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HELP! I can't figure out how to thread this needle!

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
Uhhhhh! I hate sewing! I have been trying to thread a needle for the past 5 minutes with absolutely no luck whatsoever. I'm trying to sew little Kojak's banana back together since the doggies chewed it up. I even found yellow thread and everything and was going to restuff it with some more catnip....but that ain't gonna happen if i can't even thread a needle! I can sew i promise- i just can never seem to thread a needle well. I've tried spraying hair spray on the thread, putting a little lip gloss on there you name it to make it thread easier, but it's juts not working Any ideas?
post #2 of 24
I always just grab it really close to the end and hold it up where I can see it (close to my face!) and then work it in.... Make sure the end is blunt too, not frayed with fibers.
post #3 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by StarryEyedTiGeR View Post
Uhhhhh! I hate sewing! I have been trying to thread a needle for the past 5 minutes with absolutely no luck whatsoever. I'm trying to sew little Kojak's banana back together since the doggies chewed it up. I even found yellow thread and everything and was going to restuff it with some more catnip....but that ain't gonna happen if i can't even thread a needle! I can sew i promise- i just can never seem to thread a needle well. I've tried spraying hair spray on the thread, putting a little lip gloss on there you name it to make it thread easier, but it's juts not working Any ideas?
Do you have spray starch? You can spritz the end of it.

Also, you can use a bit of water and dry it out... it should make it stiffen.
post #4 of 24
I usually just stick the thread end that I want to go in the needle in my mouth and wet it and then pinch that end a little to get it as thin as possible. Then it takes me a few tries to do this.
post #5 of 24
Have you tried bending the thread so that the cut end doesn't have to got through the eye?

Also, cutting the end of the thread at a diagonal helps.
post #6 of 24
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys! I think i got it now! (after about 8 minutes of cursing at the darn needle!) i think it was hard because my eyes keep weirding out when i try to look at it really close (i'm soo blind without contacts, but even with them in my astigmatism will act up!) so i couldn't focus on it very long. I FINALLY got it! I hope it just lasts I don't get it- i can thread the needles(granted their curved and the thread is stich thread) at the shelter all day long to stitch up after spay/neuters and do a good job- but ask me to do something domestic like that at home with a regular needle and thread and i'm just aweful at it Did i mention Colin is the one with the sewing machine around here- not me....
post #7 of 24
If the thread keeps fraying then you may have cheap thread. I've became picky about thread brands over the years because the cheap ones fray and drive me nuts.

Since you always have problems threading, when you buy needles again (and get a decent brand if you can) check the eye and needle size. Get one that's easier for you to see the eye on. There are also easy thread needles, but I don't really like those. The thread can pull out of the eye and the eye is a bit too large for some fabric.

Last but not least, get a pack of needle threaders!
post #8 of 24
Thread Starter 
Nooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo!!!! The thread broke Stupid thing!!! I was doing ok- sewing my first stitch...and i guess the thread was too thin and the banana fabric too thick because it broke! If those dogs tear this up again after i sew it i'm gonna ring their necks! I'm gonna try and thread this again!
post #9 of 24
You might want to double up the thread and tie a knot at the end. That might help with the thickness of the banana.
post #10 of 24
Thread Starter 
Thanks again guys! I was able to FINALLY thread it again and get the largest tear sewed up. I'm about to start on the second one then i think it'll be done. It looks like the type of banana Frankenstein would enjoy MY eyes are absolutely killing me!!! UHHH! I'm definitely going to go out and get those easy threading needles sometime!
post #11 of 24
Thread Starter 
It's done!! It's done!! It's done!!!!!!!! It looks aweful! But hey, i sewed it just the same!!! I saved the nana!
post #12 of 24
Nikki, I'd suggest a needle threader too if you have alot of problems with it.I sew alot with appliques and all, so I HAD to buy one for my poor eyes too.
post #13 of 24
They already beat me to telling you about the needle threader. Very neat little gadgets. And they are great when you are doing alot of sewing.
post #14 of 24
I'm late to this, but for those who may still read it: I do needleweaving with beads for jewelry, and it requires needles with tiny little eyes to fit through the tiny little bead holes... so threading is very hard. The tricks I've learned are:

1. Use the smallest, sharpest scissors you can find to cut the thread -- gives you a much cleaner cut.

2. Keep some beeswax on hand (not "thread conditioner," but genuine good old-fashioned beeswax) and slide the end of the thread across it a time or two before you trim it off and pinch it flat. That will smooth out the fuzzies that make the thread stick in the needle's eye.

3. Hold the needle so there's a dark background behind it -- the light glinting on the metal will make it easier to see the eye.

4. For some reason, it seems to be much easier to thread the needle if you hold the thread still and move the needle onto it. I can't imagine why... but it really seems to help.

Also... whenever I have mending to do, I use button-and-carpet thread -- it's a little heavier and will take a lot more tension than even two strands of regular thread.

And I never, never buy those little kits with a dozen colors of thread on tiny spools -- the thread is so cheap and fragile that it's just pointless.
post #15 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolPetunia View Post
I'm late to this, but for those who may still read it: I do needleweaving with beads for jewelry, and it requires needles with tiny little eyes to fit through the tiny little bead holes... so threading is very hard. The tricks I've learned are:

1. Use the smallest, sharpest scissors you can find to cut the thread -- gives you a much cleaner cut.

2. Keep some beeswax on hand (not "thread conditioner," but genuine good old-fashioned beeswax) and slide the end of the thread across it a time or two before you trim it off and pinch it flat. That will smooth out the fuzzies that make the thread stick in the needle's eye.

3. Hold the needle so there's a dark background behind it -- the light glinting on the metal will make it easier to see the eye.

4. For some reason, it seems to be much easier to thread the needle if you hold the thread still and move the needle onto it. I can't imagine why... but it really seems to help.

Also... whenever I have mending to do, I use buttonhole-and-carpet thread -- it's a little heavier and will take a lot more tension than even two strands of regular thread.

And I never, never buy those little kits with a dozen colors of thread on tiny thimbles -- the thread is so cheap and fragile that it's just pointless.

Oh excellent tips!!!! Thankyou!!! I am going to save all of these tips everyone's posted for my next attempt at sewing! Thanks again!!! (oh i was using the cheap thread the other day of the little thimble- maybe that's why it kept unraveling? what brands do you suggest using as an alternative?)
post #16 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by StarryEyedTiGeR View Post
Oh excellent tips!!!! Thankyou!!! I am going to save all of these tips everyone's posted for my next attempt at sewing! Thanks again!!! (oh i was using the cheap thread the other day of the little thimble- maybe that's why it kept unraveling? what brands do you suggest using as an alternative?)
I work in a fabric store, so I can recommend a few... don't buy 'off label' or Coats & Clark... C&C USED to be good thread, but they've just gone down the toilet the past five years or so... Hmmm what's good... Gutermann, Mettler, etc... yes, they do tend to be a bit more $$, but unless you're going to be doing a LOT of sewing or mending, just stick to small spools of the good stuff... and pick up a needle threader... there's several styles out there now (I know, because i see them at work)

For mending things that need to be sturdy, get upholstery, or craft thread... a bit studier. nylon, not cotton... IMHO. cotton frays and snaps easier, I've noticed.

I have a bunch of Gutermann thread... MUCH better than C&C. the expensive stuff is King Tut quilting thread... holy cow it ain't cheap. But quilters at our store buy plenty of it...

My 2 cents...
Amanda
post #17 of 24
Thread Starter 
Thanks Amanda! I will definitely have to write down your suggestions and take them with me next time i go to the craft store I figure i'll just get one or two small basic threds (the kinds you recommended) and a needle threader for just simple things around the house like fixing buttons/etc Thanks again!!
post #18 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolPetunia View Post
I'm late to this, but for those who may still read it: I do needleweaving with beads for jewelry, and it requires needles with tiny little eyes to fit through the tiny little bead holes... so threading is very hard. The tricks I've learned are:
Ah, bead needles. Threading those can be torture, especially the smaller diameter eyes, such as the ones for tiny hex seed beads.
I second getting very sharp scissors, fiskers usually keep their edge for a long too. Do not use them for anything other than thread and cloth.

I forgot all about beeswax!

I'm not sure I've seen the Gutermann thread? normally I use coats and clark, which is fine for hand sewing. Sewing machine really needs something stronger. *will have to go thread hunting in the future*

Years ago DH's parents were cleaning out their garage and found an old sewing box with thread in it. Some is so old that it was before C&C joined/changed names. Still fairly strong for it's age... definitely higher quality back then.
post #19 of 24
A needle threader and a GOOD thimble... Ohh I have been doing this since about age 5 common over I will happily do it for ya
post #20 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by StarryEyedTiGeR View Post
Thanks Amanda! I will definitely have to write down your suggestions and take them with me next time i go to the craft store I figure i'll just get one or two small basic threds (the kinds you recommended) and a needle threader for just simple things around the house like fixing buttons/etc Thanks again!!
I also recommend getting a pack of good sewing needles, as for thread colors: always keep black, white and a few other shades handy. If you think you'll be repairing things like that banana often, get some to roughly match those things.

Quote:
Originally Posted by strange_wings View Post
I'm not sure I've seen the Gutermann thread? normally I use coats and clark, which is fine for hand sewing. Sewing machine really needs something stronger. *will have to go thread hunting in the future*

Years ago DH's parents were cleaning out their garage and found an old sewing box with thread in it. Some is so old that it was before C&C joined/changed names. Still fairly strong for it's age... definitely higher quality back then.
Gutermann has been around for some time, but my guess is only starting to show itself in the US. I never saw it before working at the store... they have smaller spools, usually in 100, 250 and 500 meter options...some in 1000 meter option as well, but those are usually the very basic colors.

I have some old C&C thread, good stuff... but compare the old stuff to the newer C&C... the new stuff is ... fuzzier. that's one way to tell quality... if it's brand new and it's kinda fuzzy looking... not good... it'll break much easier. I had some thread last Christmas that came with a kit... only reason I used it was because it was the right color and I was desperate. Man... I got so frustrated... it kept breaking and breaking... I was about ready to scream... repeatedly... then I decided to try a sample piece of cloth with my C&C... it also kept breaking... thought it was the machine... nope... finally got some Gutermann and it never broke... I won't even LOOK at C&C now...
post #21 of 24
For next time, remember that thread has a "nap." It is smooth if you run your fingers across it one way, rougher if you run them the other way. You want a very clean cut, too, on the end that will go smoothly through the needle.

I hope that makes sense!
post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by SwampWitch View Post
For next time, remember that thread has a "nap." It is smooth if you run your fingers across it one way, rougher if you run them the other way. You want a very clean cut, too, on the end that will go smoothly through the needle.

I hope that makes sense!

It sure does! And I didn't know that... thanks so much!
post #23 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharky View Post
A needle threader and a GOOD thimble... Ohh I have been doing this since about age 5 common over I will happily do it for ya
Hehe next time i'll mail it to ya! That poor banana looked pretty pitiful before i sewed it, still lousey after i sewed it, and now it just looks aweful because Fosters keeps playing with it- he thinks it's his baby it's really cute! So i'm going online/to pet stores to try to find him a cloth doggie banana toy! He'll love it!

Quote:
Originally Posted by RubSluts'Mommy View Post
I also recommend getting a pack of good sewing needles, as for thread colors: always keep black, white and a few other shades handy. If you think you'll be repairing things like that banana often, get some to roughly match those things.
Haha i'll definitely have to get a few staple colors - black, white, navy blue, and i'm thinking a yellow for that poor banana!

Quote:
Originally Posted by SwampWitch View Post
For next time, remember that thread has a "nap." It is smooth if you run your fingers across it one way, rougher if you run them the other way. You want a very clean cut, too, on the end that will go smoothly through the needle.

I hope that makes sense!
Great tip! Thankyou! I had no idea
post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by StarryEyedTiGeR View Post
Thanks guys! I think i got it now! (after about 8 minutes of cursing at the darn needle!) i think it was hard because my eyes keep weirding out when i try to look at it really close (i'm soo blind without contacts, but even with them in my astigmatism will act up!) so i couldn't focus on it very long. I FINALLY got it! I hope it just lasts I don't get it- i can thread the needles(granted their curved and the thread is stich thread) at the shelter all day long to stitch up after spay/neuters and do a good job- but ask me to do something domestic like that at home with a regular needle and thread and i'm just aweful at it Did i mention Colin is the one with the sewing machine around here- not me....
btw, i find it much easier to thread needles with no correction at all... but i'm nearsighted.
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