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wellness dry kitten and merrick kitten food

post #1 of 31
Thread Starter 
woulld they be considered high quality.? or of a higher quality than Nutro kitten or eukanuba kitten wet aand dry/
post #2 of 31
I personally consider both(wellness and merrick) high quality food.
post #3 of 31
I give Stoli wellness dry and wellness wet - he LOVES it
post #4 of 31
They are both great foods. I tried to feed Wellness to my kitten but he wouldn't eat it
post #5 of 31
Both are truely premium foods ... I use Merrick on occation
post #6 of 31
Yes, they are both high quality foods. Especially Merrick canned. It looks like real food and has great ingredients. My fosters get Merrick and love it. I have never tried Wellness before, but they ingredients are good! I definately think they are of WAY better quality than Eukanuba and Nutro.
post #7 of 31
Garlic causes cats' red blood cells to shrivel, causing hypolytic anemia, which can cause death. Wellness contains garlic. I don't understand what a "safe" level of garlic would be, if someone could explain this to me, and why it isn't bad to have something poisonous to cats in a cat food.
post #8 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zissou'sMom
Garlic causes cats' red blood cells to shrivel, causing hypolytic anemia, which can cause death. Wellness contains garlic. I don't understand what a "safe" level of garlic would be, if someone could explain this to me, and why it isn't bad to have something poisonous to cats in a cat food.
I would love someone to explain that to me....
post #9 of 31
I've found a really good article on onions/shallots/garlic in animals that also mentions cats: http://www.nssvet.org/student/refere...ettech_424.pdf
Note that it is a PDF before clicking the link.

Basically, .5% of the body weight in onions needs to be ingested for toxicity in apparently both cats and dogs, cats with diabetes, hyperthyroidism, or lymphoma can easily die from that much. So, a 10-lb cat would need to eat .05 lbs of onion, or 23 ounces. That is, I guess, a lot, but I'm not feeding my cat anything with onion or garlic in it, since that's a one-shot number and not a daily feeding number. It would be like feeding a cat food with a little bit of theobromine (poison in chocolate) in it. The article is specifically about onions, I guess, but says garlic is related and has a similar chemical make-up, and everything else I can find says that garlic has the same effects.

Please, anyone explain how this is safe in cat food?
post #10 of 31
I thought someone already posted that it is a typo on the wellness cans.
post #11 of 31
I've read that garlic is supposed to healthful in small amounts. To help fight of fleas and such. It's only harmful in large amounts. I, personally, see nothing wrong with a bit of garlic in cat food. It wouldn't stop me from feeding it or recommending it. Infact, MANY cat foods contain garlic. Wellness isn't the only one. Natural Balance, Solid Gold, Evolve, Wysong, to name a few, also contain garlic. But I haven't seen any complaints or problems with these foods. I think there would be alot of dead cats if such a small amount of garlic was harmful. That's my two cents.
post #12 of 31
If it is a typo, it's on their website too. I think that was for the wet food anyway, this is the dry. http://www.oldmotherhubbard.com/cats...yCatSup5Kitten
is what I was looking at. It's also listed on the website ingredients for dry. If it was just old labels that got sent out from years ago, why wouldn't they change their website too? (it's copyrighted 05)
post #13 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zissou'sMom
If it is a typo, it's on their website too. I think that was for the wet food anyway, this is the dry. http://www.oldmotherhubbard.com/cats...yCatSup5Kitten
is what I was looking at. It's also listed on the website ingredients for dry. If it was just old labels that got sent out from years ago, why wouldn't they change their website too? (it's copyrighted 05)
i'll see if i can find the thread that it's posted in - It was just recently.
post #14 of 31
Hi,
My name is Nicole and I work for Wellness and Old Mother Hubbard in Consumer Affairs. I would like to address your concerns with garlic in the cat foods.

Garlic has been long used for its healthful benefits as well as a flavorful ingredient in recipes around the world. Cats won't eat what they can't smell. At Wellness we add only a trace amount of garlic to our cat food to increase palatability and aroma. While it is a member of the onion family, garlic contains an extremely low concentration of the compound found in onions that is harmful to cats. As with most things, the old saying "moderation in all things" applies to garlic. It would require a massive amount of garlic to cause a cat to become ill. Some studies even show that small amounts of garlic can actually be beneficial to the health of pets.


I do hope this helps. If you have any questions about Wellness Cat food please feel free to email me!

Nicole
Consumer Affairs
Wellness & Old Mother Hubbard
post #15 of 31
Both of my cats are very picky about wet food and Wellness Chicken or Turkey and Meow Mix wet are the only ones my cats will consistently eat. I don't want to give them the Meow Mix wet daily because of the high fish content so they get mostly Wellness. At one time we thought one of my cats might have IBD and I was following a forum about IBD cats. As far as commercial food goes Wellness chicken was by far the best tolerated by these cats. For some cats, it was the only commercial food they could eat.
post #16 of 31
Natural Balance does not contain garlic.

I occasionally feed my cats the Wellness Chicken and Lobster and they love it. It's true that there are a number of premium foods on the market that contain a bit of garlic, Foster and Smith canned food for example has ingredients very similar to Wellness, chicken, chicken liver, sweet potatoes, cranberries.... including a bit of garlic. This company could not stay in business if the small amount of garlic in their food was hurting cats and they are a pretty big company with a 24 hour customer service hotline, I get catalogs from them all the time and Foster and Smith are pretty well respected veterinarians. I really think these products such as Wellness, Foster and Smith, Solid Gold, Prairie which all contain a bit of garlic could not be put on the market if they weren't secure about the safety of these foods. If any animals were getting sick from this, it would be in the news, companies could be sued, and there would be a major uproar, it would be like the issue of what happened with Diamond Pet Foods and micotoxins. I think this issue is very controversial. In Dr Pitcairn's Guide to Natural Health for dogs and cats he approves of a small amount of garlic for intestinal health. Holistic vets use garlic for certain reasons, other vets are against it. I personally would not add it extra to my cat's food but I'm not going to worry if a can of something I occasionally feed my cats has a small amount of garlic in it. I never heard, read or seen any reports of cats getting sick from it.

Onion powder or onions, I would never trust and I was surprised to find out that some generic cat foods at my local grocery store, I think it's called Safeway Select, I could be wrong about name, I have to check on that, but this food has onion powder in it. I wouldn't feed that to my cats if you paid me.
post #17 of 31
Solid Gold and Natural Balence both removed garlic due to consumer demand ( that is what the reps told me)... Natural balence also removed the onion powder from it dog food
post #18 of 31
Natura also removed garlic from its food due to consumer demand. I think if Wellness did the same it would make a lot of consumers feel a whole lot more comfortable. Wellness would just have to find another way to make its food palatable to pets. I'm sure it can be done if other companies have done it.

To the Wellness rep: This is a suggestion.
post #19 of 31
Gizmo's worst reaction (rejection) was to Paul Newman's Own and Wellness and Felidae. The first two contain garlic.

California Natural and Nature's Logic (her current brand, rabbit meat and so on) do not contain garlic. The cat switched brands with ease.

I agree that garlic does not belong in cat food--at least not THIS cat's food.
post #20 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ping View Post
I personally consider both(wellness and merrick) high quality food.
Have you ever tried Trader Joe's canned cat food? From what I could tell it seems like a pretty good quality food and the cost is only 49 cents for a 5.5 oz. can.
post #21 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zissou'sMom View Post
If it is a typo, it's on their website too. I think that was for the wet food anyway, this is the dry. http://www.oldmotherhubbard.com/cats...yCatSup5Kitten
is what I was looking at. It's also listed on the website ingredients for dry. If it was just old labels that got sent out from years ago, why wouldn't they change their website too? (it's copyrighted 05)
If anyone knows the story about garlic, then please post. I just started feeding my kittens wellness canned along with nutro max cat can canned. I now understand that max cat has a bad preservative in it and that garlic is in wellness. I don't want to spend over $1 for a 3 oz. can but I do want to feed my kittens a good quality food. Currently, they are eating Felidae dry and they really seem to like it. But I am trying desperately to find a good quality canned cat food as I plan on feeding them more wet than dry. I recently purchased Trader Joe's canned and they seem to like it. Has anyone tried it before. It is only 49 cents for a 5.5 oz. can and the first 5 ingredients seem to be good. Turkey broth, turkey, poultry giblets, ocean fish, and chicken. What do you think?
post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbfromwp View Post
If anyone knows the story about garlic, then please post. I just started feeding my kittens wellness canned along with nutro max cat can canned. I now understand that max cat has a bad preservative in it and that garlic is in wellness. I don't want to spend over $1 for a 3 oz. can but I do want to feed my kittens a good quality food. Currently, they are eating Felidae dry and they really seem to like it. But I am trying desperately to find a good quality canned cat food as I plan on feeding them more wet than dry. I recently purchased Trader Joe's canned and they seem to like it. Has anyone tried it before. It is only 49 cents for a 5.5 oz. can and the first 5 ingredients seem to be good. Turkey broth, turkey, poultry giblets, ocean fish, and chicken. What do you think?
MAX cat contains only natural preservatives ... The dry once upon a time over 10 yrs ago had ethoxiquin.... Felidea is good as is Nutro and I would love to have trader joes ///
post #23 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Welcat View Post
Hi,

Cats won't eat what they can't smell.

Nicole
Consumer Affairs
Wellness & Old Mother Hubbard
I will not ever under any circumstances feed my cats anything with even a trace amount of garlic.

I have tried them on many different brands that don't contain garlic, and have had them eat it just fine. Some of them smelled quite strong, and others I barely noticed.

If it weren't for the garlic issue, I would probably be buying Wellness probably, since I like the look of it otherwise.

The manufacturers of Wellness and other pet foods that contain garlic need to know that it really is a serious issue with many cat owners. More of us are becoming educated enough to read the inigredient lists, and, with so many choices available, refuse to settle for something that might be harmful to our pets.
post #24 of 31
Garlic can be used in medicinal amounts( my holostic vets differ , one says yes in ver very very low amounts ie homeopathy and the other says NO NO NO to any)... I have learned BUT it is like garlic oil so it is a very very minute amount ( like homeopathy)... If you use garlic USE IT ONLY under the SUPERVISION of a VET
post #25 of 31
Back to the original question, I love Merrick foods (and so do our babies). It looks good enough for me to eat. The bad part is I find it very expensive here in Canada. The good part is I can afford to buy it and do. There was a back order on the Thanksgiving Day Dinner last week so I had to go to a different store to get the smaller cans. Because of this, I bought a couple of different flavours to try once again and see if they will eat them. They did!
post #26 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Welcat View Post
Hi,
My name is Nicole and I work for Wellness and Old Mother Hubbard in Consumer Affairs. I would like to address your concerns with garlic in the cat foods.

Garlic has been long used for its healthful benefits as well as a flavorful ingredient in recipes around the world. Cats won't eat what they can't smell. At Wellness we add only a trace amount of garlic to our cat food to increase palatability and aroma. While it is a member of the onion family, garlic contains an extremely low concentration of the compound found in onions that is harmful to cats. As with most things, the old saying "moderation in all things" applies to garlic. It would require a massive amount of garlic to cause a cat to become ill. Some studies even show that small amounts of garlic can actually be beneficial to the health of pets.


I do hope this helps. If you have any questions about Wellness Cat food please feel free to email me!

Nicole
Consumer Affairs
Wellness & Old Mother Hubbard

For a representative of this company, your language is extremely vague. That is a bit of a turn off to say the least. Can you be more specific and not use words like "trace amount" and "extremely low" and "massive amount"? Those words are absolutely meaningless. Even with trace amounts, that can build up over years. I'm sure a cat that eats "trace amounts" of garlic every day will have a "massive amount" more in their system than a cat that consumed an "extremely low" amount of garlic over their lifetimes.

Yes, I'm being a little snyde here. But I take my cats health VERY seriously and I would appreciate a little genuine (that means unbiased towards your product) feedback from you. Thank you.

For anyone who's interested, I put together a chart of ingredients. I researched the ingredients independantly (from several sources) and recorded them, but the pro's and con's are way to big to fit here. But to make it easier, I highlighted the questionable ingredients. Not all that are highlighted are bad, but they should be looked into (I also didn't repeat highlighting much, so if its highligted once, its the same for other columns). I highly recommend that everyone take a look at these ingredients and do some research. I've decided to go with Innova Evo (I also give raw food 'treats' like gizzards, liver and chicken hearts).

This table is for dry food only. I'm still working on a table for canned foods:

post #27 of 31
Can you please tell me why ground brown rice and whole oats are questionable? I've always been told that those ingredients were fine for a cat, in fact that they were much better than corn, white rice, rice bran, wheat, etc...
What grains would you recommend (in a pet food that contains grains...)?
post #28 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nekochan View Post
Can you please tell me why ground brown rice and whole oats are questionable? I've always been told that those ingredients were fine for a cat, in fact that they were much better than corn, white rice, rice bran, wheat, etc...
What grains would you recommend (in a pet food that contains grains...)?
Just questionable, not necessarily bad. Cats are naturally carnivores, so anything thats not meat related I questioned. BUT, cats also naturally chew on certain grasses and grains, so I'm not saying that they're all bad. I just wanted an explanation for why the different companies felt that they would be beneficial and why they added them to their products. It seemed to me that more often than not those grains were being added as a filler, and the nutritional value was added as an afterthought or as a marketing tool to appeal more to human diets than cat diets.

That said, I'm no expert and I've only just switched my cat from Purina Naturals to Innova Evo. Only time will tell if it was truely a good choice or if it made no significant difference. So I wouldn't recommend anything other than researching for yourself and tailoring your cats diet to their specific needs.

For example, I have a siamese and a bengal on the way. Both breeds are known to have sensitive tummies. For that reason alone, I avoid anything with corn or a bunch of fillers. I would like to put them on a raw diet, but I'm still not sure thats totally necessary. I'm still learning and I was taught to question everything.

For the record, I'm a bit obsessive about some things and this happened to be one of them.
post #29 of 31
Tiffanyjbt,

I am sorry if the language was vague. I will try to clarify further by paraphrasing an article from Petfood Industry magazine (Nov 2006). The name of the article is Onions and garlic offer flavor in the right amounts and it is written by Greg Aldrich, PhD. He is the president of Pet Food & Ingredient Technology Inc., which facilitates innovations in foods and ingredients for companion animals.

The article says

“Fewer reports exist on the ill effects of garlic or its “toxic” dose. But of the few, one noted that garlic (boiled, dehydrated) at a dose equivalent to 5 g/kg body weight led to the appearance of damaged red blood cells, but did not develop into hemolytic anemia (Lee et al, 2000). Unlike onions, form may significantly affect these results as aged garlic extract supposedly acts more like an antioxidant in opposition to raw or boiled garlic, which may stimulate oxidation.(Amagasse et al., 2001). Aged garlic extract was also reported to be milder to (the) canine stomach mucosa than boiled dehydrated or raw garlic (Hoshino, et al.,2001), which has been noted to lead to ulcers.”

The article goes on to say that there is not enough evidence to support the idea that garlic is toxic. It does state that onions are a problem for cats, but data about garlic is missing.

I tried locating the article online, but was unable to find it.

At Wellness out canned foods have a garlic inclusion rate of .01%-.05% in the canned foods. This is much lower than the value that Dr. Aldrich states as harmful. 5 g/kg of body weight translates to 23 grams of garlic for a 10 lb. cat (100 grams of garlic needed to harm a 45 lb. dog). An average serving of our cat food provides approximately 0.078g of garlic (the amount in a 5.5 oz. can). I hope this helps you. If you’d like more specifics or would like me to try and obtain that article from the author, just let me know.

Nicole
Consumer Affairs Wellness/Old Mother Hubbard
post #30 of 31
Thank you for your response Nicole. It seems like there is a scare about garlic due to its association with onions that may be totally unwarranted. I'll keep an eye out more more data regarding the pro's and con's of garlic in relation to feline diet/health. Right now, it seems like the jury is still out. Any other information you can add would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
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