TheCatSite.com › Forums › Cat Breeds, Breeding and Showing › Showing and Ethical Breeding › Is there a positive to breeding?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Is there a positive to breeding?  

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
*Newbie who's asking questions*

I just wanted to know what the positives are to breeding cats? I want to know all the facts, and the side FOR breeding, from the breeders themselves, before I make up my own opinion about the subject. Any takers?
post #2 of 25
Yes, the rewards are producing a quality cat that is both a great show cat and a very loving pet . As long as you don't overbreed or have too many litters/kittens and they are healthy, social animals, you are fine.

When you have to resort to cats living their lives in tiny cages and too many running around, sick, etc. you are NOT a good breeder.

I loved seeing my rex kittens grow, develop and knowing they were going to loving, spoiled homes
post #3 of 25
Why do I breed? I breed for the love of the breed, to produce quality kittens, and to promote the beauty and joy of having a wonderful shorthair cat. You've never been owned by a cat until you've been owned by an Aby!

But, as GK says, when you breed, the whole point is supporting and loving your cats and not the other way around. There is no use at all breeding cats to pay your bills.

When you have an old breed like mine, it's nice to know that you're keeping that breed's bloodlines alive.

My friend purchased an Aby from me to give to her father. He finally admitted (not to me, of course!) that he really likes the cat. I asked him today - "I heard you've fallen in love with Rudy" he replied "No, but Rudy has fallen in love with me...he follows me around and will play with me, give me kisses and headbutts and will lie quietly when I read the paper. At other times, he's just a rascal" he said with a smile. "Ah" I said, and grinned " But the point is, you let him!".

This is why I breed cats.
post #4 of 25
Thread Starter 
But how does breeding a cat benefit the cat species in general? Why is breeding a good thing? And cat shows were brought up- why are cat shows a good thing?
post #5 of 25
Hi FutureCatLady!

Responsible breeding (as is done by our established breeding members) benefits the breed by weeding out health problems and creating a stronger, healthier cat with each generation. They have genetic testing, the queen's health is of foremost concern, the breeders have knowledge of animal husbandry more than "just let em go at it".

Breeding a cat in this way does benefit that breed, as to the species of cats in general, well that's a much more tangled web IMO, but I participated in that debate once and only once. There is a quite lengthy thread you may be interested in on that topic.

As for cat shows, they aren't entirely necessary, but what is necessary is that the cats being bred are show-quality, in that they conform to breed standards and behavior and such.

Just the two cents of a spayed moggy owner!
post #6 of 25
By breeding healthy animals ... ones without known health issues .. You are helping that breeds surivial ( the applehead siamese is a good example)... Breeding is a good thing since not all of us want a mixed breed cat , some want to know what mom and dad looked like and what traits they can expect in there kitten ... Cat shows are helpful as they teach folks about the different breeds help breeders by being a meeting place
post #7 of 25
The benefits of responsible breeding of bloodlines carefully selected for health are seen in healthier, longer-lived cats. The benefits of responsible breeding of bloodlines specifically selected for positive traits are seen in the cat show rings in the way of close compliance with the accepted breed standard. The goal of breeding is to benefit the breed ... and while this does not, IMO, benefit the species as a whole, it does allow us to produce cats which are healthier and a better example of the standard for the different breeds.
post #8 of 25
AS a non-breeder and just in case the point is not clear, I speak for 99% of TCS members when I say that breeding any cat who is not show quality, with the specific aim of improving the breed (and that means a lot of knowledge and research) is NOT a good idea and does not benefit the cat species as a whole. However much we love cats, we all know that there are far too many of them in the world. So we do not breed our beloved pets, however much we think that their adorable traits should be passed on. The 'positive' sides to breeding that are sometimes mentioned on this site, such as giving children the opportunity to witness birth, can easily be obtained by fostering or adopting the many pregnant cats that are available through shelters. But it is a good question and thank you for asking it.
post #9 of 25
Responsible breeders are very important to keep the breed alive and healthy. They breed for looks, health, and temperment. Without breeders alot of pedigreed breeds would disappear. As for shows those are important to breeders so they know what they are breeding fits the standard. Also at shows they meet other breeders and can discuss genetics and everything else about breeding. If you are a breeder and dont show your cats how do you know if your line isnt falling away from what the breed is suppose to look like? How would you meet other breeders to add new lines so your not inbreeding? I feel showing is a very important part to any responsible breeding program.
post #10 of 25
Shows are also a good way to inform the public about many issues regarding pets or cats. You have shelters that can find prospective homes for their cats, you can educate the public in neutering/spaying, and about the different breeds.

Like one poster says, some people would like a "purebred" cat that is different then the ordinary ones. And I can almost guarentee that every breeder has or had mixed breed cats in their house and love them just as much as the pedigree ones.

Some breeds help those with allergies be able to have a cat - there are cats that cause less reactions. So that's a very good reason to breed healthy cats that are purebred.
post #11 of 25
Thread Starter 
*Newbie question again*
Don't look down on me for seeming ignorant! *sulks*
But, what exactly is a purebred cat? A cat who's parents are of the same breed? And then on the other hand there's a cat who's parents are of different breeds? Which is more healthy? Someone said that breeding weeds out health problems. But I was always under the impression that breeding was the cause of many health problems. For example, you have the Apple head Siamese cat. That's the original look of the Siamese cat, I happen to have one at home who I love dearly *smiles and purrs* But then you have the stereotypical Siamese cats that most people imagine when the word Siamese is mentioned. The really skinny cats with the long skinny faces. Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't those cats exist BECAUSE of breeding? And don't those cats have alot of health problems BECAUSE of their body shape and the shape of their heads? In turn, wouldnt the specific breeding of the Siamese to make it look like that, have caused those health problems to arise?
post #12 of 25
But, what exactly is a purebred cat? A cat who's parents are of the same breed? I think different answers can be given to that question. My definition of a purebred cat is a cat who's proven parents are of the same breed. Proven by pedigree, DNA or by "word" (even though the last is a bit uncertain, people don't always tell the truth).

And then on the other hand there's a cat who's parents are of different breeds? Which is more healthy? I'd say you really can't tell which one will be the healthies one. Breed one Persian with PKD with a Maine Coon with HCM and you might get cross bred kittens with PKD and/or HCM. The problem with purebreeding is often a limited gene pool. Many breeders inbreed and inbreeding isn't healthy in the long run.

Someone said that breeding weeds out health problems. But I was always under the impression that breeding was the cause of many health problems. For example, you have the Apple head Siamese cat. That's the original look of the Siamese cat, I happen to have one at home who I love dearly *smiles and purrs* But then you have the stereotypical Siamese cats that most people imagine when the word Siamese is mentioned. The really skinny cats with the long skinny faces. Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't those cats exist BECAUSE of breeding? As I mentioned, inbreeding is often used in breeding programs and that isn't healthy. There are reasons to why Mother Nature has built up natural systems to avoid inbreeding. I don't dare say anything about the Siamese health though, it's not "my" breed.

And don't those cats have alot of health problems BECAUSE of their body shape and the shape of their heads? In turn, wouldnt the specific breeding of the Siamese to make it look like that, have caused those health problems to arise? Again, I don't wanna say anything about the Siamese health but you surely can breed for unhealthy features. We see it in both dogs and cats. The problems with runny eyes and breathing that the Persian used to have (and some poorly bred Persians today still have) was caused by "extreme breeding". That's something we breeders have to be aware of all of the time. We need to know the dangers of breeding for more extreme features.

I've chosen to become a breeder because I wanna help maintaining "my breed", the Devon Rex, a healthy breed. I wanna be a part of conserving their health and temperment as well as developing type. However I'm one of those who don't wanna "extreme type". I wanna have healthy, lovely and beautyful cats. I also believe in making the gene pool larger by cross breeding. With the Devon Rex we have the possibility to register Devon Rex cross breeds as Devon Rex variants and use them in further breeding. A wonderful opportunity!
post #13 of 25
Slight :hyjack: .... Can you with certainty DNA test a cat for breed???
post #14 of 25
I believe a purebred cat is one that is the same cats in at least 3 generations - not just the parents. You have to have continued similarities in several generations. You can also trace the cat's pedigree for many many generations.

Its predictability - not just random breeding. Random is so many factors involved you cannot get the consistency you want in one or 2 generations.
post #15 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharky View Post
Slight :hyjack: .... Can you with certainty DNA test a cat for breed???
No, you can't tell the difference between the different breeds with DNA tests but you can do paternity tests. I know of a few breeders that have had to use DNA tests to find out who's the father to their litter after them finding out that their queen has had some fun with more than one male.
post #16 of 25
Thread Starter 
GoldenKitty45, you are currently, or used to be, involved with the CFA, correct?
post #17 of 25
I've shown and granded cats in CFA, but more involved with showing/granding cats in ACFA; plus was a ACFA licensed HHP judge.
post #18 of 25
Thread Starter 
Is it true that those associations put money and volunteering into humane societies and animal shelters? Another question, are you a cat breeder?
post #19 of 25
Most cat clubs (not really the association) give to local human groups/shelters - part of their show profit goes to the group.

I was breeding rexes for about 10 yrs - not anymore. After my divorce I stopped breeding and placed most of the cats - plus I moved to a new state and remarried - took our oldest cat with us (son wanted him).

We have a HHP now and plan on adopting an ocicat in the spring - just as a pet - not for show/breeding.
post #20 of 25
Thread Starter 
So as a past breeder, how do you feel about some people's negative views on breeding-focusing on the fact that breeding is taking away from potential homes for stray cats?
post #21 of 25
There's a place for both. For some, you have pedigree cats, for others, they want mixed. I only had one litter a year and I had homes for the kittens before they were born.

As long as you are a responsible breeder and do not overbreed, you can have your place in the cat fancy. For me, I like both HHP's and pedigrees as I've had both and always will.

You have irresponsible people who allow their mixes to breed and you have just as irresponsible people who overbreed pedigrees. But I feel there is a place for both in this world.
post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by FutureCatLady View Post
So as a past breeder, how do you feel about some people's negative views on breeding-focusing on the fact that breeding is taking away from potential homes for stray cats?
Een though I know this was directed towards GoldenKitty45, I wanted to address it as a breeder as well. This question has brought up to me time and again - it is a very valid question and I thank you for asking it here.

The fact is that kittens produced by breeders most often do not take away potential homes from stray or rescued cats. People who purchase pedigreed cats do so for various reasons; among them the known traits of a certain breed, ancestry and known health issues. Most of these people have either shared their homes with a cat of a specific breed before and wish to do so again or have other, intimate knowledge of specific breed traits. In purchasing a pedigreed cat from a breeder, they are (for the most part) assured that the kitten they are purchasing is, in fact, a member of that breed with those familiar traits, ancestry and known health issues.

Adopting a shelter or rescue cat contains many unknown variables. While I am in absolutely no way, shape or form trying to discourage anyone here from adopting a rescue or shelter cat, the truth is that certain people want to be assured of personality traits, health issues or ancestry in the pets they bring into their homes. Those people normally would not even consider adopting a rescue or shelter cat. There is no choice for them, they will seek the services of a breeder every time. Can this be considered an elitist mindset? Yes, sometimes it can be. But, it is a fact of life as we know it.
post #23 of 25
Thread Starter 
I assume that we're all cat lovers here. So I'm sure that all of our hearts break when we think of how many homeless and/or abused cats there are out there. What do you guys think may be a solution to so many homeless cats? Have you heard of the "Trap-Neuter-Return" Program? If so, any thoughts?
post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by FutureCatLady View Post
I assume that we're all cat lovers here. So I'm sure that all of our hearts break when we think of how many homeless and/or abused cats there are out there. What do you guys think may be a solution to so many homeless cats? Have you heard of the "Trap-Neuter-Return" Program? If so, any thoughts?
For thoughts on TNR I would suggest the stray and feral forum on here ... it is wornderful
post #25 of 25
Additionally, I would also suggest that questions along these lines would be far better served in the In My Opinion Forum here at TCS. Once you have achieved the appropriate membership status, please feel free to post your questions there.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Showing and Ethical Breeding
This thread is locked  
TheCatSite.com › Forums › Cat Breeds, Breeding and Showing › Showing and Ethical Breeding › Is there a positive to breeding?