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Do You Feed Raw?

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
Ok out this poll jumps from another thread. How many TCSers feed raw?

I guess it dosne't matter how many people say "no" because there are 2,359 active members so we can draw a few statistics from this. More importantly how many "yes"s will we get?

I guess this will be biased towards those that visit this forum in a give period of time but we can still make inferences .
post #2 of 25
I don't yet, but I've started doing some more research with the thought of starting the process to switch to a raw diet.
post #3 of 25
I checked yes, because it didn't ask "Do you feed raw exclusively?"

Raw is part of my food plan, yes, but not 100%.
post #4 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cearbhaill View Post
Raw is part of my food plan, yes, but not 100%.
Thats fine . Technically I do the same. I feed half canned salmon. For the most part I consider myself a raw feeder though.
post #5 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolarityBengals View Post
Thats fine . Technically I do the same. I feed half canned salmon. For the most part I consider myself a raw feeder though.

My bengals don't seem to tolerate salmon at all. They like it, but it gives them loose stools. How do you feed yours the salmon? Mix it in? Seperate?
Did you have any problems at first? Do their digestive systems just need to become accustomed to it?
post #6 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kai Bengals View Post
My bengals don't seem to tolerate salmon at all. They like it, but it gives them loose stools. How do you feed yours the salmon? Mix it in? Seperate?
Did you have any problems at first? Do their digestive systems just need to become accustomed to it?
Yes I did have some trouble at first. My vet strongly advised me to incorporate this into my raw diet. She is a Maine Coon breeder and does the same combo I do. She feeds one meal salmon and one raw each day. This does not work for me. I was also advised to stay away from mackerel and other sorts of fish, that salmon was the best one (she could go on forever about the health benefits of salmon - its nice having a vet I feel I can trust). Also the bone in the salmon is nutritious and not dangerous for them to eat, the cookign proccess they use calcifies the bone (I think thats what she said, I can't quite remember?).

So for the most part I just can't feed it by itself. I mix it in to the meat. I started just mixing a little. Now I take a pound of raw and mix it with 1 can of salmon. The cats adore it! For my pregnant cat, she has me give her 1/4tsp cod liver oil every day but she said that it can't be anymore than that as you don't want to overdose. Since the pregnancy and lactation is so taxing on the liver the extra liver support is good. She also has me give 1inch cube (for 3 cats) of raw beef liver twice a week.

I think the salmon is like any other food, if you feed it suddenly in any quantity it overloads the system. Also if the liver is unhealthy it will have a harder time handling it. But a slow gradual transition to incorporate it into the diet should be easier on the GI. It took some time to figure this out for me. But all the kitties are back to healthy poops, the fish dosen't make it any stinkier either.
post #7 of 25
I don't feed raw, but I do offer raw meats as treats.

I'd certainly switch my crew over to raw if I had a freezer.
All I've got now is the tiny ice box on top of my fridge.
post #8 of 25
One cat in the house gets raw exlusively and that would be ms Maia my IBS girl.
post #9 of 25
Gigi is all raw and man has it helped

Kandie is raw and canned ( note to self ask about salmon, vet said mackeral last time)

Zoey dry food junkie who prefers her raw very fresh as in it had a heartbeat a few seconds ago... have gotten her to eat small amount s of canned and raw everyday

Fish get some blanched foods and a mix of frozen( raw I guess) ,pellets, flakes and anything else I find
post #10 of 25
To be honest, I don't feed raw, and the reason why is because it scares me. I am so scared that I'd screw it up, and one of my boys would get sick.
post #11 of 25
No, my girlies eat wet food. Sierra ate raw for a period of time a few years ago, but I discontinued this due to concerns about the potential dangers of a raw food diet.
post #12 of 25
I feed raw to my cats, as well as to my dogs.
post #13 of 25
Thread Starter 
The vet told me the mercury content of salmon is not a concern, where mackerel it would be. Here was a little info I found:
Quote:
Alaskan salmon are among the purest of all ocean species. In addition to residing in the most remote and pristine waters left on earth, Alaskan salmon are relatively small, short-lived fish that feed at the lower end of the food chain. Consequently they grow free of hazardous levels of contaminants found in larger, longer-lived carnivorous species.
Hmm I need to make sure I'm getting Alaskan salmon and not Atlantic.

I guess if the mackerel was farm raised then it wouldn't matter about mercury, but farm raised often are in poor conditions so might be less nutritious.
post #14 of 25
As I am in Iceland I feed a little bit different raw food then you might in europe or usa. For the most part my cats eat dry food and seem to do very well on it. Then I always share my food with anyone that wants a bite. That would most often be cooked chicken, fat fish, lamb, horse, or liver. Then I feed them as often as I can raw food. That would be raw lamb meat, raw horse meat, raw liver, heart or kidney. I never feed them cooked lean fish (as in cod) because it usually upsets their stomach. But fat fish (salmon, halibut, makrel, herring, sardines) seems to go down much easier,they like it much more and it has more of the good oils in it.
And to let you on a secret then it really benefits when you are trying to lose weight. It seems that when you consume fat fish the oils in the fish makes the body fat deposits desolve more easier. Why it happens I really dont know, but I have lost much more pounds in the weeks when I eat salmon every day then the other weeks, and so many people I have talked to and heard about have the same experience, more fat fish, more rapid weight loss.... Well way over the topic I guess...

Then again the horse meat is really good for the cats, because the horses in Iceland are basically outside most or all of the year, and they dont eat anything else but vegetatition of the ground or hey so they are like game when you look at the meat. The fat in horse meat isnt hard. In fact you cant keep horse meat frosen for a long time because the fat doesnt freeze like beef fat. Because the fat in the horse meat isnt hard it is similar in structure like the fat in the fish, so it is more beneficiary for the coronary system then beef. Lamb meat is also good, since the lambs dont get feed in houses, but are grasing in the mountains untill slaughter-time in the fall, but they have the hard fat and the cats dont like the taste as much as the horse.
post #15 of 25
thanks for making this poll, i felt too inexperienced to do this.

i want to switch to raw but currently do a wet/dry combo. i am going to pick up a book on it tomorrow and talk to my vet tomorrow as Stoli is going to be microchipped....
post #16 of 25
It's funny, I thought about making this poll too!

My kitties are both raw fed almost entirely. The only time they get something else is if I a) forgot to defrost dinner! (hey, it happens!) or b) Nya gets really fussy about a certain meat and needs a little wet food on top to entice her.
post #17 of 25
I am so glad I am not the only one forgetting to defrost raw food ...
post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharky View Post
I am so glad I am not the only one forgetting to defrost raw food ...
I probably forget about twice a week on average

That's what canned food is for
post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by heidrun View Post
Then again the horse meat is really good for the cats, because the horses in Iceland are basically outside most or all of the year, and they dont eat anything else but vegetatition of the ground or hey so they are like game when you look at the meat. The fat in horse meat isnt hard. .
Im sorry this is hard for me to read, im a serious horse lover. In the states no one eats horse. Actually slaughtering horses in California for human consumption is against the law.
To me eating a horse would be the same as eating a cat!
post #20 of 25
I'd try it for my IBD cat if I had two things:
1. A freezer (I have an old vintage frigde where there's a tiny freezer that holds like one ice tray and a pint of ben and jerry's, but that's it)
2. Any counter space in my 7x5 foot kitchen.
post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by bengalbabe View Post
Im sorry this is hard for me to read, im a serious horse lover. In the states no one eats horse. Actually slaughtering horses in California for human consumption is against the law.
To me eating a horse would be the same as eating a cat!
I can understand your love for horses but I see it this way: Pigs are also lovely intelligent animals, so are cows and sheeps and still we slaughter them in their millions and eat them with no regret. To eat a horse is not a sign of a uncivilized culture, but rather that the food tabu is different. In Iceland it was actually forbidden to eat horse meat before the 20th century because it was seen as a heathen custom, since eating horse meat had been a part of pagan rituals. But when it was again allowed to eat horse people started eating them again.

The horse culture is also so much different here in Iceland. We only have one type of horse in this country, the Icelandic one that is a horse that was brought to the country by vikings and made stronger and sturdier by the environment, and is very similar to the original european horse. Even though there is a great deal of horses trained to ride, there are great big herds of horses that are basically wild and are kept in mountains and heaths, and those are the horses that we mostly eat. Of course there is the occasional riding horse that is slaughtered because of injury or other things, and instead of letting his meat go to waste he is eaten, simple as that. There is of course people in Iceland that are against eaten horses, but in my experience those are all people that have grown up in big towns with little experience of animals. The horse breeders that are more rural in mentality have no problem eating horse, and see it as a normal thing, kind of: why let it go to waste?

I hope this clears out why we eat horse meat in Iceland. They are considered pets in Usa and many european countries, but in many countries its considered barn animal as the pig and cow, and since its a herbivore I really cant see the link between eating a cat (carnivore) and a horse, but I understand why you would see it that way.
post #22 of 25
Thread Starter 
We definitely see where you are coming from its just we probably have a pet mentality when it comes to horses. Dog is popular in some countries but the same kind of pet block comes up.

I like to eat goat from time to time (Indian food is great) and my mom dosne't know how I do it and thinks it would be awful. Why though? Its just a barn animal, no different than any other.... So I can see where the same thought would go for horses.

People just see things in different lights.

As far as freezers go, if anyone has a regular sit-on top freezer (not huge but not teeny-tiny like what lionessrampant was describing) then its not to bad to do raw if you can find a local preprepared supplier. We keep 8lbs of meat in the freezer at any one time and make regular trips to replenish. We only have 3 cats so maybe it would be harder iwth more. It only takes up the door space for us. Just plain raw, the cats (3) would go through a pound a day, sometimes slightly more. With the salmon it stretches about double. So I go to pick up food every 1.5-2.5 weeks.
post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolarityBengals View Post
The vet told me the mercury content of salmon is not a concern, where mackerel it would be. Here was a little info I found:


Hmm I need to make sure I'm getting Alaskan salmon and not Atlantic.

I guess if the mackerel was farm raised then it wouldn't matter about mercury, but farm raised often are in poor conditions so might be less nutritious.
After reading this, I picked up a can of Alaskan salmon at the store yesterday, thinking maybe this would make the food more palatable for Etain since she loves salmon and she's being finicky about the venison/lamb raw food. One thing I noticed is that its preserved with salt, according to the label, about 270mg sodium per 1/4 c salmon. I was wondering if your vet has ever raised concerns about this? I don't know how much is too much for cats
post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by heidrun View Post
I can understand your love for horses but I see it this way: Pigs are also lovely intelligent animals, so are cows and sheeps and still we slaughter them in their millions and eat them with no regret. To eat a horse is not a sign of a uncivilized culture, but rather that the food tabu is different. In Iceland it was actually forbidden to eat horse meat before the 20th century because it was seen as a heathen custom, since eating horse meat had been a part of pagan rituals. But when it was again allowed to eat horse people started eating them again.

The horse culture is also so much different here in Iceland. We only have one type of horse in this country, the Icelandic one that is a horse that was brought to the country by vikings and made stronger and sturdier by the environment, and is very similar to the original european horse. Even though there is a great deal of horses trained to ride, there are great big herds of horses that are basically wild and are kept in mountains and heaths, and those are the horses that we mostly eat. Of course there is the occasional riding horse that is slaughtered because of injury or other things, and instead of letting his meat go to waste he is eaten, simple as that. There is of course people in Iceland that are against eaten horses, but in my experience those are all people that have grown up in big towns with little experience of animals. The horse breeders that are more rural in mentality have no problem eating horse, and see it as a normal thing, kind of: why let it go to waste?

I hope this clears out why we eat horse meat in Iceland. They are considered pets in Usa and many european countries, but in many countries its considered barn animal as the pig and cow, and since its a herbivore I really cant see the link between eating a cat (carnivore) and a horse, but I understand why you would see it that way.
I think in the USA it's a lot in the way they kill the horses that makes it really bad. Icelandic horses are rare here and when we see them it's a real treat for us. I have a friend that paid a whole bunch of money to have one imported here. I hear they are really fun to ride because they have so many gates.
Anyway im going really off topic.
post #25 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Etain View Post
After reading this, I picked up a can of Alaskan salmon at the store yesterday, thinking maybe this would make the food more palatable for Etain since she loves salmon and she's being finicky about the venison/lamb raw food. One thing I noticed is that its preserved with salt, according to the label, about 270mg sodium per 1/4 c salmon. I was wondering if your vet has ever raised concerns about this? I don't know how much is too much for cats
She didn't say anything about it being a problem. Those little cans (like tuna) have a very high salt content. These larger cans not so much. 270mg sodium dosne't sound to bad actually because I doubt they even eat a 1/4c a day as its mixed with the raw. Let me think about it... 1 can, 3 cats, 2 days, comes out to about 1/6 of a can per cat per day? So thats about 180mg of sodium from the salmon a day. I'm sure dry food is higher than that and probably even wet food. I don't know the sodium content of raw, probably nto to bad.
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