TheCatSite.com › Forums › Feral Cats and Rescue › Caring for Strays and Ferals › Moving away - what about "my" ferals?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Moving away - what about "my" ferals?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Hello,

My main concern is really for one beautiful kitty that shows up at my house for dinner everyday. I recently posted about whether I should try to take him to the vet. He's between 6 and 10 and has an ear infection. Yesterday, he let me pet him before I even distracted him with food. I feed him both dry and canned everyday. He gotten pretty used to me and his free dinner.

There are also at least two other precious lives that show up each day, both are only about a year. Both I think are siblings to the feral we adopted from outside in December, and both are really afraid of people.

They live in the woods behind my house since its county land, with a creek and a few old barns. I know they've lived out there a long time and I only moved in in August 05.

When I catch him to take him to the vet, should I give him to the Lawrence Humane Society? (http://www.lawrencehumane.org/) They are a no kill shelter that keeps them until they are adopted (unless they are too sick). I almost took another feral there (we kept him instead) but they said if it did come to worse they would call me so I could come get him instead. They have another cat thats 12-13 years old that I call to check on all the time. [ I would love to take her in too. But then I'd have five cats (three plus her and the above mentioned feral) and my husband would probably divorce me. ]

We will be moving across the country in about three months. No one else feeds these cats and no one else is available to feed them. It breaks my heart that he would come looking for food and there wouldnt be any there for him. At the shelter, they could cure his ear mites, give him yummy food, and find him a forever inside home where he could be a lap cat.

What would you do?
post #2 of 14
I'd take him to the shelter. You'll just drive yourself nuts wondering how he is doing otherwise.
post #3 of 14
Take him to the no kill shelter. You will never need wonder.
I too have such a feral. I hope to adopt him to inside in time,
but if I ever move, I will have to trap him and take with, or
find someone else to feed him. But I still think the shelter is the
best bet for this old cat. You will both be better off...
post #4 of 14
absolutely I would take him to the shelter. As the previous poster said, you will drive your nuts and worry about him if you dont. awwwwww wouldnt it be great if you could take him with you though

There is loads of advise on here on how to trap your ferals - any chance you could also trap the other 2 that come to visit each day?
post #5 of 14
I agree if it is a no kill shelter he is better where he can get help. Besides your heart will pull at you if you don't because you wont know where he is or if he is safe.
post #6 of 14
Trinity - I just moved from Cass County to about 15 miles east of Lawrence. I actually moved my ferals with me and just released them back outside yesterday after a 3 week introduction period in my porch. They went from a property that was heavily wooded in back to a small subdivision where we only have 3 acres and a lake out back (very little woods). Even with the storms that are rolling thru here over the last 24 hours, they are doing very well here.

Where are you moving and is there anyway to take them with you? If the Lawrence shelter is no-kill, it is a good option, but if the cat is very feral, it will live it's life out at the shelter - few people will adopt a cat like that. My ferals are not adoptable therefore I moved them when I moved.
post #7 of 14
if the cat is very feral, it will live it's life out at the shelter - few people will adopt a cat like that. My ferals are not adoptable therefore I moved them when I moved.

I agree strongly with the above. Ferals that are brought in to a shelter enviornment usually do not do well. They become depressed, sick and besides being non-adoptable, it may become difficult to replace the cat into a colony.

Relocating the colony or cat is your best bet...in my opinion. There is a lot of good information on the internet & this site regarding "how to reolocate a feral (colony)".
post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momofmany
Where are you moving and is there anyway to take them with you? If the Lawrence shelter is no-kill, it is a good option, but if the cat is very feral, it will live it's life out at the shelter - few people will adopt a cat like that. My ferals are not adoptable therefore I moved them when I moved.
We're moving from Eudora to Portland, OR.

I would love to move him (and the rest) too, but we won't have any land. The one indoor/ outdoor formerly feral kitty we have will become indoor only. We'll be moving our three cats and five ferrets. If he moved with us, he would have to be indoors also. And thats the problem, my husband won't let me have four cats, otherwise I would socialize and adopt him in.

My husband says I shouldn't get attached and that he made his way without us for years before we arrived. And when we leave he'll go back to doing what he did before, as will the others.

For the second time yesterday, he let me pet him and purred and rubbed his head on my hand. Although if you stand he runs a few feet away, never too far though. He looks kinda rough from his life outside. His ears have been frost bitten, they're scabbed over from scratching, and his coats pretty dull. He's orange and white. I think he would become a very greatful lap cat from his recent actions while being petted. I wouldn't exactly have to trap him at this point, I could just pick him up.

The other two or three ferals are only about a year, but there's no way they allow you to get anywhere close to them. You open the door and they're already half way across the yard from the food.

Momofmany, do you know if there are any organizations/ people locally that might take him in and help him find a good home besides the LHS? Or perhaps someone that might take him on as an adoption? Or where I might ask around to find him a home like that?
post #9 of 14
I am with a local Humane Society and we do take-in ferals, try to socialize them and some do get succesfully adopted.

Do you have a Humane Society that is local?
post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 
Here is a pic of my guy:



I'm going to call Lawrence Humane Society tomorrow and ask them if there are local people or if they have people that could help this guy.
post #11 of 14
What an adorable guy in a weather-beaten, tough-life way! His scars sure do give him character - he reminds me of a Disney character. And such gorgeous colors! What a hunk!! Please keep up the good efforts on finding a good solution for this gorgeous guy!! Thanks for the pic! It really adds a personal touch to the posts! And I can visualize who I'm praying for!
post #12 of 14
Trinity -
I'm glad you're working on this situation months ahead of time, instead of just weeks or days before you move. You wouldn't believe how many people there are who think they can find a last minute solution to the dilemma of leaving ferals behind.

I agree that ferals will not do well at a shelter, but your orange & white guy is not truly feral - ferals will not approach you and let you rub their heads. He may be semi-feral, or possibly an abandoned former house cat.

The LHS has to be one of the most cheerful looking shelters I've seen. Your little guy looks like he requires a complete vet workup - are they willing and able to do that for him, since his needs may go far beyond treating ear mites? Is LHS a cageless shelter? Do they have a foster program?

It's easy for your husband to say not to get attached - when you learn how to do that, let me know (LOL). Your problem is two-fold - not only do you have to help this friendly kitty, but you need to help the other 2 or 3 feral cats as well. ALL of these cats have grown to depend on you - you've been feeding them for months. The ferals need to be spay/neutered while there are still only 2 or 3 of them. Do this ASAP or I guarantee you will start to see kittens. If you could get these cats fixed before you move, do you think the new owners would be willing to continue to feed them? If not, you need to find a local organization, or individual who works with ferals (start by asking the LHS folks) and see if you can get that person, or someone they know, to continue caring for the cats. Offer to pay for the S/N and tell them you'll provide several cases of cat food to at least help them get started.

I'm kind of amazed that LHS has offered to take your boy. All the good no-kill shelters in my area are constantly full, and have waiting lists. Even though it may not be ideal, you're fortunate to at least have this option.

Again, I commend you for caring so much for these helpless little guys, and for being wise enough to try to do something constructive for them as soon as possible.
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by catsknowme
What an adorable guy in a weather-beaten, tough-life way! His scars sure do give him character - he reminds me of a Disney character. And such gorgeous colors! What a hunk!!

He has lots of character. We actually call him Bagpuss after the UK television series. http://www.smallfilms.co.uk/bagpuss/ Its about a magical cat and his friends. They find and fix lost toys. Its a great program, a bit aged, but still timeless. It makes me cry. They might not look like much, but in our hearts they are treasures.

Emily's cat Bagpuss
The most Important
The most Beautiful
The most Magical
Saggy old cloth cat in the whole wide world

All in all, he's just an old, saggy cloth cat.
Baggy, and a bit loose at the seams.
But Emily loved him.
post #14 of 14
Aw, he looks like a real sweety..I'm sorry you have to leave him behind
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Caring for Strays and Ferals
TheCatSite.com › Forums › Feral Cats and Rescue › Caring for Strays and Ferals › Moving away - what about "my" ferals?