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Purina ONE Kitten Food-Dry or Canned?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I have a 2 month old kitten whom I feed Purina ONE. Should I feed her dry food or canned?
post #2 of 18
I would do a mixture of both. Adding canned to the diet helps add extra protein and moisture. Have you considered switching to a higher quality food? If Purina ONE works for you, stick with it...I was just curious
post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
I would LUV to, however, it's to expensive so Purina ONE is the best I can do. Thanks for the info though.
post #4 of 18
I've never seen purina one canned.. Purina only seems to make friskies canned (which I have seen kitten version BTW in one store only!) fancy feast or purina pro plan. I believe fancy feast and friskies wet are ?good for all life stages.
Anyway, I believe cats should have some wet in their diet. Mine won't really eat the high quality stuff, so they are fed a small bit of friskies everyday.

BTW I don't know what is available out of the US.
post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunshine'sKid
I would LUV to, however, it's to expensive so Purina ONE is the best I can do. Thanks for the info though.
I recommend both also ... If you have a Big petstore like Petco look around many of the higher end food s are in the price range of One
post #6 of 18
Please don't take this as being mean. I love cats and am on a fixed income myself so I understand the costs involved. The most important thing is to start your kitten out with the best quality food available. There really is no perfect food made by manufacturers of cat food, but why feed lousy food to a kitten who needs all the nutrition it can get for a good start. Always look at the first five ingredients on the label. If any of them are by-products, don't use it. If they are something cats shouldn't have, don't use it. My suggestion would be to feed canned Wellness. If you must feed dry try Propac NOT Proplan. Big difference in quality and not big difference in price. You will pay in the long run with vet bills if you feed poor quality food, plain and simple. Another good canned is Nature's Variety. Both Wellness and Nature's Variety canned are grain-free. Natural balance is sold at regular pet stores and is much better than anything Purina produces. All my best.
post #7 of 18
I've heard that Wellness contains garlic and garlic can be toxic to cats.
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by catpurr
Please don't take this as being mean. I love cats and am on a fixed income myself so I understand the costs involved. The most important thing is to start your kitten out with the best quality food available. There really is no perfect food made by manufacturers of cat food, but why feed lousy food to a kitten who needs all the nutrition it can get for a good start. Always look at the first five ingredients on the label. If any of them are by-products, don't use it. If they are something cats shouldn't have, don't use it. My suggestion would be to feed canned Wellness. If you must feed dry try Propac NOT Proplan. Big difference in quality and not big difference in price. You will pay in the long run with vet bills if you feed poor quality food, plain and simple. Another good canned is Nature's Variety. Both Wellness and Nature's Variety canned are grain-free. Natural balance is sold at regular pet stores and is much better than anything Purina produces. All my best.
Truely Pro pac s cat food has lot s of corn and some digest ... One is about the same ... I also dont due Wellness due to garlic and the one time I did before knowing about garlic no one would touch it ...
I will be trying Natures Varitey as my vet will soon carry it but she warned me the $$$$$ is high ...
post #9 of 18
On their web site, Nature's Variety list garlic as an ingredient. At least for their canned Chicken and Turkey.
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denice
On their web site, Nature's Variety list garlic as an ingredient. At least for their canned Chicken and Turkey.
I thought I had seen it but not in the dry or raw ..:0 thanks for the heads up
post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanx for all the replies and information, but I'm sticking to Purina ONE. Why pay $6.00 for a 3lb bag when the money isn't there to spend like that.
post #12 of 18
IMO you get what you pay for. Sometimes the cheaper foods will wind up costing you more in vet bills over time.

I go with quality - you might pay a bit more, but you use LESS food and therefore its more cost effective over time. We feed Iams dry - my oldest cat is 17 (she lives with a good friend of mine when we moved). Her brother is 15 yrs old - both have been Iams cats from day one and rarely had to go to the vet for anything (other then routine shots).
post #13 of 18
The idea with better quality food is that since it is healthier it fills the cat up faster and keeps them full so they don't keep coming back for more like they do with low quality food. So in the long run, you save a lot of money becasue the cats don't finish the bag as fast. Not only that, but it saves in vet bills too. If you don't feed wet, your cat is more likely to not get the amount of water it needs and can easily get UTI or crystals, with the lower quality foods like Purina, your cat doesn't stay as healthy and you may be spending a ton more in vet bills.

Bottom line is in the long run you will save money by feeding the higher quality more expensive foods. Do you really want to be filling your cats with by-products and digest and corn and fillers? Does that even sound healthy to you? Their coats are going to get dry and dull and dandruffy and they can gain weight. If you feed them the equivilant to McDonalds, they will look like you are feeding them junk

Plus if you get a larger bag of good quality food, you won't have to buy it again for quite awile.
post #14 of 18
Not much time today but wanted to respond a few issues. Wheat is a totally nonfermentable fiber to cats - there's nothing to suggest cats can
process it, and no specific research. Corn has two advantages: Cats get more protein from corn than from any other vegetable per the research. Corn has carotene pigment, and cats need a lot of it - 12 times as much as dogs.

Corn is utilized by cats - and it is a cheap source of protein as they apparently extract protein reasonably from corn and it is missing from many foods or substituted with wheat. Also Propac kitten is preserved entirely by Vit E - which to me seems the only preservative that does not adversely impact on the cat's lack of ability to detoxify (which ends up kidney or other
damage over time) and also very importantly on the cat's
*requirement* for the right intestinal flora.
Chicken digest is not great. It is leftovers of chicken origin
"digested" by adding chemicals to render the result usable as food.
I'd prefer not to have it in there, even quite far down the ingredient
list, but accept it because I can't find a better dry food. Proplan has several protien by-products sources right up top. Also wheat, and SOY a definite NO NO for cats. So they are just jacking up the protien content with the wrong protien and by-products. Soy destroys taurine so that's not catfood. It also lists phosphoric acid. Research shows that Soy products and the usually corresponding phosphoric acid contribute to ill health for kitties.
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by catpurr
Not much time today but wanted to respond a few issues. Wheat is a totally nonfermentable fiber to cats - there's nothing to suggest cats can
process it, and no specific research. Corn has two advantages: Cats get more protein from corn than from any other vegetable per the research. Corn has carotene pigment, and cats need a lot of it - 12 times as much as dogs.

Corn is utilized by cats - and it is a cheap source of protein as they apparently extract protein reasonably from corn and it is missing from many foods or substituted with wheat. Also Propac kitten is preserved entirely by Vit E - which to me seems the only preservative that does not adversely impact on the cat's lack of ability to detoxify (which ends up kidney or other
damage over time) and also very importantly on the cat's
*requirement* for the right intestinal flora.
Chicken digest is not great. It is leftovers of chicken origin
"digested" by adding chemicals to render the result usable as food.
I'd prefer not to have it in there, even quite far down the ingredient
list, but accept it because I can't find a better dry food. Proplan has several protien by-products sources right up top. Also wheat, and SOY a definite NO NO for cats. So they are just jacking up the protien content with the wrong protien and by-products. Soy destroys taurine so that's not catfood. It also lists phosphoric acid. Research shows that Soy products and the usually corresponding phosphoric acid contribute to ill health for kitties.

I would suspect you need to research a bit more ... Corn is not digestable to a cat at more than 30-50% by contrast rice is 70-80% digestable , wheat is 50-70% ... Corn is at time used in protein only form( corn gluten meal) which is about 60% digestable ...Cats are carnivores and can live3 on less than 3-5% veggie matter and 0% grain ... IF Pro pac is the best you can do you are doing okay as it is better than many "premium " but it is far from true premium
post #16 of 18
I do not consider Purina One a low quality food so I think you are doing fine feeding it to your kitten. Purina One in my opinion is a medium quality food. There are many foods that cost double what Purina One cost and they are in the same range as quality. The one brand that I do feel is better is Innova.
post #17 of 18
Purina One kitten food actually is very similar to a lot of premium adult cat foods.

I feed it to my adult cats when I am really short on cash.
post #18 of 18
My post was simply a comparison between Propac and Proplan, since this person seemed to want to feed a dry food. I personally don't like dry food as by it's nature is carbo loaded, and cats are obligate carnivores who don't do well on that type food. They need meat protiens, not veggies, not carbos. I personally don't like corn, or forms of it, either. Wheat is a cat allergen, also no good. To conclude my responses, people have to read labels and any food that has a meat by-products, especially in the first 5 ingredients, should see a red flag. IMHO there is no premium dry food, it's just a contradiction in terms. But if someone insists on feeding it, at least try to avoid the additives that are allergens or worse, harmful; and try to get one without by-products.
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