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Rats and hamsters or other small animals

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
This may be a ridiculous question but can hamsters and rats live together? I highly HIGHLY doubt the answer is yes but curious as to whether or not you can mix the two. Neither are agressive, all of them eat the same foods pretty much and they are the same exact size. Figured it would be worth it to ask...basically are there ANY small rodent type animals that you can mix and match?
post #2 of 26
The answer is a resounding NO.
The only mix I know of that works is gerbils and hamsters, and even then you have to start when they are barely walking.

The rats may not be aggressive, but rats, by their very nature are opportunistic feeders and will view the smaller hamsters as nothing more than prey.
post #3 of 26
I concur. The hamster will be dinner to the rat.
No-go.
post #4 of 26
Rat will say HAHAHA Lunch.
post #5 of 26
We've successfuly paired Dwarf hamsters with mice, but I don't know if rats and hamsters would work.
The larger Syrian hamster are supposed to be solitary animals that don't do well with others, and the more social dwarf hamsters may be too small to live with a rat.
Though if you raised the rat from a baby and introduced it to an adult hamster that may work. I've heard that rats are highly trainable and sociable, but I don't know if you could train one to get along with another species.
~Julia
post #6 of 26
Am not sure I want to even test that out..
post #7 of 26
Thread Starter 
Ok, I REALLY didn't think so. The rats, however, are the same exact size as the hamsters, but ya, I didn't think it would work. Just checking, thanks guys.
post #8 of 26
Thread Starter 
I went ahead and picked up two of the most adorable 7 week old rats today. I am so dumb, when mine had babies, I gave them away but then here I go out and get some. Some guy dumped them at the local pet supplies shop and I was there so I took them. They are sooo sweet and my big old rats seem to love them. They immediately sniffed then started grooming them. I overwhelmed them with rat treats. I think I like rats better then hamsters anyways, except those little dwarf hamsters who sleep upside down in a little ball
post #9 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlutgendorf
We've successfuly paired Dwarf hamsters with mice, but I don't know if rats and hamsters would work.
The larger Syrian hamster are supposed to be solitary animals that don't do well with others, and the more social dwarf hamsters may be too small to live with a rat.
Though if you raised the rat from a baby and introduced it to an adult hamster that may work. I've heard that rats are highly trainable and sociable, but I don't know if you could train one to get along with another species.
~Julia
Yes, Hamsters and mice are different. Rats are opportunistic omnivorous feeders. They shouldn't be trusted with Hamsters, Mice, or Birds as they will be the aggressor instinctually. It doesn't matter the size. When my rats were young adolescents, they could be seen carrying away chicken drumsticks twice their size!!

Congrats to the OP on the new additions! Rats are alot of fun...
post #10 of 26
My son is going to be 10 May 30th he wants a snake... That means I have to feed rats to it I cant do it...
post #11 of 26
Buy prekilled frozen, much safer for the snake, and much easier on you

If it's his first snake I recommend a cornsnake (smallish but beautiful colors, ver docile), or a ball python (also smallish, not as colorful, but also very docile with regular handling).
post #12 of 26
I want small and non threatning. Easy maintenace. python doesn't sound like what I want lol
post #13 of 26
Don't let the name python fool you, ball pythons are very small.
They get thick bodied rather than long.
I've rarely seen an adult Ball more than 5 feet long.
Their habit is to tightly roll into a ball with their head hidden if they feel threatened, hence the name Ball python.

Ball Pythons
Corn Snakes
post #14 of 26
Ok different snake please. 5 feet still to much for me.
post #15 of 26
Most all docile species are around 5 feet at adulthood.
post #16 of 26
Thread Starter 
Way back when, I started out with a Garden Snake. Nothing special, they stay around a foot or two long. I fed goldfish and crickets I think.

Ball pythons are great too. They are very friendly. My biggest only ever got 3 feet long. I may have stunted their growth a bit however because I was told by the pet store people to feed once a week or every other week which is inaccurate for a baby snake. They need to eat more often.

Do research first. They are easy to care for, but they need proper amounts of light, certain types of light, certain amounts of darkness, certain humidity and certain temperature in order to be happy and shed correctly.
post #17 of 26
My son is researching. I just dont think I can say yes
post #18 of 26
My baby Balls ate every other day, as adults they only ate every other week.
post #19 of 26
Rat says "MMMMMM.................Lunch "
post #20 of 26
I just wanted to give you an idea of another pet that you MIGHT be interested in, 'momor3rugrats'...Well, one that your son might be interested in...lol! I have heard that another reptile that makes a great pet is a Bearded Dragon...I know that they obviously aren't a snake, but they are said to be the only lizard that actually shows affection, or at least they are known for their being able to show affection, so I just wanted to let you know, in case your kid might also be interested in that possibility! A site that you could check out if you are interested in it would be:
http://exoticpets.about.com/cs/lizar...deddragons.htm
post #21 of 26
Well I got him fan tail fish in a 29 gal aquarium I will post pic later.
post #22 of 26
I do not recommend omnivorous/herbivorous reptiles for kids simply because there is a lot of work involved in caring for them properly.
post #23 of 26
I agree nephew has one and he killed the other forgot to feed it. I want something easy for him. He loves it so far..
post #24 of 26
Bearded Dragons are a great reptile. They are one of the more "human friendly" species. Green anoles are also very good for beginners.

For snakes, I'd go with a garter snake or a ribbon snake. They stay nice and small.
post #25 of 26
Hamsters and rats are both gross in the sense they will even eat each other. I've seen people keep rats together successfully more often than hamsters, but having more than one hamster in a cage past babyhood is asking for disaster... they are just solitary animals...
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by pondwader
I've seen people keep rats together successfully more often than hamsters.
This is how rats should exist as they are pack animals by nature and need the mental and physical stimulation of their cagemates. Solitary rats don't do as well.
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