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Kitten Food for senior cat? Senior Food for kitten?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
all right, I recently got a kitten (10 weeks) and I all ready have an elderly cat (15 years) and so I have Senior Cat food and Kitten food. Kate, my senior cat, well, I switched her to a differnt kind of cat food and she loves it, but she lovesthe kitten food and will eat it if it's sitting out, but once i caught her in the cubard eating the kitten food, and then its all the other way around for the kitten!! i just wanted to make sure that it's okay for both of them. they're both still perfectly healthy and active, but i don't want the kitten to not be as strong he's supposed to be or whatever when he gets older
thanks!
post #2 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Catz_Rule
she lovesthe kitten food and will eat it if it's sitting out, but once i caught her in the cubard eating the kitten food, and then its all the other way around for the kitten!!
I think this is the norm!

I am getting a new kitten and I currently have 2 seniors. My vet has told me it is very important to eat the correct food for whatever stage in life the cat may be. She said the kitten needs to eat kitten food until it is at least 6 months old. Dr. S. said the only way to handle it would be to not free feed dry! My cats are NOT going to like that. Dr. S. said to give the cats canned/dry and then pick it up.
post #3 of 21
This is one of the few times I recommend all stage food which is really just adult food with enough of protein to sustain a kitten and enough vitamins and mineral s to take care of a senior///

If that is not an option ( ie senior kitty has an issue ) try feeding the kitten seprately.... kitten food is too high in dry protein for a senior cat
post #4 of 21
It's really not to big of a deal because the foods are relitively close.

I don't know which senior cat food you have but generally speaking senior cat food address the following: Weight management, urinary tract health, hip & joint support, healthy heart & eyes, and kidney function & digestion.

With all that being said I've seen senior ingredients exactly the same as their kitten counter part of the same brand with the exception of a 5% dry matter reduction in protein and fat.

Cats tend to eat a lot more at a wet food sitting then a dry. My point is an option for you might be to do a combo meal.

Scenero 1)
Dry Free feed both cats with Senior food. Seperately feed the kitten wet food locked in a room by himself 2 or 3 meals a day. The kitten will eat so much that he will maybe nibble on some senior but not by much to short him of any fat or protein.

Scenero 2)
Wet feed both cats in seperate rooms.

Scenero 3)
If The senior is not over weight feed him an adult food which is basically the same as kitten food. The Kitten can eat the adult food dry or wet.
I've seen identical labels of kitten food and adult food in which the only difference was the kibble size in dry and wet as the same.

You know your cats better then anyone, simply error to the safe side in a measurable manner using protein and fat as the key decision measurable factors.
post #5 of 21
[quote=BMW Guy]It's really not to big of a deal because the foods are relitively close.

I don't know which senior cat food you have but generally speaking senior cat food address the following: Weight management, urinary tract health, hip & joint support, healthy heart & eyes, and kidney function & digestion.

With all that being said I've seen senior ingredients exactly the same as their kitten counter part of the same brand with the exception of a 5% dry matter reduction in protein and fat.



Scenero 3)
If The senior is not over weight feed him an adult food which is basically the same as kitten food. The Kitten can eat the adult food dry or wet.
I've seen identical labels of kitten food and adult food in which the only difference was the kibble size in dry and wet as the same.
Just curious which foods this came from???

WHat foods are that close/// I know many that protein is only 5-6% different but that can be light and day in some instances....
But the fat leval is 7% different and the protein is 7%( example of the kitten vs senior I feed) the kitten is much richer and calorie wise has about 5% more which = 20 kcal per hundred or 80 a day for an ave kitty///
post #6 of 21
I'd like to piggyback on this - What if your senior cat is pretty thin and has no hormonal/organ issues? Could it eat kitten food? I'd like to see her keep on her weight a bit more.
post #7 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by kluchetta
I'd like to piggyback on this - What if your senior cat is pretty thin and has no hormonal/organ issues? Could it eat kitten food? I'd like to see her keep on her weight a bit more.
If feeding a quality kitten wet or homemade/raw ... Yes ... Dry no because it could lead to issues not present yet
post #8 of 21
I have a similar problem with a 9 year old on adult food and a kitten on kitten food. They both like what they're supposed to eat but given half a chance will swap places. I feed them at meal times (no free feeding) and have to stand over them as they eat as the minute my back's turned they're eating each others! I give the kitten a fairly large portion and hold back a little bit of the older cat's. When the kitten has eaten as much as he wants I put what's left out of reach of both of them. If the kitten wants more later I put his bowl down again for him and give my other cat the small amount I put by so that he doessn't feel left out. I still have to stand over them though to make sure my older cat doesn't help himself to kitten food.
post #9 of 21
I have a 1 yr old and 15 yr old and feed them both the same food - Iams Multicat. They both are fine with it. In some ways (except for the higher calorie kitten food) I don't believe in "speciality" foods. Unless your cat really needs special foods most are fine with normal cat food.
post #10 of 21
Thread Starter 
cool. in case this helps, both my cats eat Science diet, and the senior is a bit overweight, but has no health problems
post #11 of 21
To avoid possible issues feed them age appropriate foods...I urge you to talk with your vet...

I am unfamiliar with SD kitten % profile but I do know one of there seniors is 29% protein which is great for an older cat in a dry food...PS have you read the ingrediants your babies are eating>>>??
post #12 of 21
There is a very heated ongoing debate spreading throughout the different cat forums regarding feeding kitten food to adult cats. Tens of thousands of posts had been posted about this matter. This is a bigger debate than you guys think!!!

I personally believe adult cats under five could benefit from kitten foods. They are generally very high in protein and taurine, and the manufacturs are supposed to make them more digestible.
post #13 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharky
To avoid possible issues feed them age appropriate foods...I urge you to talk with your vet...

I am unfamiliar with SD kitten % profile but I do know one of there seniors is 29% protein which is great for an older cat in a dry food...PS have you read the ingrediants your babies are eating>>>??
I think Sharky has given the best advice. I think my vet is probably more educated about catfood than I am so I am going to have to go with her recommendation.
post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by CatsRMyKids
I think my vet is probably more educated about catfood than I am
I'm not sure I agree with that! Most vets (like most human doctors) are very poorly educated about nutrition. And unless they keep up with the latest research once they qualify all they can do is repeat what they were told in vet school which might be outdated. Many vets still insist that dry food is better for the teeth despite lots of recent research disproving that. By all means listen to your vet but do your own research too.
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbantigers
Many vets still insist that dry food is better for the teeth despite lots of recent research disproving that.
I have just adopted a 13 yr. old cat who prefers canned food, but I mix in alot of dry since I have always been told cats need dry to keep healthy teeth. She has no problem eating dry, she just prefers canned. What is the recent research your refering to?
post #16 of 21
[quote=sharky]
Quote:
Originally Posted by BMW Guy
WHat foods are that close/// I know many that protein is only 5-6% different but that can be light and day in some instances....
But the fat leval is 7% different and the protein is 7%( example of the kitten vs senior I feed) the kitten is much richer and calorie wise has about 5% more which = 20 kcal per hundred or 80 a day for an ave kitty///
I just rounded to 5. some were both 5%, yes some had a couple percent difference such as 7%. Which is not much if she feeds the kitten seperate wet by himself of kitten food. If the kitten free feeds some senior once in awhile and it's 7% less fat thats not going to effect him.
post #17 of 21
I agree that most vets really don't know feeding/nutrition issues. They sell Science Diet and that food is not good for my rexes. In fact, they refuse to eat it. Rexes are not "picky cats"

I also know they don't know about feeding as they think my rexes should weigh the same as normal DSH's - they shouldn't! And if I fed my rex kittens on kitten food for a year - like it's "recommended", they would be very much overweight.

So my rex kittens only eat kitten food to 4-5 months old - then they are on adult food. My oldest rex (a good friend adopted her when I moved) is 17 yrs old and my 2nd oldest is 15 yrs old - both are in pretty good shape for their ages. And both have eaten Iams their entire lives.

If I listened to a vet on feeding/nutrition, then my cats would not look the way they do!
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by resturgis
I have just adopted a 13 yr. old cat who prefers canned food, but I mix in alot of dry since I have always been told cats need dry to keep healthy teeth. She has no problem eating dry, she just prefers canned. What is the recent research your refering to?
Here are few links

http://www.littlebigcat.com/index.ph...dcleantheteeth

http://www.softrain.com/natpaws/drjudy2.htm

http://www.allourpets.com/holistic/dental-care.shtml

There's still controversy over this issue and some still say that dry food does contribute to dental care, but many vets are now agreeing that dry food does't really make any difference (unless it's specifically formulated for dental health). Until fairly recently vets were taught that dry food was better for their teeth and most continue to relay this information to cat owners despite it becoming outdated advice. I still feed some dry to my cats as it's convenient, cost effective and I like them to get a bit of crunch in their food but I no longer kid myself it's helping their teeth.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenKitty45
And if I fed my rex kittens on kitten food for a year - like it's "recommended", they would be very much overweight.
I'm finding that with my 5 month old kitten. He's looking distinctly chubby these days! Once he's finished the kitten food I've already bought I'm putting him on adult.
post #19 of 21
here's my two cents.
with my momma cat and her kitten...i was having problems finding a food . I tried everything. I found Life's Abundance dry which both can eat. They have now come out with a wet canned food, which i started this week...no problems and he loves it.
All the other foods I have tried, authority, innova evo, natural balance and another I have forgotten the name, gave them gas, diarrhea, constipated them or a variety of these .
you can read about it at http://www.healthypetnet.com and compare the ingredients. and no i do not sell it. It just worked for my furbabies.
post #20 of 21
I find most kitten wet food is much more dense and see a big difference when MAia eats kitten vs cat. I feed her Iams adult almost as much as Nutro kitten because she is an eating machine! I figure adult less calorie but as well have noticed it is more light and she is'nt as satisfied as with the kitten......
I heard from someone that kittens should'nt eat canned food unless it is all natural and for kittens due to some binding agent they use........Not sure about this though and she seems fine between the two.
post #21 of 21
i have the same problem with my 16 year old and 10 week old kitties. I have to leave the house for 6 hours per day so during the day i free feed with regular food. However at night when the kitten is shut in the kitchen (the only way i can get any sleep!) i give her kitten food and my older cat who has the rest of the house has senior food. They both tend to eat more during the night anyway so i'm happy that most of their intake is from the right stuff.
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