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The administration of Fish Mox

post #1 of 59
Thread Starter 
My Better half found that Fish Mox can be given to cats. We've found the dosage for dogs but not cats. Has anyone used Fish Mox for cats? Our Vet refuses to write a prescription for us to get amoxicillin from online. She charges $30.00 for a 14ml bottle. The Fish Mox she found comes in 250MG capsule form for less than $10.00. Pointing me in the right direction would be a great help as there are 5 sick kitties in my house that need the mox!
post #2 of 59
What is Fish Mox, please?
post #3 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by gizmocat View Post
What is Fish Mox, please?
Amoxicillin capsules that you put in aquariums to treat sick fish.
post #4 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by fourwayz View Post
My Better half found that Fish Mox can be given to cats. We've found the dosage for dogs but not cats. Has anyone used Fish Mox for cats? Our Vet refuses to write a prescription for us to get amoxicillin from online. She charges $30.00 for a 14ml bottle. The Fish Mox she found comes in 250MG capsule form for less than $10.00. Pointing me in the right direction would be a great help as there are 5 sick kitties in my house that need the mox!
If there's another vet where you live I'd be looking for a different one as it appears that your current vet is more interested in making a profit than she is in your ability to treat your kitties.

I've never heard of giving Fish Mox to cats or dogs. I've been curious myself if it could be though. Sorry I can't help you.
post #5 of 59
PLEASE DONT use FISH MEDS for the cat ... I second getting another vet ... Fish meds are made for JUST FISH not mammels ..
post #6 of 59
My only comment would be that often the meds you order online are not the same strength or composition as what you get from the vet. AND, sometimes they are knock-offs and do nothing.

Personally (and this is my own personal choice) I would get all my medications from a vet for my cats. It's just not worth it to me to take a chance on anything else.
post #7 of 59
I agree with Yosemite....it's not a good idea to give fish food to the cat. You don't know what side effects it might have. Cat meds are formulated FOR cats only. Fish meds are for fish.
post #8 of 59
I've used fish-mox (amoxi) and fish-cillian (pennacillian) and fish-cyclene (tetratrycyclen) (Please forgive my spelling) on both my dogs and my cats. But, I've used it under the close supervision of my vet (daily bloodwork and check-ups). I didn't try it on my own not knowing what would happen to my animals. I agree with trying another vet. These aren't things you want to give to your pet without the supervision of a vet that knows what they are doing. My vet did warn me that if you give "foreign" medication to a cat/dog and it had a reaction to it, that can be considered animal abuse. Because you knowingly gave your pet an unknown medication without thought or care. (His words, not mine so don't get mad at me, please. I know you care or you wouldn't even ask)
post #9 of 59
I would go ahead and follow the already given advice of finding another vet.

I "worked" on a fish forum for quite a while moderating the health and disease forum. There are a good number of antibiotics and other types of medications that are used in both fish and humans (metronidazole, tetracycline, minocyline and erythromycin are some examples). Medications such as levamisole and praziquantel, which are used as dewormers in cats, dogs and cattle, can be used to treat nematodes and tapeworms in fish. All of that said, I would never take something that is intended for my fish nor would I give something that was intended for my use to the fish. I apply the same thing to my cats. I think that it would best to err on the side of caution and get a prescription for your cat from a veterinarian rather than to use a medication designed for another animal.

Bryan
post #10 of 59
Your vet is grossly overcharging you for antibiotics. I have a cat that has been on amoxycillan three times and each time I was charged far less for it. One of those three times I got it from a 24 hour emergency clinic that charges 50% more for the visit and lab work than my regular vet and they still charged me far less for the antibiotic.
post #11 of 59
Thread Starter 
Whew! Thanks for all of the advice! I did go back to the vet who issued me a larger quantity(bottle) of antibiotic at $12.00. She still refuses to give me a prescription though. I did not have to haggle the price for the of the meds. Oddly enough, what she prescribed had instructions for HUMAN consumption. The first meds were strictly for animals. I'm going to look for another vet.
Thanks again to all!
post #12 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by fourwayz View Post
Whew! Thanks for all of the advice! I did go back to the vet who issued me a larger quantity(bottle) of antibiotic at $12.00. She still refuses to give me a prescription though. I did not have to haggle the price for the of the meds. Oddly enough, what she prescribed had instructions for HUMAN consumption. The first meds were strictly for animals. I'm going to look for another vet.
Thanks again to all!
Glad to hear you got the medication you needed and at a reasonable price.
post #13 of 59
Has anyone else noticed that sometimes in the Drs Foster & Smith cateloges, that in the cat med section, they have fish meds. Though they don't say anything about giving them to cats, I see it as a notion...

That has to be illegal. We use it, when necessary, and haven't had any problems.

Seems like you have solved the problem yourself though, great to hear you are getting a new vet!!!
post #14 of 59
A pharmicist told me to give a wounded cat Fish Mox (50mg 2-3 times per day). He said to open up the 250 mg capsule and divide it into fifths. Then put one fifth in the cats food.

I question if Fish Mox (amoxicillin) is as good as the Amoxi drops from the vet (also amoxicillin), but its better than nothing. A vet once told me that veterinary medications are a big money maker for them and are usually a big rip off for patients. She said that several of the dog/cat medications are exactly the same as those for humans BUT the dosage is very different.
post #15 of 59
The secrets of the rescuing world is that many of us use medications for other animals. You just have to know a thing or two about doses and ingredients. I know a lady who takes fish mox herself when she is sick. It is all the SAME thing just I would question the quality of a fish amoxi if a human were talking it I know another lady who has all this knowledge in her head and we are trying to get her to write it all down, she should publish a book about it to save all us rescuers some money in vet bills.

Just do some research before you get into that stuff. You really need to kow what you are doing.
post #16 of 59
A lot of breeders use Fish Mox and other meds that are marketed for fish or livestock. It saves money when you have a lot of animals, and with baby kittens or puppies it can be important to have things on hand and know how to use them, rather than wait until the vet can see them. Most of them do consult their vets, and/or get the appropriate dosage from vet manuals. I seriously doubt it's illegal. I don't do this myself, but if you do the proper research I don't see anything wrong with it.
post #17 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by KatKisses View Post
Has anyone else noticed that sometimes in the Drs Foster & Smith cateloges, that in the cat med section, they have fish meds. Though they don't say anything about giving them to cats, I see it as a notion...

That has to be illegal. We use it, when necessary, and haven't had any problems.

Seems like you have solved the problem yourself though, great to hear you are getting a new vet!!!
While reading through this thread I was thinking the same thing, there is a bottle of fish mox in the cat catalog. I wondered about it, it needs no perscription.
post #18 of 59
PLEASE folk s TALK with a MEDICAL professional PRIOR to using anything OFF LABEL... DEATH CAN and HAS occured
post #19 of 59
Working in the humane society, I often see people bringing in sick cats & dogs they treated themselves with something not intended for the species or from a "recipe" they saw online. I've seen many animals die because the owners decided to treat themselves rather than go through the vet.

Ultimately, you must decide....there is the risk of death or grevious bodily harm when trying things on your own. Please, be careful....is it worth risking their lives?
post #20 of 59
I think the Number One TCS Forum Rule needs to be posted here ...

1. No online advice can replace direct veterinary intervention. If you suspect that your cat may be ill, please contact your vet immediately. You are welcome to look for advice in the health forum while waiting for that appointment, but never delay proper veterinary care waiting for Internet advice. Remember that cats, and especially kittens, are very adept in keeping pain to themselves and delaying treatment may cause irreversible damage.

That now being said, while there may not be anything wrong with using Fishmox or any other such antibiotic off label, the fact is that unless you are working with a skilled vet, you probably shouldn't use these types of medications. When dealing with an upper respiratory infection in cats, it is always best to request a sputum culture and sensitivity test performed to determine which bacteria is causing the infection and what antibiotic is specifically formulated to treat it.
post #21 of 59
Your vet does not have the right to refuse to provide you with a prescription. The following is from the North Carolina Veterinary Medical Board website (http://www.ncvmb.org/assets/FAQ.htm):

Quote:
Prescription Issues:

In March 1996, N.C. Assistant Attorney General Kip Sturgis contacted the Board by letter as a result of complaints received by the Attorney Generals office concerning veterinarians and prescriptions. In that letter Mr. Sturgis summarized his office concerns as followed, the first on medically unjustified restraint of competition in the market for veterinary medicine. The second is directed to the ethics of these anticompetitive practices that not only place the veterinarians commercial interest in direct conflict with the animals owner, but may also undermine the veterinarians professional purpose to promote animal health by foreseeably leading some owners to delay or forego veterinary treatment of their animals. The third, reflected by complaints both agencies have received, focuses on the damage these practices have on the publics perception of veterinarians professionalism.

If a veterinarian based upon his or her medical opinion is willing to dispense medication, then they (veterinarians) must also provide a prescription, in place of said medication, should the owner request a prescription. If a veterinarian based upon his or her medical opinion not be willing to dispense medication, than it would also be appropriate to deny a request for a prescription.
If you choose, you could file a complaint with the NCMVB. I would let your vet know that she is in violation of the state's veterinary medical practices. Most, if not all, states have a similar rule--you should always be able to get a written prescription to be filled elsewhere.
post #22 of 59
For those, like me, who end up here after doing a Google search, I'd like to add some observations I've compiled after repeatedly paying too much money at the vet for something that I can pick up at the feed store for about $10:

Clavimox, as prescribed by the veterinarian for my 13-pound male cat (he's a big boy), comes in a 15ml bottle and claims to contain 62.5mg per 1 ml of the active ingredient amoxicillin. I am to give him 1 ml every 12 hours for 7 days.

The Fish Mox capsules I purchased at the local feed store each contain 250mg of amoxicillin.

I'll stop short of posting the actual formula I use, as I am certainly not a vet, and don't encourage anyone to do this I think it is awfully convenient, however that each Fish Mox tab has exactly 4 "vet recommended" doses in it. I guess I'll also add that my cat doesn't mind how Fish Mox tastes when mixed with water and put into a Clavimox-branded syringe.

While I've tried to avoid the controversy in this post, I just can't leave without adding these two bits: I appreciate those of you who try to warn people of the dangers of treating a pet without "professional" guidance, but I identify much more strongly with people who are caring for animals that no one else will care for, that vets refuse to see without a $100 payment, and which would otherwise die without some clever, well researched, and carefully executed home care.
post #23 of 59
Please read RULE 1 of the FORUMS....


No online advice can replace direct veterinary intervention. If you suspect that your cat may be ill, please contact your vet immediately. You are welcome to look for advice in the health forum while waiting for that appointment, but never delay proper veterinary care waiting for Internet advice. Remember that cats, and especially kittens, are very adept in keeping pain to themselves and delaying treatment may cause irreversible damage.

The advice given here cannot take into account your cat’s previous history, and nobody here can give your cat a physical exam to check for any abnormalities. Please feel free to get opinions here, but take your cat to the vet, and discuss any possible solutions with your vet to get their expert, medical opinion first.


Also If you were truely trying to avoid contraversy you would not have posted information that could CAUSE DEATH if not use properly...
post #24 of 59
Getting medications elsewhere cheaper is always helpful, but just make sure you let your vet know that you are planning on doing that and what specific pill you're going to get. While there are many animal medications that are just human medications, there are also many more that have a slightly different ingredient that may end up being lethal for a cat.

So please never medicate your cat with any drug without first consulting with your vet, even if the medication appears the same.
post #25 of 59
About Fish Mox (please note I am NOT saying it should be used without a vet, just stating the facts).

Amoxicillin is Amoxicillin - PERIOD. If it is pure, that is what you are getting - Amoxicillin. No two ways about it, and that is what it is... Crazy, but that is that. Yep, this is the same stuff we humans take to our infections with Drs. prescription, and cats and dogs take under vet prescription.

Fish Mox is Pure Amoxicillin 250mg, and the Forte version is Pure 500mg. Due to pricing it is widely used by people who run cat rescues and sanctuaries, etc.

As the other poster mentioned, it is essentially the same stuff as Clavamox, so for people with multiple cats and cats that have recurrent URIs, this can in fact save a lot of $$$ - BUT under vet guidance, at least so he/she can help you to set up dosage...

But it is the same stuff.... Well... Let's just say I have some on my own medicine cabinet for both my cats but specially for me, with the approval of my dad, who is a big time chemist (and Dad, before all) and my personal Doctor... I also have for my cats, just in case, and will use it if needed, BUT WILL TAKE IT TO THE VET FOR DOSAGE.

Do a search on Amazon, and you will see just what I am talking about...

Now, with that stated, it is an antibiotic, and should not be used without the guidance of a vet. Another vet might be happy to work with you on dosages...

Please, NEVER EVER give a medicine to your cats without consulting your vets!!!
post #26 of 59

A colony of feral cats owns us. Thanks to a local program for spaying/neutering, there are now only eighteen of them. When one gets sick, some others do. Paying for a vet is not something we can afford. We give them food, water and shelter ($6 plastic storage containers with a round hole at one end and bath rugs for insulation -- they love them).

 

As with most feral cats, they have to deal with an upper respiratory infection when they are around 6-8 weeks. It seems to be a rite of passage. We use the fish medication. Without it, they will certainly suffer through a week.

 

It is ridiculous that we live in a world where the medical community locks away knowledge of and access to medication even for animals. I expect the vet community to take action to "protect" even fish from us ignorant owners by requiring a prescription for fish medication. If vets really did care for pets, the medication and information about dosages would be posted on the internet with their blessing.

 

I know there are vets who are not in the biz for the money, but in general, the vet community is all about making money.

 

You can call and talk to a local animal charity for accurate information on dosages and medications that will not cost you next weeks food for your cat(s).

post #27 of 59

I came across this website "Cat Care Tips" when I was trying to figure out the most cost-effective way to worm a bunch of cats.  It gives instructions for using a few different types of fish antibiotics on cats.  The instructions for amoxicillin are just to add it to a jug of water and use that as their water source, but it actually seems to me like 250mg/gallon of water isn't a strong enough dose, but it depends entirely on how much the cats drink.  I suppose it's convenient for large numbers of cats.  You could also mix it into wet food, I guess.  

 

I Googled amoxicillin dose for cats, and several sites said that the standard dose is 5-10mg/pound every 12-24 hours.  

post #28 of 59

Did you ever try it. Last year I tried the fish tetracycline, that I bought at Petsmart, on my cat with URI.  But, I had to give it to her in her food (fussy) so it didn't work at all.  I need amoxicillin BADLY.  My 20+ cats keep getting URI, esp. in winter when they all huddle closely together to keep warm.

post #29 of 59

OMG!!!!!! This heavenssafehaven.webs.com site of ct tips that you recommended sounds like it woulda saved the lives of a few of my rescued cats..in the psat...and will save more NOW!!! I'll tell the other rescue lady I know!!!!

post #30 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by wynnt View Post

Did you ever try it. Last year I tried the fish tetracycline, that I bought at Petsmart, on my cat with URI.  But, I had to give it to her in her food (fussy) so it didn't work at all.  I need amoxicillin BADLY.  My 20+ cats keep getting URI, esp. in winter when they all huddle closely together to keep warm.

It doesn't work if you put it in their food?  I thought it did... 

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