TheCatSite.com › Forums › Our Feline Companions › Cat Nutrition › Unexpected advice from the vet: feed dry
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Unexpected advice from the vet: feed dry - Page 2

post #31 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbantigers
I pretty much agree with that (my cats used to be fed mostly dry food which was weighed out and were never overweight) but I do think that carbs contribute to obesity in cats.
I pre measure and then fill for the day /// one cat was slightly over wt but like 5% or a half lb... My younger one eats double what the bag says and doesnt gain..
post #32 of 44
I have a dainty still-kitten cat, and she is free-fed dry and also gets wet.

She never eats near as much as the recommended amount, and she gets lots of exercise. For her, the recommended amount of dry is 3/4 cup, her bowl is about 1 cup and it takes her 3 or 4 days to eat it all. The wet is I think 2 pouches a day and she gets 1/2 one and it takes her quite a while to eat it, if I give her more she hardly touches it. So I think free-feeding is right for her.

If she was fat she wouldn't get very much dry food at all. I know someone with a fat cat who puts the dry in a coffee mug and he has to fish out every single piece individually with his paw. He's lost weight! And the two cats share the coffee mug, get wet twice a day, so they're doing well. They were eating Iams Multicat and both gained a ton of weight, got switched back and lost it right away.
post #33 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zissou'sMom
I know someone with a fat cat who puts the dry in a coffee mug and he has to fish out every single piece individually with his paw. He's lost weight!
That is a genius idea!
post #34 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plebayo
Yes, wet food leads to dirtier teeth than dry [I guess makes them dirty quicker], however if you brush your cats teeth or take them to the vet for a cleaning once in a while, it really doesn't matter.
I disagree with this statement. When cats eat dry food they either swallow it whole or break it first with the tip of the tooth and then swallow. I don't see how that can clean their teeth. I also know that if I eat dry crackers or similar items, that once it mixes with my saliva it leaves more food on my teeth than a wetter type of food.

Just my own reasoning and just my vet's observation.
post #35 of 44
Well, my dry food supposedly has something in it that slows tartar buildup? I know Z chews her food a couple times, nowhere near like a human but I hear her crunching away for a while on her back teeth.

Don't worry, she eats wet! And I brush her teeth. I don't buy her dry food because of the dental benefits, so I never really thought about it. She's not a year old yet, but her pearly whites are gorgeous and she doesn't have any plaque.

What about flouridated water? Like, just the city water (supposedly where I live has some of the best water in America) Does it matter?
post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plebayo
Dry feeding isn't responsible for fat cats. Most people who feed dry free feed it. Dry is meant to be MEASURED. If you read the bag it'll say how much you should feed.

If you look at Science Diet [only using an example] For a 5lb cat who is 4-6 months old they should get 5/8 of a cup DAILY. I of course always felt bad, so my cat was roughly eating 1 cup a day.

Most people who feed dry, fill the bowl and leave it out all day. For those who have obese cats, ask them how much they play with them. Aside from over feeding many obese cats are cats that live indoors, and don't get much activity.

Cats can live on dry food and not be overweight. But you can't keep their dish full 24/7.
If dry food isn't responsible for making cats overweight then how come even though I don't free feed, and even though I feed less than the reccommended amount, and even though the dry food fed is very limited because I feed wet food, my cat Spotty is almost 16 pounds? I think some cats handle carbs better than others. Some cats just naturally have better metabolisms but some other cats will gain weight on dry food, even if the dry food is measured. Maybe it's because I live in a small condominium and the balcony is the only outside enclosure I can provide for them. Could a millionaire please buy me a 2 story house and a yard so my cats can get their exercise running up and down the stairs, chasing da bird and run into a spacious outdoor enclosure with the most luxuriously tall cat trees in the world?
post #37 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by SophieC
The vet that was seeing my cat about his UTI....he's not an older doctor....I'd say he's mid 30's. I talked to him about this recently.....told him what I have been reading on these forums about dry vs. wet. He said as long as the cat is drinking enough water, there is no need to put him on wet food. On the other hand, if your cat drank very little, he said he would suggest wet food to help keep the cat hydrated.
That's basically accurate, except that cats very nearly cannot drink enough water to stay properly hydrated on an all dry diet. Cats are, biologically speaking, desert dwelling animals. That means they have developed as an animal that has a very low thirst drive. They are biologically designed to meet the vast majority of their water needs through consumption of prey (which, of course, contains a large percentage of water). A cat does not feel thirsty until he is significantly dehydrated.

Cats need wet food to keep them hydrated simply because they are cats! We cannot feed them a diet that bears no resemblance to the one they are biologically designed to eat and expect no consequences. This is why most cats over age 10 or so have some degree of kidney disease (even those who have no symptoms still have kidney deterioration that is very evident when the kidneys are visually examined on a postmortem exam), and why conditions such as urinary blockages are so common in cats.
post #38 of 44
I posted this to another thread recently and thought of this one....so I'm going to post it here also. I forgot that I had this book and went back to chapter 2.

Removing food between meals....

Has anyone ever done this? I used to. I stopped when my cat's vet told me she had never heard about what I told her. It was interesting how after I stopped doing that, my cat developed his first UTI. This was one of the reasons I had started it in the first place....to prevent UTIs. I got my information from a book I have called The New Natural Cat: A Complete Guide for Finicky Owners by Anitra Frazier with Norma Eckroate. Anitra Frazier is a nationally known feline nutritionist, groomer, & behaviorist. If anyone out there is interested in reading more about this, send me a PM with your email address and I will scan the pertinent sections of the book and send them your way. I will have to scan this at work tomorrow and my personal computer is down at the moment getting some work done on it. I'm using my mother's computer.
post #39 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite
I disagree with this statement. When cats eat dry food they either swallow it whole or break it first with the tip of the tooth and then swallow. I don't see how that can clean their teeth. I also know that if I eat dry crackers or similar items, that once it mixes with my saliva it leaves more food on my teeth than a wetter type of food.

Just my own reasoning and just my vet's observation.
I don't know. Polly used to eat only dry, and when she was diagnosed with cystitis, she was put on a (mostly) wet diet. I let her have some dry, but I really try to limit it. Once she went on the wet diet, she developed gingivitis within 5 months. Her teeth were relatively clean however. *shrugs* I don't know why the wet food gave her gingivitis. My vet had the same experience with her cat, Barley, when he had to go on a wet food diet for cystitis. That being said, I started brushing her teeth 3 times a week with special toothpaste from my vet's office (vanilla-mint flavored, yum!) and now the gingivitis is almost gone. So it seems preventable as long as you are willing to brush your cat's teeth a couple times a week. It doesn't take long at all.

Now I just wish I could brush Prego's teeth. I love the way the toothpaste makes Polly's breath all minty fresh!
post #40 of 44
My vet told me to feed them as much wet food as I can afford to give, and make up the balance of thier diet in dry. Since doing that (they get a pouch or small can in the morning to share and a 5 oz can in the evening to share, and dry out all the time although they eat very little of it. A couple times a week I give them some extra canned, too.) they have lost thier excess weight, gotten more active, better skin/coat, etc. So, in seeing the difference in my cats, I would say that my vet's advice was dead on. I really consider dry food, even very high quality dry (mine have Felidae) to be pretty much junk food. Takes too much grain to hold the kibble together.
post #41 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by moggiegirl
Could a millionaire please buy me a 2 story house and a yard so my cats can get their exercise running up and down the stairs, chasing da bird and run into a spacious outdoor enclosure with the most luxuriously tall cat trees in the world?
And then one for me?

I told my vet that I was feeding my girl a mix of high quality dry and wet a minimum of once a day. She told me that my kitty has me wrapped around her paw, and that all she feeds HER cats is IAMS dry, and that's all I really need to give my Ginger. What a crock!

I'm not planning to bring Ginger back to them. Fortunately, there are at least a half dozen vet clinics in my local area.
post #42 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by GingersMom
And then one for me?

I told my vet that I was feeding my girl a mix of high quality dry and wet a minimum of once a day. She told me that my kitty has me wrapped around her paw, and that all she feeds HER cats is IAMS dry, and that's all I really need to give my Ginger. What a crock!

I'm not planning to bring Ginger back to them. Fortunately, there are at least a half dozen vet clinics in my local area.
Don't get mad at the vet. Unfortunately they don't usually know a lot about nutrition - they get very minimal knowledge in this area at med school.

I kind of treat it like anything else - if I want information about plumbing, I'll go to a plumber, an electrician I'll ask an electrician. I wouldn't expect the plumber to know a lot about electricity. It's possible he might, but more likely he wouldn't.

Having said that, I wouldn't want anyone other than a vet treating my kitties for medical problems but will get my nutrition information elsewhere.
post #43 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite
Don't get mad at the vet. Unfortunately they don't usually know a lot about nutrition - they get very minimal knowledge in this area at med school.
Actually, it's only one of a few reasons why I am not going to bring Ginger back to this particular vet. Add in: unnecessary tests that cost over $100 (testing her for cat scratch fever at 10 months old when I'd had her for 8 months and been kitten scratched to pieces already - totally unnecessary!!) Add in: the fact that they never called me to check to see if I'd found Ginger after she got out this weekend. I'd left flyers on their door, and on some other vet clinics, and the others all took the time to call me to make sure I'm okay and to see if Ginger came home, but not THIS vet! Add in: the fact that her services are more expensive than others in the area. Expensive does not equal better.

Don't mean to hijack the thread, but not all vets have a whole clue. Just like people doctors, for every vet that graduated at the top of their class, there are hundreds of them out there in practice that graduated in the BOTTOM of their class!
post #44 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by GingersMom
Actually, it's only one of a few reasons why I am not going to bring Ginger back to this particular vet. Add in: unnecessary tests that cost over $100 (testing her for cat scratch fever at 10 months old when I'd had her for 8 months and been kitten scratched to pieces already - totally unnecessary!!) Add in: the fact that they never called me to check to see if I'd found Ginger after she got out this weekend. I'd left flyers on their door, and on some other vet clinics, and the others all took the time to call me to make sure I'm okay and to see if Ginger came home, but not THIS vet! Add in: the fact that her services are more expensive than others in the area. Expensive does not equal better.

Don't mean to hijack the thread, but not all vets have a whole clue. Just like people doctors, for every vet that graduated at the top of their class, there are hundreds of them out there in practice that graduated in the BOTTOM of their class!
I hear ya! And I would change vets too if I experienced the same as you with this vet.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cat Nutrition
TheCatSite.com › Forums › Our Feline Companions › Cat Nutrition › Unexpected advice from the vet: feed dry