixed.  This process also aids in calming cats down and curbing their desire to escape your home in search of a companion for procreation.  It will also tame aggression in your cat if it's an issue.  Also, if you are offered microchipping or tattooing of your cat, please do so.  This aids in the return of your cat to you should it run away or become lost.  53% of cats that have been chipped or tattooed are returned to their owners whereas only 12% of cats that have no identification of this kind are.

Thank you for all your points, and welcome to TCS! You can be sure that TCS' policy is No to all Declawing, and there are many threads here to that effect. We also aim to educate all pet owners in the advantages of spaying/neutering, both for hte individual cat and to prevent unwanted and abandoned kittens. So we look forward to your contributions.
post #23 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArcherGirl View Post

...

 

Lastly, the debate about spaying/neutering your cat and declawing it.  NEVER declaw your cat unless it is 100% indoor, and then only declaw the front paws if clawing furniture or people is an issue.  

...

 

 

Never, ever declaw your cat regardless of if it's indoor only.  And always spay or castrate it.  Spaying before the first call (heat, season) greatly reduces the risk of breast cancer, and spaying more or less gets rid of the risk of pyometra.  Castration stops males developing unfortunate habits, and their pee doesn't have the same pungent smell as that of an entire male.

post #24 of 30

Hello- I just wanted to say THANK YOU! My new kitty from the pound/adoption center had a mild case of conjunctivitis- meaning I was told a past case had mostly cleared up but it could come back. It did, I saw it develop (as opposed to it being a long-term hard case). So instead of having to leave him in the pound the whole day...without me-- to wait in line to see the free vet- which I thought would be rather traumatic since he just seemed to get comfortable with us in his new home...I tried the remedy.

 

I prepared it similarly, but with dried rosemary (organic). I used a soft cotton ball and touch to clean his eyes twice a day and a cotton ball of the ASV mix squeezed over his little shoulders and spread in some. Even after his eyes had cleared I treated him for 2 more days...now the conjunctivitis is totally gone now!!

 

Thanks VERY MUCH!

 

Charlotte

post #25 of 30

Please do NOT use Rosemary, Tea Tree and so on on your cat.  This URL is mostly about Tea Tree oil, but it has a warning about Rosemary as well:

 

http://www.messybeast.com/teatree.htm

 

Quote:

 

Essential oils which contain phenols are particularly toxic to cats and cause liver damage. These include Oregano, Thyme, Eucalyptus, Clove, Cinnamon, Bay Leaf, Parsley and Savory

 

Essential oils which contain ketones cause neurological symptoms. These include: Cedar Leaf*, Sage*, Hyssop*, Cyprus*, Lavender, Eucalyptus, Mint ,Caraway*, Citronella ,Clove*, Ginger*, Chamomile, Thyme and Rosemary (those marked * give particular cause for concern).

post #26 of 30

This works!  My cat Ginny's eye was very messy and after bathing twice with the chamomile and rosemary tea cleared right up.

 

Thanks!

post #27 of 30

This was an interesting thread. Almost any substance can be described as toxic to any organism in specific concentration or duration. Even water can kill humans - which is known as "water toxicity". Many homeopathic treatments are specifically "toxic" substances that are used in very small doses that actually elicit a medicinal response.
 

post #28 of 30

My roommates cat I think got a claw in my 5 year old cat today and I noticed he was squinting and it looked like there was some clear discharge (no crusting or yellow color yet). However this is how it started with my 4 year old cat about 4 months ago when the same thing happened...They are all indoor cats and the kitten has all of his shots but I have never had this problem until he came into the picture....

 

Anyway Rocky is a pain in the butt when it comes to treating him or getting him to the vet (he refuses to make my life easier by just getting into the carrier and it is pretty traumatic for both of us) so I am trying to be proactive about this so I maybe can skip the trauma but still help him get better. My only question is how the heck am I suppose to wash his eye lid? I read every post in this thread but still am not sure how to do this. If anyone has tips I would greatly appreciate it!!!

post #29 of 30

Yes it's toxic if digested in large amounts of the flower. I still wanted feed it too them but for external it's fine. 

post #30 of 30

why between the shoulder blades for an eye problem??

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