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Uhhh.... job question!!

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I'm applying for a few jobs here in town (along with the insurance one )

But on this advertisement I found, it says to include salary requirements in my cover letter.

How do I go along stating how much I'd like to make? I don't want to put too low, cuz then I'd possibly get stuck at that much, but then I don't want to say too high, cuz I don't want to get turned down for that factor.

Do I just say something like.... ' I'm open to discussing my salary requirements with you in person?'

I don't know how to go about this!

Any help?!
post #2 of 15
Ask people who are in similar fields how much they get paid.
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
I don't have that much time

I'm just not that sure I should put down a salary?? Is that really proper!? I'd rather do that in person....
post #4 of 15
Yeah you should probably do that in person...and on the cover letter you can just state what you had said. It's always better to discuss things in person

Or you could just say a salary range.....for example:


"My salary requirement is in the $xx to $xx range, based on the job responsibilities and total compensation package."
post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thats what I thought too.....

I don't want to ask for too much, or too little, you know!? I'd like to make good money, but I'd so much rather speak to them in person.
post #6 of 15
I think it may be a trick question in many respects. You could use the amunition they provided you, (the word "requirements") and say that you require a personal meeting to negotiate your salary, or something to that effect.
post #7 of 15
Perhaps you could say "I am currently making approximately $??? (bump up your actual salary by a few thousand a year), but I am excited about any new opportunity."

This way, you've actually given a number (probably smart, since they specifically asked you to provide salary requirements), they know your not going to tranfer to a lower paying job, and you've given yourself a raise even if they just match it. They cannot ask your current employer salary questions, so you're clear there.
post #8 of 15
Check www.salarywizard.com for ideas.
But if you have a good idea of what you want, go with a range...one that's slightly below and one thats a little higher...typically the place that hires you will pick a salary in the middle.
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by babyharley
I'm applying for a few jobs here in town (along with the insurance one )

But on this advertisement I found, it says to include salary requirements in my cover letter.

How do I go along stating how much I'd like to make? I don't want to put too low, cuz then I'd possibly get stuck at that much, but then I don't want to say too high, cuz I don't want to get turned down for that factor.

Do I just say something like.... ' I'm open to discussing my salary requirements with you in person?'

I don't know how to go about this!

Any help?!

Hi,
Here are some of my thoughts ....

If you omit the information, then, they think you can't follow directions, or maybe you're just trying to be "slick".

And, as you said, if you "require" too much, the letter might get tossed.

You could give them a salary range, then add that the salary is "negotiable". I'd try to put the salary info in the middle of the cover letter or where ever it wouldn't stand out so much. :-)

==(Professionally speaking, if an applicant couldn't follow my requests, I tossed. If I requested a salary figure requirement be included, it helped me to know if I could afford them.

If the resume was a good fit for us, but higher $$ than I wanted to pay, I'd probably make a call just to confirm the applicant's needs. ==

Consider: If the job is only willing to pay ? say ? minimum wage?, and your "requirements" are more than they are willing to pay -- then they'd do you a FAVOR by tossing your resumé -- because you need a LIVING wage.

If the salary requirement you request is "too little" (your standards), - then, depending on your qualifications, they might be more interested in interviewing you, at which time you'll probably talk about the pay.

BUT these discussions won't take place unless you get that interview.

Then, WHEN you do get the interview, and they talk to you about the salary, you'll know if you'll be able to "live" with the amount --- you don't have to "get stuck", you STILL have a choice, you can negotiate, and if they can't meet YOUR standards, you can tell them "no thanks".

Hope this helps a little,
Gloria
post #10 of 15
I always put "negotiable"... leaves it open for discussion. The employer will usually tell you before you ask when you put "negotiable" and if it's not something you want then you can just say no thanks. A job is going to pay you what they want to anyways
post #11 of 15
Part of my severance pkg was 3 month with Right Mgmt. I looked in their manual they gave use. It states that the salary requirements are an attempt to screen you in or out. It also provides a starting point for the employer to base an offer w/o respect to what the employer might have been willing to pay.
They advise to leave the salary info blank. If it specifies write in Flexible.
If you know the salary range state your requirements as a range with the top of the employers range being your midpoint range.
If you have a 1st interview and the HR person asks mention that you would like to know more about the position and responsibilities before discussing salary. Bring up you would like to know more about the company 1st.
If you want more tips -this manual I have has lots of them!!!
post #12 of 15
You know, Mackenzie, Joni taught us this. I just can't remember what she said! I do know you do not want to put a figure in. Put 'flexible' or 'up for discussion'.
post #13 of 15
My question though is, if you have a certain salary you want to make...say $30K per year...if they aren't going to even offer that as a salary, why would you want to work there?

A company that wants you to work for them will find the money to pay you what you want in order for them to get you to work. If you are qualified, personable, etc, then they'll definitely bring you in for negotiations.
post #14 of 15
I would say put down a few thousand more than you currently make.

Then no matter what, if they are interested you will at least get more than you currently make. And if the starting salary there is more, they would probably give you more. I can't see them about to offer you say $40000 but you say you'd like $27000, and then they say okay well heres $28000. I'm pretty sure most companies have a starting salary they go by, and they won't undercut you.

Good Luck!
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by lunasmom
My question though is, if you have a certain salary you want to make...say $30K per year...if they aren't going to even offer that as a salary, why would you want to work there?
A company that wants you to work for them will find the money to pay you what you want in order for them to get you to work. If you are qualified, personable, etc, then they'll definitely bring you in for negotiations.
Exactly! DITTO!
Honesty - as the saying goes, is the best policy.

As a person with experience in doing the hiring - if the applicant complied with my request, I respected that.

If I requested a salary "requirement", I really wanted to know if I could "afford" that person, I wasn't "playing games". If a qualified, desirable applicant had too high of a salary requirement, I'd definitely call and talk with them. But, then - maybe that was just me? People are/were more important to me than "the job".
Gloria
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