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Administering medicine last resort method

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hello all,

I just wanted to pass along some information on giving meds to uncooperative kitties. I have read all the posts and threads on this issue and none of the methods have worked for me. Not that the suggestions are not good, just that my newly adopted cat, Brandon, is way too crafty.

My vet suggested having an animal compounding pharmacy create a compound with the medicine in treat form. I am going to try it and will let you know if it worked. If anyone else has tried this, I would appreciate your feedback. I asked for tuna flavor. It is quite expensive, $58.00 for a ten day supply of antibiotics. I realize not everyone can afford this, me included, but at this point I am desparate. I'll keep you posted.
post #2 of 15
Just a little heads up - some pills do not desolve well and settle as gritt on the bottom so make sure you shake the bottle thoroughly before taking out meds.
post #3 of 15
Crt- We have one of those pharmacies in our area too. Yep, it's expensive, but when all else fails, it's worth a try. We used compounding for a liquid med, also tuna flavored, and it worked well.

Hope you have success too.


PS Congratulations on your adoption of Brandon!!!
post #4 of 15
I agree! Using a compounding pharmacy and having them mix the antibiotic is a GREAT idea! Even if the price is a little more, at least you know that your kitty is getting the drugs, as opposed to them spitting out the pills later on.

Our kitty was on antibiotics for a while, and seemed to do well on the chicken flavor. She still protested when we gave it to her though.

But she is also on a lifetime of methimazole for her hyperthyroid. The pharmacy mixed it up in a transdermal gel. HOW EASY THIS IS! A teeny amount from a syringe onto the tip of a (gloved!) finger, and rub it into the pinna of her ear. No problem! The pharmacist told us that antibiotics are also available in this form, so thats the way we're going from now on.

Good luck!
post #5 of 15
i agree that compounding can make life much easier . but i need to give my $.02 about two things:

1) i've spoken to three separate vets, and all three have agreed that MOST antibiotics can NOT be formulated into a transdermal gel. (we did the gel on mabel for her prednisolone). what i mean is, it can be made into the gel, but it's not nearly as effective. just a thought.

and

2) those compounded treats are expensive, and the cats don't always like them. i had an antihistamine compounded into a chicken flavor treat, and roxy gets it in her mouth and promptly spits it out. she also has a hard time chewing them. just another thought.
post #6 of 15
I've had an awful time pilling Autumn. 3 pills a day, antihistimine and predinilisone. But I think I lucked out because I found a soft treat she loves and have been able to push the pill inside. I'm waiting for the moment when she realizes what I'm doing though....
post #7 of 15
Yeah, I tried putting scully's pill inside a treat and he nearly choked on it, I got a few scratches from trying to make him swallow it but it was a lot easier than coaxing him to eat a treat while he is already feeling unwell
post #8 of 15
Another "last resort" is learning to give injections. Our last cat had been a feral for 8 years before we took him in, and "pilling" him was out of the question. Hubby is an RN, and I took some night school nursing classes to "qualify" to give injections, etc., and that's the route we take. Naturally, it doesn't work for all types of medications, but I've found administering shots is a lot easier than giving pills.
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcat
Another "last resort" is learning to give injections. Our last cat had been a feral for 8 years before we took him in, and "pilling" him was out of the question. Hubby is an RN, and I took some night school nursing classes to "qualify" to give injections, etc., and that's the route we take. Naturally, it doesn't work for all types of medications, but I've found administering shots is a lot easier than giving pills.
This is what we have to do with Much. She has a sensitive esophagus and will upchuck liquids and pills after 15-20 minutes. There still is some technique required to keep her still. But a lot easier than shoving something down her throat.
post #10 of 15
I have lucked out with medicating my cats, never had any problem. I mean, they don't like it but if I just scruff them, no problem. When I worked at the shelter I had to give pills to this half feral cat who would scream and bite and scratch with all her strength whever anyone tried. She was a tough one. I was the only one there half the time that could medicate her.
post #11 of 15
My vet recommended these as an option this last time we had to put Callie on an antibiotic. He sent home some plain samples just to make sure she'd eat them. We ended up not needing to get the medicated ones because she did fine with me just crushing her pill into her wet food, but if she starts to not tolerate the meds in her food, I'm going with the treats.

Stephanie
post #12 of 15
We just got the pill pockets (treats with hole in centre for pills). We put 1/2 a pill in each treat and gave the kitties their Drontil - no muss, no fuss - where were these things before!
post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks to all of you for the feedback. I'm sad to say the compounding did not work and I am so discouraged after my original optimism. Since the antibiotic is in liquid form, the treats are a gooey mess. Brandon wouldn't touch them. The vet said that the pill form of the meds is very bitter, which is why they gave me liquid. It is Flagyl (sp).

I am able to get most of the medicine down him once I catch him, but the catching him is the problem. He now hides under the bed or sofa most of the time I'm home in order to avoid it. When he does come out, I try to give him loving and play time and not grab him right away, but sometimes that is just not practical, like in the morning when I have to get to work. He is also figuring out all of my tricks to get him to come out of hiding. I'm afraid he is going to always be afraid of me now. And, I don't know if I can come up with enough tricks for 5 more days of meds. Anyway, thanks for listening and hopefully the next medication I have to give him will be a pill I can disguise.
post #14 of 15
can you mix the liquid meds into tuna juice? or a tiny bit of "easy cheese" (cheese in a can)? or any other human food that he likes as a treat? it's not like you'll be giving him food that's bad for him for an extended period of time....just 5 more days, right? you could also try mixing it in chicken broth (made with chicken bullion [sp?]) - but just a LITTLE BIT of that. it's very salty (which might overpower the flavor of the liquid). good luck!
post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 
I have tried mixing the liquid medicine in tuna, but I guess he noticed the medicinal taste and only ate a little. I'll try just tuna juice and if that doesn't work, then the broth. Yes, it is twice a day for 5 more days. Thanks for the suggestion!
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