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How do you deworm feral cat?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I have a feral cat that lives in my house. I have had her for two years, but have never been able to touch her. I had a vet come into my house and trap her and have her nutered and declawed and given her shots while she was at the clinic, but I know she was never dewormed. My problem is that when I trapped her, she had five kittens. I raised all of them, gave them there shots and adopted four of them to two special families. I kept the male kitten so the feral mother would be content. My problems is that now the kitten has developed feline asthma. I have run blood tests and had 3 x-rays to confirm. His lungs are clouded. He began coughing several months ago after we did some painting in the house. It seemed to trigger the cough. I thought it was fur balls, but soon relized he was in trouble. I keep researching to find a cure and am wondering if he didn't get worms that the two of them are passing through the litter box. I've never seen any, but I have watched the mother cat and some times she has a nerve twitch. Her body seems to twitch. Can anyone help me and tell me how to deworm them both.
post #2 of 16
Hopefully someone with more feral experience will come on, but the only thing I Can think of is if they will eat either wet food or something like tuna, then getting worming granules and putting it in their food. Dont know if this is safe with cats you dont know the weight of though.
post #3 of 16
Sorry if this seems blunt ,but why on earth did you de-claw your cat if its still feral?
You know if that cat ever gets out it will probably starve to death?
post #4 of 16
easiest with spot on. One drop on the neck.

Revolution / Stronghold takes most parasites and worms, save tapeworms.

Bob Martin? takes tapeworms.

Ie best to combine...
post #5 of 16
You declawed a FERAL cat? Why?

I agree spot on treatment I think would be best. That or else adding liquid dewormer to her food. Wasn't she dewormed when you had her spayed and you know, the other thing...?
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mary Ellen Shef
I have a feral cat that lives in my house. I have had her for two years, but have never been able to touch her. I had a vet come into my house and trap her and have her nutered and declawed and given her shots while she was at the clinic, but I know she was never dewormed. My problem is that when I trapped her, she had five kittens. I raised all of them, gave them there shots and adopted four of them to two special families. I kept the male kitten so the feral mother would be content. My problems is that now the kitten has developed feline asthma. I have run blood tests and had 3 x-rays to confirm. His lungs are clouded. He began coughing several months ago after we did some painting in the house. It seemed to trigger the cough. I thought it was fur balls, but soon relized he was in trouble. I keep researching to find a cure and am wondering if he didn't get worms that the two of them are passing through the litter box. I've never seen any, but I have watched the mother cat and some times she has a nerve twitch. Her body seems to twitch. Can anyone help me and tell me how to deworm them both.
I would recommend that you trap her again and take her in to the vet...they will probably give her some strongid.

Katie
post #7 of 16
Welcome to TCS! What a great story you have - about rescuing a feral and allowing her to live in your home for 2 years, even though she doesn't return affection by giving you back-rubs & head-butts & keep your feet warm at night in winter.
As for the worming, what does your vet recommend? If you do manage to trap the mom cat, she may become even more distant & distrustful afterwards, but i understand the concern about proper dosages. I do hope the son gets over his asthma soon.
Just in case you haven't thought of it, be sure that the litter is UNSCENTED, and that you don't use air fresheners & limit other artificial scents, such as laundry detergent used for bedding, etc. This will help his poor little lungs heal. Asthma is no fun, I know that first hand.
please keep us updated on how the kits in your home are doing! Your experience with getting them wormed will be useful for others here
post #8 of 16
Let's not get into the great declawing debate here It is just `the norm' for many people and there is a distinct possibility that the OP just didn't know about all the issues surrounding it. We are about education here, not making people feel badly about their decisions, and I'm sure after some time on this board she will be more informed about this issue. In the meantime, Mary, welcome and stick around. We'd love to hear more about your kitty
post #9 of 16
Why did Mary Ellen declave do many of us ask.

I thought a while, I think I know why.

1. It must be very difficult to take the clavs by "scissors" on a semiferal cat... Our kind friendly Muskis pretends he is going to bite when we are working with his claws. And he hurries away as soon he understand what we want to do... Not hard to imagine how it must be with this shy semiferal.

2. It was an act of acceptance: we ARE keeping this cat as our own, as an indoor cat - untouchable semiferal or not. And we do pay the vet everyting necessary for this our own homecat.
It was an act of Love.

So is my interpretation of what Mary Allen did.
post #10 of 16
How is declawing an act of love in any way shape or form? That doesn't make sense. Whether or not she is keeping the cat indoors, declawing is not an act of love at all. It is an inhumane thing to do to an animal.
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jen
How is declawing an act of love in any way shape or form? That doesn't make sense. Whether or not she is keeping the cat indoors, declawing is not an act of love at all. It is an inhumane thing to do to an animal.
You are missing the whole point Jen.

WE both do know declawing isnt no good. Many people doesnt. Them believing indoor home cat = preferably declawed by a good owner.

Mary Ellen didnt knew declawing was no good. And Mary Ellen having big heart decided to accept this semiferal as own and proper indoor cat, not sparing any reasonable costs to do this.

Even paying the vet for declawing.

That is the paradox here. Doing a wrong thing - but for the right reasons...
A sad story yes, but oh so beatiful. I want to believe in it, and please Jen dont destroy it...
post #12 of 16
I would like to comment on this Thread.
But before I do I want to make myself clear, I am in no way judging the op on her opening post as I really would like to believe that she had the best interests of the cat in her heart.
As does anybody who can share their home with a feral cat.
I was shocked to read of a feral cat being de-clawed especially as it is still feral,Yes the lady could have a legitimate reason for having the cat de-clawed,e.g Injury or deformity.

But knowing the stress and terror a feral cat must feel when captured I believe,for whatever reason injury/deformity or to protect the furniture,the vet who advised the o.p and the surgeon who performed the surgery had an obligation to explain to the o.p the implications of de-clawing a feral cat and the implications for this cat in its progress of socialisation and the post operative treatment and medication of this cat.

I believe the vet and/or surgeon failed in their duty.

By doing the surgery I believe the vet and/or surgeon has done more harm to this cat and I believe that is nothing short of animal abuse.
post #13 of 16
Hello Stefan, Do you know if spot on - de-worming is available in Europe and what the name would be of the product. I need desperately to de-worm our ferals but I do not want to give them more bad experiences of human hands. There have been so many other unpleasant treatments for my small ones. The only de-wormer I can give them in the food is not strong enough to take the nasty worms. I de-wormed them the first time four weeks ago and they hated me for a week. Now it is high time to repeat it but with the older ones (11 weeks) it would be a full days work just to lift them up and I am still healing from the last antibiotic treatment and spraying against flees. Now I can pet them again if I don't attempt to lift them up and I really don't want to destroy that trust.
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malena
Hello Stefan, Do you know if spot on - de-worming is available in Europe and what the name would be of the product.
These I already mentioned should do:

Stronghold / Revolution - is the same, Stronghold in Europe, Revoultion in USA I believe.

Bob Martin is made in UK, so it should be accessible in whole EU (perhaps not in Sweden though...).
http://www.bobmartin.co.uk/


I see some here mentions Strongid, but it seems to be for horses.
post #15 of 16
Bob Martin aren't very effective though. There is a new Spot on for worms in the UK from vets, but off the top of my head, I can't think of the name of it.
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by booktigger
Bob Martin aren't very effective though.
It depends how do you mean it.

Bob Martins is against tapeworms (the "broad-band" worms), not the others.

So you must kombine with Stronghold/revolution to achieve good effect.

Or do you booktigger mean Bob Martin not effective against tapeworms either??
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