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If I may be so bold...

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
I am reposting a message from a few days ago. I only got 1 helpful response but would like more input. (I will try to make this post shorter)

Veruca's kittens are almost 7 weeks. They are doing great (except the runt who is a big scaredy cat) They eat wet and dry food and use litterboxes. 2 of them are placed and the family is interested in taking them home this week. The 2 they chose are the largest and most gregarious. They eat wet and dry food and use the litterbox. But are they ready?
post #2 of 22
Well unfortunately, I can only offer input but I thought, again, this is just me. I thought kittens should be weaned around three months or 12 weeks. Isn't 7 weeks a mite early for dry food? Maybe wet food. But I am so so sure that someone will help tell you what to feed your precious ones.
post #3 of 22
8 weeks is the age kittens from the shelter go up for adoption. If they were on their own, I would say to give it at least another week or two, but since they're going together, and are eating and using the litter box fine, then I guess it's ok!

Are you getting them spayed/neutered before they go to their new home? That can be done at 8 weeks/2 pounds.
post #4 of 22
I had dry kitten food out for a mother cat and her kittens I was fostering - the dry food was really for the mother cat, but a couple of the kittens started trying to eat it at 5 weeks. They were so cute - they would carefully choose one piece of dry food, carefully chew it, then eventually swallow, then choose another piece.... The whole eating thing took a while!

By 7 weeks, they were all solidly eating dry food, and were not at all interested in wet food. I tried mixing KMR in with it hopgint that might make it more appealing, but they turned their little noses up at it and went back to the dry food.
post #5 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahp
8 weeks is the age kittens from the shelter go up for adoption. If they were on their own, I would say to give it at least another week or two, but since they're going together, and are eating and using the litter box fine, then I guess it's ok!

Are you getting them spayed/neutered before they go to their new home? That can be done at 8 weeks/2 pounds.
The new forever mom/owner will be getting them neutered. She is my best friend and a responsible cat lover. She is taking two males and her resident cats are all fixed, but I'm sure she will get it done as soon as they adjust or when she takes them in for their 3 week booster vacc. (Her two babies are just shy of 2 lbs as of last Saturday)
post #6 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ms_joshica
Well unfortunately, I can only offer input but I thought, again, this is just me. I thought kittens should be weaned around three months or 12 weeks. Isn't 7 weeks a mite early for dry food? Maybe wet food. But I am so so sure that someone will help tell you what to feed your precious ones.
They started eating momcat's dry food on their own accord starting at 4.5 weeks - in addition to nursing of coarse. Weaning generally starts around 4 to 5 weeks. They've always been offered wet food, but some prefer dry.
post #7 of 22
No - ideally kittens should be kept with mom and siblings till around 10-12 weeks of age. They need time to socialize with each other and learn how to be a cat.

I'd hang on to them for another month. Also during that time you can establish GOOD house manners (re clawing, climbing curtains, etc.). My rexes (left home at 4 months or older) were taught house manners and none of the new owners ever had a problem - some were amazed they didn't try to climb on curtains like other kittens they owned in the past
post #8 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenKitty45
No - ideally kittens should be kept with mom and siblings till around 10-12 weeks of age. They need time to socialize with each other and learn how to be a cat.

I'd hang on to them for another month. Also during that time you can establish GOOD house manners (re clawing, climbing curtains, etc.). My rexes (left home at 4 months or older) were taught house manners and none of the new owners ever had a problem - some were amazed they didn't try to climb on curtains like other kittens they owned in the past
I agree with GoldenKitty that if you can hold on to them until they are 10-12 weeks...that would be ideal.

Katie
post #9 of 22
Definately agree with the 2 posts above. They need to be with mom until at least 10 weeks. The reason shelters seperate them so early is because they need the room, they need cats out of there quickley.
post #10 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenKitty45
No - ideally kittens should be kept with mom and siblings till around 10-12 weeks of age. They need time to socialize with each other and learn how to be a cat.

I'd hang on to them for another month. Also during that time you can establish GOOD house manners (re clawing, climbing curtains, etc.). My rexes (left home at 4 months or older) were taught house manners and none of the new owners ever had a problem - some were amazed they didn't try to climb on curtains like other kittens they owned in the past
Will the cats learn proper behavior from the adult cats they are going to live with? They are learning "room" manners here. LOL They have a suite with 2 bedrooms and a bathroom.

I have to say, I cannot let all 7 these kittens come out to learn house manners. I have 4 other cats and 4500 square feet of house. Too much space for 2lb kitties to roam. I want to do what's best for these guys...it almost seems like keeping them much longer will bore them. The 2 of them are going to live in a big house with 5 young adult cats and they will have lots of loving attention from their human mom and dad. I guess I'm excited for my Stripe and Jazzy to start their new great life. Their forever "parents" have been over to see them several times since their birth and are excited to spoil and love them in their own home too!
post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by pxxiegirl
Will the cats learn proper behavior from the adult cats they are going to live with? I have to say, I cannot let all 7 these kittens come out to learn house manners. They are learning "room" manners here. LOL They have a suite with 2 bedrooms and a bathroom. I have 4 other cats and 4500 square feet of house. Too much space for 2lb kitties to roam. I want to do what's best for these guys...it almost seems like keeping them much longer will bore them. The 2 of them are going to live in a big house with 5 young adult cats and they will have lots of loving attention from their human mom and dad. I guess I'm excited for my Stripe and Jazzy to start their new great life. Their forever "parents" have been over to see them several times since their birth and are excited to spoil and love them in their own home too!
I would still recommend holding on to them...they are "almost" 7 weeks...in most states...kittens cannot be placed until they are at least 8 weeks of age. Even though you may see them as being bored....they are still learning from their siblings and from mom. Oftentimes, seperation from siblings and mom too early does more damage then giving them extra time with their siblings/mom. I'm sure their new parents are anxious to have them join their family...but let's give the kittens a little more time.

Katie
post #12 of 22
I have to agree with everyone else, if they have a momma cat they should stay with her for at least another week or two. Kirra came to our home at 7 weeks but she had no mommy cat and was raised by hand, so there really was no big change for her other than she is a single cat now, but she was with 12 other kittens, so it was better for her, more attention. BUT had she had a mommy i would have loved to bring her home, once she had a bit more time with mommy to learn the ropes.

I used to rescue and there is a difference I find in personality for a cat taken to early from momma, than one who stays a bit longer. The ones taken to early, or who dont have a momma tend to be clingier, basically more nurotic (which isnt a bad thing persay) but ones who stay with mommy tend to be calmer and more at ease with things.

In the end its up to you, but i would let em stay with mom at least another week.
post #13 of 22
When kitten buyers question, why we keep our kittens 12-14 weeks, we link them to this article, it list many reasons of the importance in keeping Mom and littermates together up to 12 weeks.
http://www.breedlist.com/faq/young.html
As well, may I suggest pediatric spay and neuter, before they go to their homes. It is a shorter healing time with Mom and littermates, and if the families they go to, happen to get busy, there is no need to worry about an accidental pregnancy if spay or neuter is delayed. If you have any questions or concerns on early altering, please check this link.
http://www.winnfelinehealth.org/heal...ay-neuter.html

I also recommend a full check into the families, find out how they feel about issues such as declawing, or allowing a kitten/cat outdoors unattended, if they have had past pets, and if so where are they now? It may seem overboard to some, but it is a good way to ensure the babies go to good forever homes.
Good Luck.
post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahp
8 weeks is the age kittens from the shelter go up for adoption. If they were on their own, I would say to give it at least another week or two, but since they're going together, and are eating and using the litter box fine, then I guess it's ok!



We had five kittens on Mother's Day. I let one go at 7 1/2 weeks, the second went at 8 1/2 weeks and the last one will go tonight at 10 weeks. We are keeping two The two that were adopted first are doing fine.

All of the kittens were eating dry kitten food and using the litter box at 5-6 weeks. I never even gave them wet they took straight to the dry food that was there for momma. I felt they were ready to go. If they had not caught on to the food and the litter so quick I would have held on to them longer. I also have other adult cats so they got to socialize quite a bit.

I say go with your gut. It sounds like your kitties are doing fine and since they are going together I myself don't see a problem with it.
post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by AsecretK


We had five kittens on Mother's Day. I let one go at 7 1/2 weeks, the second went at 8 1/2 weeks and the last one will go tonight at 10 weeks. We are keeping two The two that were adopted first are doing fine.

All of the kittens were eating dry kitten food and using the litter box at 5-6 weeks. I never even gave them wet they took straight to the dry food that was there for momma. I felt they were ready to go. If they had not caught on to the food and the litter so quick I would have held on to them longer. I also have other adult cats so they got to socialize quite a bit.

I say go with your gut. It sounds like your kitties are doing fine and since they are going together I myself don't see a problem with it.
There is more to being ready then eating solid food and using a litterbox...and shelter's frankly HAVE to get their kittens out or else they are euthanized. The other benefit of waiting until 10-12 weeks is that you may be able to find a vet clinic who will spay/neuter the kittens before you place them...thus you don't have to worry about following up to ensure the kittens are fixed. Our rescue is now placing kittens at 10 weeks, after they have been fixed.

Katie
post #16 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FamilytimeRags
When kitten buyers question, why we keep our kittens 12-14 weeks, we link them to this article, it list many reasons of the importance in keeping Mom and littermates together up to 12 weeks.
http://www.breedlist.com/faq/young.html
As well, may I suggest pediatric spay and neuter, before they go to their homes. It is a shorter healing time with Mom and littermates, and if the families they go to, happen to get busy, there is no need to worry about an accidental pregnancy if spay or neuter is delayed. If you have any questions or concerns on early altering, please check this link.
http://www.winnfelinehealth.org/heal...ay-neuter.html

I also recommend a full check into the families, find out how they feel about issues such as declawing, or allowing a kitten/cat outdoors unattended, if they have had past pets, and if so where are they now? It may seem overboard to some, but it is a good way to ensure the babies go to good forever homes.
Good Luck.
They are only going to homes of people I know personally and know how they are with pets. I already turned down a co-worker who wanted two kittens because she has a doggie door and 2 rambuncious young boys.
post #17 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TNR1
There is more to being ready then eating solid food and using a litterbox...and shelter's frankly HAVE to get their kittens out or else they are euthanized. The other benefit of waiting until 10-12 weeks is that you may be able to find a vet clinic who will spay/neuter the kittens before you place them...thus you don't have to worry about following up to ensure the kittens are fixed. Our rescue is now placing kittens at 10 weeks, after they have been fixed.

Katie
No need to worry. Our kitties are staying put until they are at least 9 weeks old. The person taking Stripe and Jazz is my best friend and she wants what's best for the kittens too. We just plain didn't know, that's why I came here to ask. I will offer to take her two with to the clinic where I am taking the rest of them, but she actually has a vet she has used for all her pets. Our families get together almost every weekend so I will know everything about these guys as they grow up.
post #18 of 22
You can let all the kittens out for a supervised period of time - say and hour or so twice a day. While they may learn some things from older cats, its a lot better to do it yourself as far as scratching furniture/climbing curtains.

My largest litter was 6 kittens with about 5-6 adult cats and they all were running around fine. The kittens were allowed outside their bedroom for supervised time only - not all day with no one to watch them.
post #19 of 22
Yay! I'm glad you decided to keep them a little longer. In addition to the social benefits, they will also be bigger and stronger, so if they happen to catch a little bug in the new home, they will have a better chance of fighting it off.

You will see a big difference in the kittens in the next few weeks. And I agree with limited time free in the home. Or maybe bring two at a time into another bedroom or the family area. This gives them new experiences, without making your entire house a kitten jungle gym!
post #20 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beckiboo
Yay! I'm glad you decided to keep them a little longer. In addition to the social benefits, they will also be bigger and stronger, so if they happen to catch a little bug in the new home, they will have a better chance of fighting it off.

You will see a big difference in the kittens in the next few weeks. And I agree with limited time free in the home. Or maybe bring two at a time into another bedroom or the family area. This gives them new experiences, without making your entire house a kitten jungle gym!
What should I do with the resident cats? They haven't seen a kitty in the house before. Do adult cats react differently to new kittens than they react to a new adult cat? Mine are actually all really friendly, except Dot who is giving Veruca a hard time.
post #21 of 22
They are all different. Just supervise the introductions. Most adults seem to be more afraid of the kittens then attack them. Some take to them from the begining. Don't worry if they hiss or smack the kittens when they come close - kittens have to learn to respect older adult cats and not just their mother.
post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by TNR1
There is more to being ready then eating solid food and using a litterbox...and shelter's frankly HAVE to get their kittens out or else they are euthanized. The other benefit of waiting until 10-12 weeks is that you may be able to find a vet clinic who will spay/neuter the kittens before you place them...thus you don't have to worry about following up to ensure the kittens are fixed. Our rescue is now placing kittens at 10 weeks, after they have been fixed.

Katie
I know that there is more to it than just eating solid food and using the litter box.

I have other cats and the younger ones socialized with the kittens all the time. I have an upstairs bedroom with no way to block it off. ( I have a pretty small house so there was no where else to put them)

I put the kittens in a large pen in my room when they were about three weeks old (with a den of course) and the three of my younger cats socialized with the kittens all the time. They also groomed them and sometimes slept with them (and ate their food..lol) I was surprised the momma even allowed this but she didn't seem to mind at all.

At 5 weeks they were free to roam out of the pen and were socializing more and more. By the time they were six weeks they were freely roaming the entire house (except the basement) with all the other cats. They are a very advanced litter for their age.

I would not have let them go if I didn't feel they were ready.

I am glad that pxxiegirl feel she needs them to stay longer. I didn't realize until I read her other posts that the kittens had not been socialized with her other cats so I agree that they need more socialization time.
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