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Cat vaccines can lead to cancer! - Page 2

post #31 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sar
Please do remember that this is an old thread - I linked to it to display that there are significant differences between the vaccines and protocol used in the US and other countries.

Yola is from the UK and I know that we have a different vaccine.
I think the UK is way ahead of the US!
post #32 of 45
Zissou had her two kitten shots and then just the rabies, and from now on will only get the rabies--it is required by law and if she got out without a current rabies tag she can be "destroyed" at the discretion of the city if there are rabies cases. So I think it's worth the risk, since I am pretty sure this city has a large problem with stray / feral colonies and also that they don't do anything as humane and sensible as TNR and such, if you get my drift.

I have always heard that the FeLeuk shot has the highest risk. Is that true? That is one reason she hasn't gotten it, just tested for it. Also, she got her kitten shots in the scruff and her rabies in the leg. Was there anything to that?
post #33 of 45
My vet is still recommending the yearly shots, except the rabies is every three years. The reason is my cats live outside, confined in a fence area in my back yard. We have had coons to did under the fence and come in the yard. They do it when the pecan tree is putting out the nuts and the coons love to eat them. Anyway, my cats could get nose to nose with another cat through the chain link fence although we never see cats here in the yard. But my vet says for my cats the right choice is the yearly booster. I welcome opinions from anyone who read this.
post #34 of 45
I think we know the vaccination risks when we chose to vaccinate our cats.

I think everything leads to cancer these days, or so people say.

(I realise this is an old thread)
post #35 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by WellingtonCats
I think we know the vaccination risks when we chose to vaccinate our cats.

I think everything leads to cancer these days, or so people say.
My previous cat, Mittens, was an indoor cat. I became her mummy when I met my husband (she was his cat). Apart from when he got her, she was never vaccinated. She died last year aged 15 years from cancer of the liver. Now, it could be that we were just very lucky with her (i.e. that she didn't catch any infectious diseases) but who knows?

I bought Bella and Cinders from a breeder and they came to me already vaccinated for the year. The decision I will have to make later is whether I will continue to vaccinate or not. The girls are also indoor cats.
post #36 of 45
I just started to vaccinate my cats 3 years ago. I never did before and I have never had a cat get sick and die from anything. I am starting to wonder why I vaccinate at all. This is the site I printed out for my vet

http://www.winnfelinehealth.org/heal...uidelines.html

In my opinion kittens and pedigreed cats are the ones who will benefit the most from vaccinations.
post #37 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pui Hang
My previous cat, Mittens, was an indoor cat. I became her mummy when I met my husband (she was his cat). Apart from when he got her, she was never vaccinated. She died last year aged 15 years from cancer of the liver. Now, it could be that we were just very lucky with her (i.e. that she didn't catch any infectious diseases) but who knows?

I bought Bella and Cinders from a breeder and they came to me already vaccinated for the year. The decision I will have to make later is whether I will continue to vaccinate or not. The girls are also indoor cats.
I just wanted to go off topic here for a minute to tell you how beautiful Bella and Cinders are.
post #38 of 45
Thank you Yosemite! Bijou and Mika are very beautiful too!
post #39 of 45
Hmm, might be an old thread but certainly interesting. I have never heard of these cancers before joining this site, it never comes up on the UK site I am a member of. Mine were vaccinated for the first time last year - meant to get it done when I started fostering, but things happened. The locum vet who gave them the first jab tried to push the FeLV jab on me without even mentioning testing them for it. I had already had some advice that it can cause nasty side effects (my CP branch know of kittens who have died from it) and that if it is an older cat (mine were roughly 13 and 10 at the time) then it is pointless as they will have their own immunity (from a conference CP went to) - she tried to tell me that she hadn't seen an adverse reaction in 8 years and that them getting it would be worse but I stood my ground. Their boosters are due in Apr though, so i have to decide if they will be done - Pebbles is insured and part of the condition is that she is vaccinated against it, but I will take the chance and pay if anything does happen.
post #40 of 45
Honestly, the chances of having such a side affect are VERY rare.
I think that I'd rather take THAT chance then hope that my cat will simply not catch anything bad.
post #41 of 45
I remember reading a reader's letter in a cat magazine a couple of years ago about a lady who lost her cat to VAS. I've not heard of it since but then again, it wasn't until recently that I have had time to look at cat forums and cat magazines again. Now I'm not saying that it is prevalent in the UK or anything but there is one known case
post #42 of 45
the vets i work with recomend giving vaccs on the thigh so that if the cat develops vas they can remove the limb if nessary. with that being said, in the close to 6 years working in veterinary medicine, i have only seen this twice.

its rare and what would you rather have, a cat current on all vaccines with a slim chance of developing vas or a cat who comes down with a preventable disease?? its cheaper to keep vaccines up to date
post #43 of 45
I still don't trust the FeLV jab enough to risk it on my cats, plus Ginger was a stray for at least 3 years so I think he has a good immunity. Plus I was bothered that the vet who tried to push it on mine didn't even suggest getting them tested first - Pebbles might have been tested 3 months before, but she had been going out since then.
post #44 of 45
I have read that many vet schools in this country have started teaching a protocol for boosters every three years after the one year boosters. This is so new though that most vets are giving the annual boosters. I am currently looking for a new vet for other reasons and that is one of the things I am looking for. I have medical insurance that covers twelve of the most common major problems in indoor cats. They don't have a specific timetable for vaccinations but they do require that they have had all vet recommended vaccinations. The vets in this area have made the leukemia vaccination optional and not recommended for indoor cats. The rabies vaccination is governed by state law, luckly Ohio only requires it every three years and that is how often vets in this area give it.
post #45 of 45
We give vaccines as far down the leg as possible, in case cancer does occur. It's easier to amputate a leg than try to get it out of the shoulders. We do not do leukemia unless they go outside. My own cats are only vaccinated every 3 years for distemper and rabies only.
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