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kitty wants too much food and will do anything to get it!

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Our cat wants to eat all the time and if we leave food out, he'll jump up and get it. It's like he never learns, He know's its wrong, but he'll do it anyway. If we don't watch, he'll eat the puppies food. He's 2 years old, weighs 14 lbs, and we feed him about 1/2 cup total of dry and wet food daily. What should we do?
Any help would much appreciated
A
post #2 of 19
It doesn't sound like you're feeding him enough to me... but I don't know what kind of food you are feeding.

I feed a little over 1/3 of a cup of wet and all the dry she wants. Some days she doesn't touch the dry, some days she eats a cup. She is half the size of yours though.

Why don't you try increasing her wet a little bit, and see if he stops acting like he's starving? I don't see how it's "wrong" for your cat to be hungry, and he's telling you the best way he can.

What do the labels of the food say to feed for a 14-lb cat? What kind of food is it?
post #3 of 19
What brand/kind of food is he getting? If it isn't a higher quality food he probably wants more because it doesn't have enough protein to fill him up. Apparently, the higher the protein and better the quality of the food, the less they need to eat to be satisfied. And some cats just eat more. Is he a big boned or long cat? A larger breed?

I feed my small girl a little less than 3 oz. of good wet food between two daily meals (morning and evening) and a cup (at least) of high quality dry food to nibble on throughout the day and night. She doesn't always finish her wet food but she does go through at least a cup of dry in 24 hours. She is still growing so I guess she needs it.

And no matter what, make sure the cat has plenty of water.
post #4 of 19
First of all, have you checked with the vet? Is he overweight (like people, weight only tells you so much - size and body type are important, too)? Does the vet think the food you are giving him is appropriate for him?

Second of all, can you stop free-feeding? This can be a pain at first, but once a routine is established, it's ok (I had to do it, so I'm know it's not fun to have to start).

Third, if you only have 1 cat and 1 puppy, can you seperate them at feeding time?

Alternatively, maybe have an indoor 'dog house' with a collar actived key (you can get them for cat doors), with the key in your puppy's collar and the puppy food only available in there. That way the puppy can feed as he likes and you can feed your cat at set times of the day. This option would probably require a bit of money (though probably less than you think) and some elbow grease, but might be the best solution all around - puppy eats puppy food, kitty doesn't, you don't have to corral them both at food time, etc.

Good luck.

ETA: Alternatively is an alternative to option three, not to going to the vet - if you haven't done that, that should be your first port of call.
post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
Hey, thanks for the quick reply. So Little Man is a medium framed tabby. Our vet says he's too heavy for his age and we needed to cut back his intake to 1/4 c, twice a day. His belly touches the floor when he's sits or lays and he lays on his back, legs spread.
We feed him 1/4 cup of Royal Canin for adults and a half 5.5 oz can of Felindae wet food each day. If we put out too much food for him, he'll eat all of it. I've had nibblers before, and I tell you, this cat will eat everything in front of him, like a gold fish. He'll eat a bean if i drop it. He's raided our food after eating his own.
post #6 of 19
I would give him more wet. Or all wet and cut back on the dry. Wet is healthier and increases their water intake which is good especially for males. It also doesn't have as many fats and carbs as dry food does.
post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 
We've been to the vet, but they've only told us so much. I just thought it would be interesting to post our problems here as well.
What's free feeding?
We do separate the puppy and cat during feeding time, I was just trying to stress how hungry the cat is all the time.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Satai
First of all, have you checked with the vet? Is he overweight (like people, weight only tells you so much - size and body type are important, too)? Does the vet think the food you are giving him is appropriate for him?

Second of all, can you stop free-feeding? This can be a pain at first, but once a routine is established, it's ok (I had to do it, so I'm know it's not fun to have to start).

Third, if you only have 1 cat and 1 puppy, can you seperate them at feeding time?

Alternatively, maybe have an indoor 'dog house' with a collar actived key (you can get them for cat doors), with the key in your puppy's collar and the puppy food only available in there. That way the puppy can feed as he likes and you can feed your cat at set times of the day. This option would probably require a bit of money (though probably less than you think) and some elbow grease, but might be the best solution all around - puppy eats puppy food, kitty doesn't, you don't have to corral them both at food time, etc.

Good luck.

ETA: Alternatively is an alternative to option three, not to going to the vet - if you haven't done that, that should be your first port of call.
post #8 of 19
Free feeding is leaving food available for your pet to eat during the day/night/both.
post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Jiggle Pant
We do separate the puppy and cat during feeding time, I was just trying to stress how hungry the cat is all the time.
Is he actually hungry all the time?

By which I mean is he definately eating out of a sensation of hunger, or is it for another reason, like boredom?
post #10 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Satai
Is he actually hungry all the time?

By which I mean is he definately eating out of a sensation of hunger, or is it for another reason, like boredom?
When I go to the kitchen, he looks up at me and MEOW's bigtime, like he needs food or the world will end. I don't think he's bored, we play with him alot and he and the puppy have established a great relationship.

Not sure if this matters or not, but he's NOT a very affectionate kitty, He'll bite if we pet him for more than 2 seconds (unless he thinks he getting food) and he really hates to be picked up. But we love him anyways
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Jiggle Pant
When I go to the kitchen, he looks up at me and MEOW's bigtime, like he needs food or the world will end. I don't think he's bored, we play with him alot and he and the puppy have established a great relationship.

Not sure if this matters or not, but he's NOT a very affectionate kitty, He'll bite if we pet him for more than 2 seconds (unless he thinks he getting food) and he really hates to be picked up. But we love him anyways
"But we love him anyways" - that's the important part!

If it was a human child, I would be seriously concerned that it was Prader-Willi syndrome, but I've never heard of an equivelent in cats.

Have you mentioned that he always thinks he's hungry to the vet?
post #12 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Satai
"But we love him anyways" - that's the important part!

If it was a human child, I would be seriously concerned that it was Prader-Willi syndrome, but I've never heard of an equivelent in cats.

Have you mentioned that he always thinks he's hungry to the vet?
PWS is a great way to describe some of his symptoms!

I've mentioned it to two different vets actually. Their attitude's were "that's just how some cats are." They must be dog people.

I wish we could get him some therapy or something.
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Jiggle Pant
PWS is a great way to describe some of his symptoms!

I've mentioned it to two different vets actually. Their attitude's were "that's just how some cats are." They must be dog people.

I wish we could get him some therapy or something.
You might be able to. Have you consider a feline behaviourist?

They often have a lot of experience with oddball feline traits that can't be treated medically.
post #14 of 19
Thread Starter 
We just can't afford it right now, its also tough to find someone good in the south east. We went to a feline specialist to discuss some of his many unusual behavoirs, including his compulsive belly licking, butwe were given the same advice the normal vet gave. I'm making him sound like a serious problems child!
post #15 of 19
Some behaviorists are not as expensive as you would think they would be. Have you looked around? How about getting him a buddy. I forgot if you mentioned if you have other cats but he may eat out of boredom.
post #16 of 19
Thread Starter 
I've actually looked and couldn't find anyone here in charlotte, nc. Atlanta, Ga, yes (4 hour drive)
When i got him, i had another cat, who i gave to my parents. She was a nibbler, but he would eat all of her food and his butt would stink up the place after eating everything in sight. I think that may be where his weight gain began. Trust me, I would love to get an additional cat, but with the puppy chihuahua, It may be a while before we can handle another pet.
post #17 of 19
I've read on here before about putting the cats dry food in a treat ball so they have to do a little exercise to get it out. That may help a little with your furbabe to delay him wolfing his food right down.
Also... there are many posts here about how to help the chubby ones get in a little exercise like placing their food dish at the top or bottom of a flight of stairs so they have to work for it.
If you live in a two story house that might be a good idea for his wet food.
Just little things like that to kind of drag out his meal times may help a bit.

My first thought was hyper thyroid, but when that is the case the overeaters don't get fat. Has he been checked for hypothyroid lately though? That might be something to consider. It also may be a good idea to have his blood sugar checked, not just once, but a kind of series in case his blood sugar is bouncing up and down.

I can say from experience that one simple check on thyroid or diabetes could miss a problem if there are fluctuations and it just happens to be normal at that time.

Good luck with finding the root of his hunger.
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Jiggle Pant
I've actually looked and couldn't find anyone here in charlotte, nc. Atlanta, Ga, yes (4 hour drive)

Are you sure? I've known people who have consulted behaviorists up here in Chapel Hill, surely there must be plenty of them roaming round Charlotte.
post #19 of 19
Perhaps you could try giving him a larger amount of lite/weight management food rather than 1/2 cup of regular food? That way he would be eating more and feeling fuller and still the weight issue would be tackled. The cats I know would be miserable and feel starving on 1/2 cup a day... I'm not surprised he's trying to get more food anywhere he can.

I think that vet was right. Many cats are not lap cats and only like to be petted for a minute or two. It's perfectly normal. They usually give you some warning signs when you've petted them too long, and if you ignore the signs they'll nip at you.
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