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It's Overwhelming.... - Page 2

post #31 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Renny
Most of the vets around here are of the mind set to do spay or neuter until 5 to 6 mos...it was even a huge battle for me to have Rambo done at 5 mos. We unfortunatly don't have the resources to foster all of our kittens till that age (and we have to take advantage of any vets that are willing to work with us!). We have to do what we can...and it would seem that with our method a few will still get through. Hopefully it's the vast minority!
If you do not do spay follow ups....you don't know how many of your cats are out there right now having kittens of their own and those kittens could then be having kittens and so forth...

What I would do is foster to adopt. The adoptor pays a fee...but they are considered fosters until the kitten reaches 5 months of age. Once the owners provide you with the spay/neuter certificate, the "foster" status changes to "owner". If the cat isn't spayed/neutered by 5 months of age...I would reclaim the kittens back and then have them spayed/neutered.



Katie
post #32 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Renny
THe director of our rescue has some farmers that will give her 3 or 4 litters a year but absolutely refuses to let her get his barn cats spayed and neutered (no charge!!!). Says they aren't as good of mousers if they're fixed. ARGH!!! So every year it's 15 or 20 kittens (or more) from just him every year that he expects us to vaccinate and get adopted.
What a load of bull hooey!! I have my 8 "barn" cats(fixed). They all hunt mice, catch them, & kill them! Of course, they don't eat them, mice are too gross to eat...they would much rather leave them on the front step for me to step on so I scream...

No matter how many you save, there will always be the moron who throws a kitten out of a moving vehicle, or whatever other sick thing people can come up with. If only they realized how many cats & kittens who are sweet, healthy, and cute get euthanized unwanted & unloved.

I know farmers like that & I made one of them go in & watch a cat of theirs be euthanized. The cat had been hit by a car & sat for days somewhere. Within a week all 15 cats of their were altered. I told them that is what happens to all those unwanted cats of theirs....and the ones in the shelter. He is now a big "adopt a farm cat" advocate for our shelter.

Katie, the method you described is what our shelter wants to do, but there are currently 3 cat foster homes including me...2 of which are full with pregnant mommas & their babies. We adopt out unaltered kittens/cats, & give out a spay/neuter certificate for a discounted altering. We keep track & if the pet isn't altered within a certain time period, we reclaim the animal. We cannot find a vet to fix younger than 5-6 months, either.
post #33 of 51
Thread Starter 
It sounds like a wonderful idea in theory for us, but practically impossible at this point. Any kitties that are "fostered" in my direct area (same town director lives in) are checked up on and considered just fosters until they are adopted (then they only pay the fee for hte s/n instead of the $80 adoption fee. But the market in the town for kitties is just to small so we drive over an hour into Toronto to touch on a bigger population. There is no way we could keep track over that great an area. Our director tries her hardest to stay in touch and she does have contact people in Toronto that do follow ups...It's the best we can do and better then doing nothing.


White cat lover...what an eye opener making him watch the kitty get put to sleep. I would love to shake these guys sometimes! All we can do is keep trying...and maybe if try to knock enough sense into their heads something will get through. Until then...it's either let him drown the kitties or take them in. Well...you can guess what option we chose. But good news for farm kitties...my first feral momma Millie was just adopted with another feral (spayed) girl for a ladies new barn. She's off to a great hunting ground and has befriended this other female!!!
post #34 of 51
just wanted to post about the "fixed kitties not making good mousers". i didn't even adopt Wonton cos i wanted a mouser-i adopted him cos he was a stray who crossed my path, and i fell in love. he's fixed, AND he's a bit overweight...and he's a great mouser! we have a little bit of a mouse problem in our apartment, and he's caught and killed two in the past six months, and i've rescued two more from him (i don't really want him to kill them). i honestly was shocked-i thought he was a lazybones lapcat, but turns out its true, those instincts never go away. So yeah...being fixed has nothing to do with it
post #35 of 51
Yeah I never understood the correlation people have with being altered and not being good hunters, the cat has to be hormonally charged to catch a mouse? My sister's beast, Baby , is going on 11 years old, has been fixed since kittenhood, and regularly brings home moles, bunnies, squirrels etc no lack of hunting skills there!
post #36 of 51
You need to find a vet who will alter them early.

I don't understand why they will not do it unless it's just too hard to perform the surgery? The little things are too small?

I've only been at this six weeks or so but I've not seen kittens in pain or discomfort, with any problems of any kind. My own little males were running around the next day.

Some of the kittens aren't even two pounds yet. My two weren't.

I would have a talk with some compassionate vet, and tell them what YOU are up against because he will not perform the surgery until five months. You may find one who will make an exception!!! Heck, there's got to be someone...
post #37 of 51
In the past when I have adopted out kitties, after screening the potential owner I have always felt confident that they will do what's required and best for their new pet. Unfortunately, people aren't always truthful, circumstances change, pets develop bad habits... That said, there are very few people I am 100% certain of when it comes to whether they will give that animal the quality of care that I want them to have over a lifetime. It would be nice to have every kitten that leaves the rescue already spayed or neutered, but if you can't trust an adopter to carry through on that part of the agreement, then can you believe them when they say they'll provide veterinary care, feed it, give it shelter from the heat/cold, etc? So do you stop adopting them out? No way. You do the best you can, which is what you're doing.
post #38 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Renny
Thank you everyone for your inspirational thoughts and kind words...You've made me cry. I'm going to save these posts and come back to them when ever I have rough days. It's wonderful to have this support network to help!!
We all need kind words sometimes when we are having a rough day. It's an excellent idea to keep this thread full of encouragement for all of the people that are working so hard to take care of stray and feral cats. Everyone that works in a shelter, fosters, or is involved in TNR, deserves kind words from all of us. You have my utmost respect.
post #39 of 51
Renny I wanted to let you know the day you posted I too was feeling very overwhelmed and was losing site of exactly why I was fostering. So you were not alone! I have 16 of my own and at the moment have 14 fosters. I just foster for the group but sometimes feel like they aren't listening to me. Sometimes I don't feel like they trust my judgment. I had to step back and remember why I do this. Because where would my ferals Snow White and Fergie be if I didn't want to take the time and help them? Where would Faith be if we weren't working on her trust issues and learning to get along with the others? Where would the little ones be if I hadn't decided that although I had reached what I thought was my limit I would find room for them? I had to figure out that if one person wasn't listening perhaps somebody else would. I had to decide that I live with these fosters and I know them better that anybody else. I try to educate those who just don't get the concept of spay and neuter. I am sure that there will be more days of feeling like it nevers end but when a little one wakes me up at 300 am purring I know I made a difference in his life! When I catch Faith playing with one of the other cats I know I made a difference for her. When one of my fosters moves on to their forever home a happy well adjusted cat I know I made a difference. And then the rest of it doesn't matter!

My fosters send out a great big thank you to those who foster!!!

Regina (Dozen2luv)
post #40 of 51
Thread Starter 
Thank you Regina, what a wonderful post. No matter how overwhelming the big picture is, I have to remember to take a reality check (which usually involves cuddling a few kitties) and re-focus myself. I have a limit to my fostering myself, in that during the school year the basement apartment of my house is rented out to a student, so I only foster from May to September during peak kitten season. I will continue to help out my rescue by volunteering a adoption fairs, and organize drives for litter and food. I have nothing but praise and admiration for those of you that do it full time.
post #41 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dozen2luv

My fosters send out a great big thank you to those who foster!!!

Regina (Dozen2luv)
Regina....fostering is a great way to help...but there are many ways to get involved. I find that volunteering at a feral cat clinic is especially rewarding as these are cats who would be having litter after litter after litter..but due to the clinic, we are able to reduce the number of breeding cats outdoors through spaying/neutering. We have already seen the impact to our kitten intake numbers.

Katie
post #42 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinder
It would be nice to have every kitten that leaves the rescue already spayed or neutered, but if you can't trust an adopter to carry through on that part of the agreement, then can you believe them when they say they'll provide veterinary care, feed it, give it shelter from the heat/cold, etc? So do you stop adopting them out? No way. You do the best you can, which is what you're doing.
Cinder..I can appreciate your perspective....however I do not believe that the majority of "oops" births were purposeful or from an individual who was intentionally irresponsible. More times than not...those same individuals can show you a spay date that they made in advance and somehow the cat got out. The only way to 100% guarentee that there will not be a chance that the cat could become pregnant is to go ahead and get it spayed.

Katie
post #43 of 51
Katie I hope you didn't take my thank you wrong. I have nothing but admiration for those of you who do the other work. The shelters, the clinics taking care of the ferals. My contribution is fostering. taking the kittens to their adoption shows and helping out the rescue when I can.

Regina
post #44 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dozen2luv
Katie I hope you didn't take my thank you wrong. I have nothing but admiration for those of you who do the other work. The shelters, the clinics taking care of the ferals. My contribution is fostering. taking the kittens to their adoption shows and helping out the rescue when I can.

Regina
Regina...I totally understood and appreciated your post.

Katie
post #45 of 51
Friskycatz is a liar. She is not working with a rescue or an exec director of a rescue. She is also not moving.

She is a stay at home mom of two kids with a vivid imagination. Do not take anything she says seriously. She has deep serious issues
post #46 of 51
Talltales, is it necessary to start name calling on what was a very heartwarming post? Please just stick to the subject!
post #47 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Renny View Post

Just got some more frustrating news....at the adoption fair yesterday some people returned kittens that they adopted a year ago from us (all kittens come with voucher to be s/n if they aren't old enough to be done - voucher is for 50). Well all of these now 1+ year olds have not been neutered, and in one case they were also returned with a litter of kittens of their own. I'm glad i wasn't there to meet these people...I might have snapped and said something I would regret later (or maybe not regretted...)
We don't adopt out anything that hasn't been fixed. They are done when they reach 2 pounds, male and female and we haven't had any problems with them being done that early.

As for mousers.. my Alley was spayed and she brought me a critter every night and left it on the rug next to my bed for me to find in the morning
post #48 of 51
Thread Starter 
Unfortunately all the vets in this area refuse to spay/neuter until the kitty is 4 to 5 months old. The rescue is still working trying to find ones that will work younger then that. I think more education about pediatric spay/neuter is needed in Canada. I had to fight to get both of mine done before 6 months of age.
post #49 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Renny View Post
Unfortunately all the vets in this area refuse to spay/neuter until the kitty is 4 to 5 months old. The rescue is still working trying to find ones that will work younger then that. I think more education about pediatric spay/neuter is needed in Canada. I had to fight to get both of mine done before 6 months of age.
Hi Renny....that's unfortunate....the rescue I volunteer with spays/neuters at 8 weeks...although we tend to wait until 9/10 weeks. It is great to be able to send kittens into homes knowing that they will never add to the overpopulation.

Katie
post #50 of 51
Thread Starter 
I totally agree....but the ingrained belief at the moment of vets in this area is waiting till 6 months. I had to pay extra for a pediatric spay on my two...I had read here about the recovery being so much easier the younger they were...and it was. I guess it will take time to change the thinking in this area....
post #51 of 51
All,

I can totally relate to everything you said. My husband and I have worked with rescue for a long time. This year has to be one of the worst. We currently have 8 foster babies. 5 of which came from a mama that we tried so hard to trap before she got pregnant. That didn't happen. She was so trap savvy. After she brought the babies around we managed to get them all (5) and we got her too! Woo hoo. She's a tortie, not 100% feral, but feral enough that you can't touch her. We TNR'd her and I take care of her every day. She's in a safe place, the company that was there isn't there any more and the building is vacant, but maintained well. HER mama was there on and off, and has 3 kittens out there. That's the next project. The sad news is that the mama of the 3 died yesterday. I found her laying in the parking lot on the side of the building. My guess is that she was bitten by a raccoon a few days ago and had a bad infection. There was no blood, but her belly and backside was wet. I've seen this before with a feral who was bitten and subsequently had to be euthanized. It was a terrible start to my day having to find her. We came back after work and got her and took her to our vet for a proper burial. There's no way I could just leave her there.

But even with the sadness, there are good people out there. Tuesday morning I found a box behind the pole where I have the feeding station. It was hidden from the street, as the feeder is. In the box were several large feeding dishes and one of those big food-for-a-week feeders. There was a note addressed to 'The great people who care for the wild kitties, hope you can use these'. How cool is that? The rescue group can certainly use them.

As I said we have 8 fosters (all around 14 weeks). 5 from the one litter are lovebugs. Should have no trouble being adopted. The other 3 came from a feral mom 'with an attitude', or so I was told. At first all 3 were hissy, nasty and stay-away-from-me-or-I'll-attack-you. Now, a month later, 2 out of the 3 are in your face, wanting attention. The third one, however, has not made any progress. She will come out from hiding and be in the samea area with you, but when you reach for her: goodbye. Our rescue shelter will take her when a spot opens up. They have a lot like her and have 'socialization' volunteers that might be able to help. If not, she'll live a happy life at the shelter.

Sorry to ramble, but it's so nice to have a place to talk with others who do the same thing and have similar stories. Don't despair, even when it is overwhelming (been there done that). Somehow, you'll get through it. We are the only friends these kitties have in most cases.
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