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Rudeness: The New Norm? - Page 2

post #31 of 43
Aww that is sweet. Yes, manners are a must for me. I'm not perfect by no means but I am an adult and I still respect my 'elders' and others around me. I say Yes ma'am, No sir, thank you, pls. etc. Holly says all this and excuse me and more. I think its a must to teach your children before the age of 5.
post #32 of 43
What really bothers are people who don't say "thankyou, yes sir, yes mam, please, no thankyou, stuff like that....you know- the children who say "yea" or "what" to their parents ....it irratates me!!!! I have 8 nieces and nephews 2 great nieces, and i teach children full time- I have taught ALL of them about manners and the importance of thankyous and pleases...as well as the proper greetings and the proper way to address adults. I just think a lot of time people forget how important it is to teach children about manners. Manners will accomplish a lot and will show others what kind of person you are. As well as patience. I think that manners as well as politeness are learned things that need to be taught to children (and some adults!!!). I honestly think that people will be taken more seriously, and will learn respect for their elders and as well as others by using proper manners. I may be a southern belle, but i'm proud of my manners and the fact that i don't disrespect people in that sense. Hijack Over
post #33 of 43
There are still a FEW polite people left in the world. This morning, I went out to breakfast, with my parents. Since Pops was carrying my 5-month-old nephew, I was pushing Mom's wheelchair. A young man at the cash register left his change lying on the counter and jumped to open the door for Mom and me. He also held the door for Pops.
post #34 of 43
Today, most people only care about being heard rather than listening, being right and getting their way rather than compromising.

People today are even willing subject children in other countries to cheap labour to save a penny. (one major store name, which I cannot type out do to liability..but it's in this thread )

It's not just people, but business places too. Like they know people survive on what they make but still only give them 2 something an hour without bennifits and the governments don't do anything to help those businesses afford to pay their employees a decent wage. It's just a sad world and no one seems to care.

Hardly any one cares about anyone anywhere but themselves these days and it's pretty sickening to me.
post #35 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phenomsmom
I agree! IMO everyone tries to come up with a medical reason for everything. Not saying that there isn't a rise in autism, but a medical diagnosis for everything isn't the answer.
Aaaamen! Everyone wants to label their kid or themselves with some disease and hop on some meds for it...ugh! The same behaviors those kids have are the ones we and those around us have growing up...it's called being a kid! I understand some people *do* have medical problems...but too many people are not claiming them as the easy way out rather than dealing with the problem right.
post #36 of 43
Yes, people can be quite rude. Y'all should take a trip to NYC and you will really see what rudeness is let me tell ya it will really test your patience. You pretty much learn just to ignore it after a while. As much as you would like to change people, I doubt that will happen. I think I gave up on trying a long time ago.
post #37 of 43
I have just read the perfect book for all you frustrated people out there.

It's by Lynne Truss and it's called 'Talk to the hand - or the Utter Bloody Rudeness of Everyday Life', subtitled Six good reasons to stay at home and lock the door.

You are not alone! Other people hate it all too. I think that most people just can't be bothered with manners, they are too lazy and think it doesn't matter.
post #38 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by lisalee
Y'all should take a trip to NYC and you will really see what rudeness is
As a born and bred New Yorker, I must, with utmost politeness and gentility, disagree. Yes indeed we do have rude people here, I will not deny that. But as a person who was taught as a child to treat people with respect and consideration, I do take some offense at the notion that we are a city of total boorishness. Like I said, we definitely have a number of rude people here (e.g., not saying "thank you" when someone holds the door, standing right in front of the subway doors so you can't get in or out, playing their car radios so loud I can hear it in my 6th floor apartment). But those people annoy me just as much as they annoy you, and I know I am not alone. I will have to say that we are perhaps not as open and friendly as people from other parts of the country, at least as we go about our daily lives, but that comes from living in a fast-paced, crowded environment. It is difficult to maintain one's personal space living here, so maybe we tend not to be as warm towards strangers as people living elsewhere are, and that brusqueness is sometimes, I think, mistaken for rudeness. But I don't think it's fair to generalize and say this a rude city.
post #39 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamacat
As a born and bred New Yorker, I must, with utmost politeness and gentility, disagree. Yes indeed we do have rude people here, I will not deny that. But as a person who was taught as a child to treat people with respect and consideration, I do take some offense at the notion that we are a city of total boorishness. Like I said, we definitely have a number of rude people here (e.g., not saying "thank you" when someone holds the door, standing right in front of the subway doors so you can't get in or out, playing their car radios so loud I can hear it in my 6th floor apartment). But those people annoy me just as much as they annoy you, and I know I am not alone. I will have to say that we are perhaps not as open and friendly as people from other parts of the country, at least as we go about our daily lives, but that comes from living in a fast-paced, crowded environment. It is difficult to maintain one's personal space living here, so maybe we tend not to be as warm towards strangers as people living elsewhere are, and that brusqueness is sometimes, I think, mistaken for rudeness. But I don't think it's fair to generalize and say this a rude city.
I'm sorry you took offense to my comment, it was not meant to be taken that way. I should of been more specific, I meant Manhatten not Queens, NY which I see is where you are from. I have never been to Queens and have no experience there, but I'm sure it's a very beautiful city and I'm sure it's a much slower pace there. I have been going into Manhatten though for over twenty years now and this is the impression I get, don't get me wrong, heck I love NYC! I know many New Yorkers that would agree with me about the rudeness factor, my statement was not meant to put anyone down, you are very correct there are rude people everywhere.... I just find it more so when I go into Manhatten. But it's a beautiful city with many kind and decent people too and I love it there.
post #40 of 43
I agree with the story about Wal-Mart and most other stores too.

Why don't people pull the cart over to the side so you aren't just standing there in the middle of the aisle like "I am the only person in this store right now!"
I went the Wallyworld today and it was one after another. Just trying to get down an aisle was a task.
I pull my cart as close as I can to the side and look for what I am wanting. I try to look behind me once in a while (which obviously some never do) and try not to block someone in. I look at it like this; I don't want someone pressuring me to move, so I stay out of the gen. public pathway.
WHY do people not get this?
And the checkout lane! Omg, if one more person comes right up next to me as I am paying they are gonna get the back of my hand wherever it lands.
If they aren't running over your heels they do not allow you any space to finish your business. But if someone did that to them.........

I hear a LOT of people talking about this rudeness that we all deal with everyday, but I don't think people stop to think or look at themselves and how they contribute to it. A 2-4 ft. space between you and the person in front of you maybe would be polite. You aren't gonna get out of there any quicker by staying right on someone.

Sorry for the rant, but it hit a nerve with the shopping trip I had earlier today.
post #41 of 43
^ Man, you just described every trip to the store I've had lately! I agree with all your rants, too.
post #42 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by pjk5900
Why don't people pull the cart over to the side so you aren't just standing there in the middle of the aisle like "I am the only person in this store right now!"
You know what I do with those people? I keep pushing my cart right into theirs and plow through it!

I do get dirty looks and sometimes apologies, and then I say "Oh I'm sorry...I didn't realise there were other people in this store either!"
post #43 of 43
Talk about invasion of space. I take the subway to work and you would not believe what goes on there. For example this morning I got on and luckly found a seat. Who I felt sorry for were the people across from me where this two ton woman tried to squeez herself into a seat made for one normal size person. She could not care less that there was not way she would fit and squash the people to the left and right of her like sardines. Nooo - she did not give a rats ass - she scooted and wiggled until she happily managed to get her butt half way into that seat.

Absolutely amazing - no consideration at all....
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