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Venting - I HATE the side effects of Depo-Medrol!

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
After the Depo-Medrol shot Bugsy got all quiet, doesn't want to play with Lucky anymore... He used to love playing chase and hide and seek, but no more... I did the research, and it is a normal side effect in some cats. I see that he is improving everyday, his energy is coming back, but so slowly! I can't wait until the shot is completely out of his system! I will not give this shot to him again - will definitely seek other options for his gingivitis! Sorry - just needed to vent - I am frustrated, and want my playful lover bug back!
post #2 of 26
I hate that shot also and Coco will never have it again either.
I am glad your cat is getting more active.
It caused some of her bladder problems.
post #3 of 26
There are dangers with this drug so be careful. About the gingivitis, try unprocessed honey. Make sure it is the unprocessed kind though (health food stores carry it) or a beekeeper would have some. Rub small amounts on the gums twice daily. It really works wonders. You can also give probiotics to help with the immune system weakened by the shot.
post #4 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hissy View Post
There are dangers with this drug so be careful. About the gingivitis, try unprocessed honey. Make sure it is the unprocessed kind though (health food stores carry it) or a beekeeper would have some. Rub small amounts on the gums twice daily. It really works wonders. You can also give probiotics to help with the immune system weakened by the shot.
Thanks - yes, I know there are dangers to this - mostly when used long term though, which is not what I am planning to do... I was going to keep him on it until I get a job and can take care of the problem in another manner, but I can't stand to see him like this, and will do all I can to keep him off of it.
post #5 of 26
post #6 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Violet View Post
Thanks - I will research that... However his type of gingivitis is not easily treatable... It is immune mediated gingivitis, which pretty much means he is allergic to his own teeth. There are two treatments that could work: steroid shots for life (not an option for me, due to side effects), or full mouth extraction, which is likely what I am going to pursue, depending on the results of the biopsy. With Depo-medrol his gums are no longer inflamed, but the side effects of long term use could be very serious.
I have him on transfer factor to regulate his immune system, and L-Lysine. I will see how long he will hold up. As soon as I get a job I will take him to get his biopsy, and take the results to the dentist. This will be the thrid vet involved in the issue...
post #7 of 26
More info:

http://www.vetinfo.com/cteeth.html


Quote:
lymphocytic/plasmacytic gingivitis or plasma cell stomatitis (plus other variations of these names)
this condition may be related to calicivirus infection but seems to be an immune mediated disorder in most cats. High gamma globulin levels in the blood stream are supportive of a diagnosis of this condition. It is postulated that some cats are sensitized to their own teeth and removal of the teeth behind the canines (cuspids) will cure this condition in approximately 60% of cats. Oral corticosteroids, teeth cleaning on a routine basis, removal of teeth with odontoclastic lesions (holes in the enamel similar to cavities), other immunosuppressive medications (cyclosporin is currently being used) and sometimes antibiotic therapy are the standard treatments and are successful in a large percentage of cats. A small percentage (<20%) of cats seem to respond to bovine lactoferrin administration for this problem. It is pretty safe to use this so we have tried it several times and our results seem to match the
20% figure this condition tends to cause signs that clients think of as a sore throat, so I would be most concerned that this is the problem for Sam but the best way to try to get a diagnosis is by biopsy an affected area of tissue. This can be done at the time of teeth cleaning. This can be a very frustrating condition.

And again, strictly because of all the extra info on that web site:
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/P...tomatitis.html

Try to take some time for reading because it takes a long time to look at articles (there are so many on gingivitis) and find the info you really need, info that will be helpful in your particular situation.
Also, whatever is causing your baby's gingivitis, using CoQ10 will not hurt. It can only help. So don't think it's not worth trying.

The other thing is, if, suppose extractions really become unavoidable, you should start with the teeth that are causing the worst problems. You may find that removing those teeth is enough to solve the problem.
post #8 of 26
Depo-Medrol, Metacam, Buprenex, and Covinia are all on my list of "use only in case of last resort" drugs because I don't like the effects they have on my kitties, or I don't like the potential side effects. I have that on file at my vet's office, but I also tell them every single time I take my cats in and they want to give some kind of shot. I also have it in big bold red letters on their carriers, just in case I'm not the one taking them to the vets, as my DH isn't as likely to remember these things during a trip to the vet.

Stephanie
post #9 of 26
So can anyone give me the short version on why Depo Medrol is bad? My cats have been getting this shot on and off for years for various reasons. UTI's, especially. I know the vet said long term was not good, but occasionally would be okay. Is this true?
post #10 of 26
Poor Bugsy! I hope he is back to his normal self soon and playing with Lucky
post #11 of 26
Quote:
Originally posted by threecatowner
So can anyone give me the short version on why Depo Medrol is bad? My cats have been getting this shot on and off for years for various reasons. UTI's, especially. I know the vet said long term was not good, but occasionally would be okay. Is this true?
Yes. Two or three injections a year are safe. You can see they are safe when you check your cat's blood work results.

Detailed info about steroids:
http://www.newmanveterinary.com/steroids.html

Effect of steroid shot on heart disease:
http://www.justanswer.com/questions/...roid-injection

Problems from long-term use:
http://www.crvetcenter.com/corticoids.htm
post #12 of 26
Violet, I read through the links somewhat quickly, but I didn't see specifically mentioned anywhere the potential for diabetes mentioned with long term use of depo medrol. That is a major concern.

ThreeCatOwner: just FYI, depo medrol is a long acting steroid, as opposed to something like prednisone, which is short acting.

Depo Medrol is keeping our Tuxie alive. He was receiving two shots a month at first. But he received pretty frequent injections for the past four years. Thankfully, we've been able to keep stretching out the amount of time inbetween shots. His last one was back in - last July, I think!!!!!!!! But use of depo as much and as frequently as Tuxedo was receiving would have definitely revealed any heart problems he had - thankfully, those didn't exist. Thankfully (other than increasing his appetite) the only side affect was him being VERY active and slightly more aggressive than usual for about the first week after receiving his injection. ...But it should be used like that only as a last resort.

Carolina: for Bugsy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Laurie
post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally posted by LDG
Violet, I read through the links somewhat quickly, but I didn't see specifically mentioned anywhere the potential for diabetes mentioned with long term use of depo medrol.
http://www.crvetcenter.com/corticoids.htm

Quote:
42) secondary disorders: pancreatitis, hepatic lipidosis, Addison's disease, diabetes mellitus, gastrointestinal ulceration, lipidemia, depression, lethargy, weakness, vicious behavior, viral and bacterial infection

http://www.newmanveterinary.com/steroids.html

Quote:

Potential Adverse Effects of Inappropriate (potency, dose, route of administration, frequency and/or duration) Corticosteroid Therapy


1 "Iatrogenic" Hyperadrenocorticism....similar to Cushing's Disease
increased appetite


increased thirst (and in frequency of urination)

suppression of the immune system: increased incidence of infections including skin, urinary tract, respiratory tract

poor wound healing, tendon, ligament and joint abnormalities

dull/dry hair coat or hair loss, dry, thin skin that bruises readily

decreased muscle mass and tone...(weakened abdominal muscles may result in a "pendulous [pot-belly] abdomen"); muscle pain, stiff gait, rigid limbs (may mimic a hip or other joint disease)

panting

vomiting and/or bloody diarrhea, ulcers due to:

1 a. decrease production of protective gastointestinal tract lining

2 increased irritation from stomach acid secretion

enlarged liver/impaired liver function

thromboembolus (inappropriate blood clot...can suddently impair blood flow to any organ system with potentially dire consequences)

hypertension (elevated blood pressure)

diabetes

pancreatitis

osteoporosis

changes in genital / reproductive organs

hypothyroidism

behavioral abnormalities including depression, aggression/ rage, mania, hyperactivity
post #14 of 26
PS: when you get to the part I quoted from the second article
http://www.newmanveterinary.com/steroids.html
the font size is so small it's very easy to miss something.
post #15 of 26
The long lists were just overwhelming!

I just know that's what our vet has been most concerned about with our kitty.

Thanks.

Laurie
post #16 of 26
I had to get Zoey a steroid shot a few weeks ago and she is now starting to be herself again. The vet gave her a cocktail steroid shot. One was for quick results and the other long lasting. She was grouchy and not playing.
post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally posted by LDG
The long lists were just overwhelming!
They are! And, in the second article, those leaves in the background are no help either. They make those tiny letters even more difficult to read.
post #18 of 26
Thread Starter 
yey! They are playing again! They were just playing chase right now, and play-fighting/wrestling!!!! I am so happy - my boy is coming back to life!
post #19 of 26
Great news!

Is he still taking the ClinDrops?
post #20 of 26
Quote:
Thanks - I will research that... However his type of gingivitis is not easily treatable... It is immune mediated gingivitis, which pretty much means he is allergic to his own teeth. There are two treatments that could work: steroid shots for life (not an option for me, due to side effects), or full mouth extraction, which is likely what I am going to pursue, depending on the results of the biopsy. With Depo-medrol his gums are no longer inflamed, but the side effects of long term use could be very serious.
I know what you're going through. My sister took in a stray with the same problem. They just took all of his teeth out because ultimatley his body was going to get rid of them. His mouth is a lot happier now.

I have to say my cat has never been lethargic but he always has a voracious appetite afterward. He gets a shot about once a year or less if his itching on his ears/face is really bad. I know it's kind of playing russian roulette with him because they can become diabetic and alla that jazz, but I would rather keep him comfortable and steroids work the best for him unfortunatley.
post #21 of 26
[quote=LDG;2593681]ThreeCatOwner: just FYI, depo medrol is a long acting steroid, as opposed to something like prednisone, which is short acting./QUOTE]

Thank you, LDG. I thought I'd heard diabetes mentioned in ref. to these shots somewhere during my thousands of trips to the vet.
post #22 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Violet View Post
Great news!

Is he still taking the ClinDrops?
Thanks for asking - since the vet had told me to give it for 7-10 days, I decided to stop it on Sunday, which was the 7th day. I wanted to spare his system of too many meds. It also gave him diarrhea, which I didn't like it at all.
post #23 of 26
In case you ever have to use this medication again, two good options you might want to remember. The injectable form, which is so much easier on them there is just no comparison, and Clindamycin pulse therapy.

Are you giving him a probiotic? (If not, this would be the perfect time to put him on one.)
post #24 of 26
To all the threads about using CoQ10 for this, I cannot stress enough how this has helped my girl. Dharma has been living with FeLV for over 8 years and stomatitus has taken its toll. I had all her teeth removed when she was not even three yet. Just recently she has started heading down hill again, unfortunately. With great advice from my home vet and many, many hours of internet research, I believe we are on a path of management. CoQ10 in combination with other supplements have worked incredibly. Even the switch to a raw meat diet has helped. I have just up'ed her dose of CoQ10 to 120mg a day - I have read that 200mg twice a day can be given. If anyone would like to chat more or share ideas, thoughts, breakthroughs (that you cannot get from the vet at the office down the street) hit me up.
post #25 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dharmas Dad View Post
To all the threads about using CoQ10 for this, I cannot stress enough how this has helped my girl. Dharma has been living with FeLV for over 8 years and stomatitus has taken its toll. I had all her teeth removed when she was not even three yet. Just recently she has started heading down hill again, unfortunately. With great advice from my home vet and many, many hours of internet research, I believe we are on a path of management. CoQ10 in combination with other supplements have worked incredibly. Even the switch to a raw meat diet has helped. I have just up'ed her dose of CoQ10 to 120mg a day - I have read that 200mg twice a day can be given. If anyone would like to chat more or share ideas, thoughts, breakthroughs (that you cannot get from the vet at the office down the street) hit me up.
1. No online advice can replace direct veterinary intervention. If you suspect that your cat may be ill, please contact your vet immediately. You are welcome to look for advice in the health forum while waiting for that appointment, but never delay proper veterinary care waiting for Internet advice. Remember that cats, and especially kittens, are very adept in keeping pain to themselves and delaying treatment may cause irreversible damage.


Also please take note of the LAST post DATE
post #26 of 26
I just want to add that following advice from non-veterinary persons on the internet is not recommended. I personally am wary of veterinarians that offer advice online. Nobody, IMO, can diagnose your animal without seeing them and examining them.

Even things like dewormers and flea treatments should not be taken lightly and should be obtained from a vet. These products sold online and over-the-counter have been the cause of death in some animals so please use common sense when caring for your pet.
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