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oily fur

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
My mother cat that I have just got over the diarrea (sp) a few weeks ago. and now her fur is really oily looking since then. Is there a way to get rid of the oiliness (sorry i know thats probably not a word lol) off her fur?
post #2 of 12
First, you probably need to take her back to the vet to be sure that the diarrhea hasn't affected her in other ways, like dehydrating her. In the meantime, brushing her may help some.
post #3 of 12
There is also powder "shampoo" on the market that once applied and then brushed will absorbe the oil - good alternative to bathing. Might also be due to hormonal changes - but I would check that with your VET.
post #4 of 12
Oily coats are sometimes an indicator of diabetes and hyperthyroidism, both which can occur after pregnancy. Oily coats can also be an indicator of a poor diet. I would certainly request a blood panel be done to ensure nothing else is going on.
post #5 of 12
Oily coats are also common as an animal detoxes - if you are feeding her a really good quality food, she is likely detoxing and it will level out.
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Murfins
Oily coats are also common as an animal detoxes - if you are feeding her a really good quality food, she is likely detoxing and it will level out.
This could be but a VET visit is in order to make sure it is not a serious issue... Plus most detoxing in mammels should not be seen
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharky
This could be but a VET visit is in order to make sure it is not a serious issue... Plus most detoxing in mammels should not be seen

True enough, if you notice I said it also common.

I have to disagree, detoxing in mammels is almost always seen whether in production of oil, body odor, more frequent urination, etc.
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Murfins
True enough, if you notice I said it could also be.

I have to disagree, detoxing in mammels is almost always seen whether in production of oil, body odor, more frequent urination, etc.
I have done quite a bit of research in the detox area and some signs can be present but unless there is a underlying issue detox is not supposed to have noteable signs ...
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharky
I have done quite a bit of research in the detox area and some signs can be present but unless there is a underlying issue detox is not supposed to have noteable signs ...
A "healing crisis" often occurs if the toxins being discharged into the bloodstream are plentiful enough.
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cearbhaill
A "healing crisis" often occurs if the toxins being discharged into the bloodstream are plentiful enough.
It can happen but most of the studies will dispell that article... I used to think like that article and then I did further research and found it shouldnt happen quite like that...
post #11 of 12
We've gone horribly off topic, and I do apologize to lilboardingurl6.

But having prticipated in a number of fasting regimens I can tell you from personal experience that it very often "gets better before it gets worse".
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cearbhaill
We've gone horribly off topic, and I do apologize to lilboardingurl6.

But having prticipated in a number of fasting regimens I can tell you from personal experience that it very often "gets better before it gets worse".
I too apologize as we have hijacked your thread... please make sure kitty see a vet and tell us how it goes////

I suppose it can get worse before better but I am careful to do one system at a time and I feel beeter not worse only when I did more than one system did it go the other way ... Also when my dog went raw I was told ohh she ll smell ohh shell have bad breath ... umm she smelled BETTER
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