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Feline Leukemia shot

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
How does everyone feel about vaccinating cats for feline leukemia. My cats live outside confined within a fence. We are in a remote area where they have no exposure to other cats. My vet likes to give this shot yearly. What are your opinions.
post #2 of 20
My two are indoors at all times so i don't bother with the Leukemia shot and only give them the flu/enteritis because i know i can pass things on to them otherwise.

My vet once asked " But what if they got outside?", but i like to think i make " extra " sure that that doesn't happen.
post #3 of 20
welll.. would it be possible for other cats to get into their enclosure?

FeLV is most often transmitted through bite wounds, so if another kitty got in with yours and there was a fight, there could be problems.

I'm not completely sure how I feel about it. My cats don't go outside ever and where I live now there is no way they could accidentally get out unless someone went to the trouble to steal them.
post #4 of 20
my vet recommended against it since Zoey only has exposure to Kandie and vice versus///
post #5 of 20
even if you did your kitties done, it is only about 85 % effective... and FeLV can be spread much more easily than bite wounds. Sharing food, water, litterboxes, community grooming. I honestly wouldn't worry about it, if you leave in a remote area in highly unlikely that a "rogue" positive will turn up, its more of a problem in dense colonies
post #6 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by katiemae1277
even if you did your kitties done, it is only about 85 % effective... and FeLV can be spread much more easily than bite wounds. Sharing food, water, litterboxes, community grooming. I honestly wouldn't worry about it, if you leave in a remote area in highly unlikely that a "rogue" positive will turn up, its more of a problem in dense colonies

oh yes, I know there are other ways it could be spread.
I was just thinking that would be the main way her cats could catch it.. if another cat got into their enclosure and there was a fight.
post #7 of 20
My vet recommends against it for mine since they're indoor only (except the porch). My only concern would be if I ended up bringing an untested stray/rescue into the house, but I've got the space to keep them completely separated.
post #8 of 20
Thread Starter 
Thanks for your response. I never see any cats here except my two in the yard. There have been none in my yard, however I have had coons and possums inside the enclosure where the cats are. There is never any food left out. Their water bowl is on the step going out the back door. I would not put another cat with them unless it was tested for the leukemia.
post #9 of 20
Has anyone heard about the vaccine causing sarcomas?
post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by sphynxkitten
Has anyone heard about the vaccine causing sarcomas?

Yep, but its really rare.
That's why they always give the vaccine in one of the rear legs, so that if a sarcoma developed they could remove the leg.
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by sphynxkitten
Has anyone heard about the vaccine causing sarcomas?
Theres been a lot of talk about it, but as yet nothing has been proved 100%.

I know over here in the UK my vet said theres talks going on now to see if they really need the leukemia shot every year and not every 3 or something?.

My parents had cats since i was as young as 7 and they had the leukemia shots with no sarcomas, and i'm 47 now.
post #12 of 20
Susan, we (in the UK) have a different vaccination for it, therefore vaccination sarcoma is extremely rare here!

I don't get the FeLV vaccination to my cats as they are on harnesses and leads whilst outside with no threat of fighting, grooming etc of other cats. (I chose this after discussion with my vet and he said there is no need to vaccinate against something that isn't a threat in our circumstances)
post #13 of 20
Having recently lost a beautiful, 2 yr. old tuxedo to FeLV, I quickly had his mother and brother tested, fearing the worst, and they fortunately tested negative. I then had them vaccinated. All three stayed primarily in our backyard and were in and out during the course of the day. We do not have a concentration of cats in the neighborhood, as we are spaced pretty far apart and are in a wooded area. Due to the contagious nature of the disease, I can only guess that Gateway, the tuxedo, must have picked it up from either a stray that wandered in the yard or perhaps a neighborhood cat that passed through - although I've rarely witnessed either and I work out of my home.

For me it was peace of mind to have Carmen and Voodoo vaccinated - the potential benefits outweighed the potential risks. Additionally, Gateway's illness came on suddenly and was fast and furious. He was a 13 lb. muscular cat and was gone within a week. I wanted to avoid repeating that scenario as much as possible - it took its' toll on all of us here - Carmen and Voodoo, included.
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kittybosanta
Having recently lost a beautiful, 2 yr. old tuxedo to FeLV, I quickly had his mother and brother tested, fearing the worst, and they fortunately tested negative. I then had them vaccinated. All three stayed primarily in our backyard and were in and out during the course of the day. We do not have a concentration of cats in the neighborhood, as we are spaced pretty far apart and are in a wooded area. Due to the contagious nature of the disease, I can only guess that Gateway, the tuxedo, must have picked it up from either a stray that wandered in the yard or perhaps a neighborhood cat that passed through - although I've rarely witnessed either and I work out of my home.

For me it was peace of mind to have Carmen and Voodoo vaccinated - the potential benefits outweighed the potential risks. Additionally, Gateway's illness came on suddenly and was fast and furious. He was a 13 lb. muscular cat and was gone within a week. I wanted to avoid repeating that scenario as much as possible - it took its' toll on all of us here - Carmen and Voodoo, included.
I'm so glad to hear that Carmen and Voodoo didn't have it! What luck.... very sorry to hear about Gateways' passing
post #15 of 20
Thread Starter 
Thanks to Kittybosanto, I can feel that my cats do need this vaccination.
I know some folks don't do this shot. My vet says since my cats are outside, even though they are confined within a fence with no contact to other cats, that they need this shot. I guess I will continue the yearly boosters.
post #16 of 20
Neither of my two are vaccinated against it, despite having outdoor access. I have heard of kittens dying after being given the vaccine, and my local CP lady told me about a seminar she went to where they said that older cats who had outdoor access would have their own immunity to it, and her vet also told her the same, so I refused to let mine be done. The vet who vaccinated them didn't even want to test them before giving it, and told me she had never seen any side effects from it in 8 years of vaccinating - my CP branch have known at least 3 kittens die from it though, and I know another person in rescue who have known kittens die from it.
post #17 of 20
I choose not to vaccinate my cats for this because 30% of cats become immune on their own, 30% become carriers and of these 10% recover, and only 40% of cats actually get sick and die. My cats are allowed outside in an outside enclosure and I do bring home strays on average once a year. I just dont feel the risk is high enough for me to have them vaccinated for something they could build their own immunity to. Plus I have read the vaccination is only 80% effective.
post #18 of 20
I don't vaccinate my cats against it as they're indoor cats and have no contact with other cats. My vet says they don't need it. They did have it once a few years ago as the vet was out of their usual vaccine and the only one they had in was a 3 in 1 that included the leukaemia vaccine. No adverse reactions but I'd rather not take the risk if they don't need it.
post #19 of 20
I'd say to only get it if you KNEW your cat was being exposed to a positive cat. In which case, you'd do well to go with the new(er) Merial vaccine adminstered through the high pressure jet thing (The "vet jet")
post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kittybosanta
Having recently lost a beautiful, 2 yr. old tuxedo to FeLV, I quickly had his mother and brother tested, fearing the worst, and they fortunately tested negative. I then had them vaccinated. All three stayed primarily in our backyard and were in and out during the course of the day. We do not have a concentration of cats in the neighborhood, as we are spaced pretty far apart and are in a wooded area. Due to the contagious nature of the disease, I can only guess that Gateway, the tuxedo, must have picked it up from either a stray that wandered in the yard or perhaps a neighborhood cat that passed through - although I've rarely witnessed either and I work out of my home.

For me it was peace of mind to have Carmen and Voodoo vaccinated - the potential benefits outweighed the potential risks. Additionally, Gateway's illness came on suddenly and was fast and furious. He was a 13 lb. muscular cat and was gone within a week. I wanted to avoid repeating that scenario as much as possible - it took its' toll on all of us here - Carmen and Voodoo, included.
I went through an anlmost identical situation this winter, where I lost an 8 month old kitten within 3 weeks...it seems that even with aggressive treatment, that's as long as we could keep her. I did have my older cat, who tested negative in a serioes of tests, vaccinated. He has had no issues and the 2 cats I took in subsequently also have no issues....thank goodness the virus is so weak once it's outside cats!
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