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Holding kittens for new family....

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I have a litter of 7 kittens. 3 of them are black females and I can't tell them apart. I have a family coming over to choose their two kittens tonight. (They are still not ready to leave momcat yet) How can I "mark" a kitten if the family wants a specific black female?
post #2 of 18
What age are the kittens? If they are around 6-7 weeks old, you could use a small break away collar. If they are younger, and haven't had their first vaccinations, I would recommend waiting for others to be around them until the first set of vaccinations.
Also, if they are younger, and to tell them apart for weighing reasons, you can try nail polish under the arm, (the Momma may still get to it and clean it off though.)
I am sure others will have suggestions, I use Sharpie markers, but they wouldn't show up on an all black kitten.
I would recommend keeping them with Mom until 11-12 weeks of age, after 2-3 sets of vaccinations and spay or neuter, before homing.
Good luck finding purr-fect furever homes.
post #3 of 18
Clip out a tiny bit of hair on one specific area?
post #4 of 18
Fingernail polish on claws on different feet. (Kitten A has right front, Kitten B has left front, etc.) Or softpaws only on one foot.
post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the tips.

By the way, I'm not a breeder-I took in a stray who delievered 7 kittens two days later.

I am not even sure if I'm going to let this family have the 2 kittens. How do you all feel about families with a very active 3 year old? I know these parents love animals (no experience with cats tho) and the older boy was pretty good with the kittens, but they cant be watching that child all the time. And I have a hard time trusting the kittens will stay indoors. They have a dog and 2 young boys who probably run in and out.

What kinds of questions do you ask potential families? Do you base your decisions on "instinct"? How do you deal with letting go?
post #6 of 18
I used to use nail polish, just one toe nail.
post #7 of 18
I'd try a small collar or string/yarn. It would be hard to paint tiny nails tho, but that's a possibility. Good luck. Are you sure there are no identifying marks - maybe some shading differences? There is no white on them at all?
post #8 of 18
You know the paper collars that vets use? You can by them out of cat catelogs or of the web.
post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenKitty45
I'd try a small collar or string/yarn. It would be hard to paint tiny nails tho, but that's a possibility. Good luck. Are you sure there are no identifying marks - maybe some shading differences? There is no white on them at all?
We did find a distinquishing mark on the one they want. She has a white patch in the shape of a V on her belly. I just still don't know if I'm even going to give them to the family. I have some reservations.
post #10 of 18
I had a very active 3 yo and got a kitten. It was not a good mix! I was constantly telling my son to leave the kitty alone. Fortunately, Oliver was a tough little guy, but whew! it was a job trying to make sure my son didn't love him into an injury. Good rule of thumb is don't adopt kittens under 5-6 months of age to kids under the age of 5 yo. There are exceptions and little girls might be much more gentle. But my little guy was rough and tumble. I would suggest to the family that they go to the local shelter and get 2 older kittens or even 1 yo. Just my 2 cents.
post #11 of 18
we have had cats/kittens since my kids were born a 3 year old is not to young to teach him to be nice to kitty and teach how to hold or even teach he can only pet it not pick it up.
post #12 of 18
you cant use different color permanant markers to make a dot on the inside of the ears of each one. It will comes off eventually but it takes taime.
post #13 of 18
I personally grew up with two cats and two dogs ... I see no issue with an active three yr old provided the parents are parenting... One of the cats was11 when I came along and he let me pet him and took off when he was finished
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharky
I personally grew up with two cats and two dogs ... I see no issue with an active three yr old provided the parents are parenting... One of the cats was11 when I came along and he let me pet him and took off when he was finished
My parents gave away my kitten because of my little sister.
She kept eating from the cat's bowl, and wouldn't leave the cat alone.
It could be a problem.
post #15 of 18
I have had pets with kids for 23 years. I understand the concern about a young child with a kitten. In fact, my rescue does not adopt to families with children under age 5. But I started fostering when my son was 4!

If you ever watch a child with a cat they grew up with, you will know that life as a child's pet is very sweet. Of course, the parents need to take the time to teach the child how to treat the animal.

My dd was complaining once that she didn't get enough sleep, because one of our foster kitties was waking her up in the middle of the night, and somehow compelling her to stay awake for hours, petting the kitty! Any adult would have gone back to sleep. But my dd woke up several nights in a row to pet Jackie. I did offer to shut the kitties out of her room, but she insisted she cannot sleep without Garfield.

I think so long as the parents seem willing to teach the kids, adopting to a family with children is a great idea!
post #16 of 18
but I wanted to add that I DID parent my child and I was closely surpervising. But having a VERY strong willed child, it was a problem. My child was punished for any mistreatment of the cat or inappropriate behavior. Most rescues will not adopt a small kitten to a family with children under 5 yo. for a reason. My son wasn't mean, he just loved the kitten a bit too much. He was also jealous of the kitten because it got a lot of my attention. He had just turned 3 yo. Now my older son, it would not have been a problem at all, even at a very young age as he was and is very cautious and gentle.

I think it really depends on the age of the child and how much supervision the parent is able/willing to give.
post #17 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the input. I decided to "pass" on that family. Those two particular kittens have more suitable home lined up. I still have 3 out of the litter to place.
post #18 of 18
welli have 2 girls aged 5 and 6 and they have been brought up with cats and a jack russell bitch who is now 81/2 and the girls have been ok with all the animals in my house and there has never been a problem
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