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Moving from Suburban to Rural

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Hello,

Our cat Peaches is a little over 5 years old. This summer, we plan on moving
from the suburbs of Chicago to a very rural area.

Peaches is an outdoor cat. She always has been. She's got lots of
outdoor/hunting skills.

I have read a few stories that when people moved with their outdoor cats
and let them out, they ran back to the old house (even if its many states
away!!)

Is this true? Will Peaches have to become an indoor kitty when we move?


Thanks,
Gil
post #2 of 13
I keep all new comer s and recent moves in for six months then gradually reintroduce outside in a cat escape proof yard
post #3 of 13
I moved last summer with my five and they have always been inside/outside. I kept them indoors for a month and then started taking them out on leads, one at a time (it became compulsory for visitors to catwalk too!) Then I let them out free, when I was sure they could find their way back easily to their new home. That all went fine. But I would give you a warning. I lost one of mine only two months later to rat poison. There are dangers in the rural areas not even thought about in the city or suburbs. I also know people here whose cats were shot by farmers or hunters. There are also rabbit traps. So I would make sure that wherever you go you research the potential problems carefully and talk with all the neighbours within a mile or so on what the cats are likely to encounter.
post #4 of 13
Please be aware that there are coyotes and eagles in rural areas that will kill a cat very easily.
You'll also have heartworm and ticks to contend with if the weather stays unseasonably warm.
post #5 of 13
My kits are indoor/outdoors and like others, whenever we have moved I have always kept them in for as long as possible - you know how they are - when they want to go out - they want to go out
Also good advise about checking out what goes on in the area in terms of wild animals that might come about, you neighbours would know, also if there are farms go say "hello" and get chatting them about your cat. If you use Frontline, that should also protect against ticks. Well good luck and I am sure your kitty will be fine
post #6 of 13
It can be true - but if you keep her inside for a month or 2 and then take her outside on a harness or supervise her for awhile, I'm sure she will stick around. It will help if you have her favorite foods/treats close by to keep her on the property.

I'm assuming she is spayed - if not get her done now before the move as she will want to roam a lot more if unspayed.
post #7 of 13
Something else I wanted to add.....

after you have kept them in (to get used to you new home etc) and then you let them out, the normal behaviour that a cat exhibits is a sort of "surveying" an area outside where you let them out. This is your kit getting the smells of the area into the memory, it will only be a small area to start off with, you should notice they will keep coming back to the house Then on the next venture, the "circle of exploration" will get bigger and bigger. This all helps them memorise the new patch and help find their way home, Its like a "crumb trail "
Of course, you need to be monitoring this, I wouldnt advise you go out for the day and leave them too it.
Keep us posted
post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks for your replies.

Since Peaches has always been an outdoor cat, it would be hard(and frustrating) to convert her to an all indoors cat.

I have never even thought about coyotees or eagles, or even other
farmers.

I don't think people will be a problem, since we are going to be moving
to 60+ acres of land.

However, snakes, spiders, and other critters like that could be a problem.

For the first 2 months or so, she will be an indoor cat.

When we do start to let her outside, I will constantly monitor her.

One other thing. Peaches LOVES to be outside at night time, when a lot
of creatures(sometimes dangerous ones) are out.

Should she not be allowed to go outside at night when we move? I can
only imagine what kind of animals would be out there.

Thanks,
Gil
post #9 of 13
I would b very worried about coyotes if I lived in a rural area, not to mention the other outdoor cats who are roaming that might carry nasty diseases. I'd also worry about ticks, mites and fleas. Some of these dangers are compounded at night when other creatures are hunting.
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peaches2001 View Post

However, snakes, spiders, and other critters like that could be a problem
Miss Moofi got bit by a rat once, her little paw came up like a boxing glove we had a week of vet checks and anti-bios but then she was fine. She´s a little monkey and gets her prying paws into everything


Quote:
Originally Posted by Peaches2001 View Post
Should she not be allowed to go outside at night when we move?
If you "tire" her out during the day, then hopefully all she´ll want to do is sleep at night


Quote:
Originally Posted by lionessrampant View Post
I'd also worry about ticks, mites and fleas. Some of these dangers are compounded at night when other creatures are hunting.
re: ticks etc, Frontline should protect against this, and you know, cats are very canny creatures, if they are used to going out they know whats going on. I have watched mine many times to see how they react. We have a roaming male that comes to leave his "calling card" and did have a fight with Miss Moofi (its always her - but I think thats cos she´s the youngest, the other are a lot older and know better)

Yep, its tough and worrying when they dont come home on time, but in the 3 years we´ve had Moofi she´s had 3 problems, so thats one a year for her The other two, well I can honestly say, not one problem relating to being an outdoor kit ! In fact Pepsi has never, never, ever been to the vets except for her annual jabs
post #11 of 13
I have always made sure that my cats are in at night, though that can be hard in summer time! Most accidents that happen to cats happen at night, in all areas, so it seems safer to do that. And that is when most predators are out. They get used to it pretty quickly. I just shut the doors/cat flaps after dinner. And if one is out later, then I go out to call them and get them in as soon as I can.
post #12 of 13
I live on 5 acres in a rural area. One of my cats loves being out at night too as I think it must be good hunting time. I would not leave your cat outside for several weeks until she gets acclimated to the new house. We have hawks but they haven't been a problem for the cats (only the rabbits!!) Still you could have stray/feral cats around-your cat would know by smelling every schrub in your yard. Could you put her out on a leash and harness to start?? I would still see how far the neighbors are and like Jenny said find out if they are cat lovers or not too.
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by GailC View Post
I live on 5 acres in a rural area. One of my cats loves being out at night too as I think it must be good hunting time. I would not leave your cat outside for several weeks until she gets acclimated to the new house. We have hawks but they haven't been a problem for the cats (only the rabbits!!) Still you could have stray/feral cats around-your cat would know by smelling every schrub in your yard. Could you put her out on a leash and harness to start?? I would still see how far the neighbors are and like Jenny said find out if they are cat lovers or not too.
We lived in a rural area, 5 acres of our own, with surrounding plots of 20, 40, and 200 wooded acres. I kept my cats in for a couple of weeks, then out with us (the next time we moved, I used a harness ), and yes, I did lose one, at night, so now all of ours come in at night for "treats" (plus, now we live in a neighborhood, and have coyotes- go figure ) , and I would advise this, too. The hawks only bothered our rabbits, too. However, we did have the one cat who liked to stalk turkeys she's the one that disappeared one night, and I'm afraid that she just didn't have much outdoor sense (though her mother has alot of it), and probably should have been an indoor cat, in retrospect. But if your cats have done well outside already, then I'm sure they will be fine- the other 3 cats we have (and had when we had the 5 acres) are all alive and well and elderly now (13, 10, and 10 ). Just take it slow .

Good luck, and (60 acres!) I am so jealous!
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