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A cat that must think mice are his friends

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Does anybody else have a cat that does this: The other day while I was vacuuming by the front door. I opened it and saw a mouse a few feet from my door, and my cat, Buster, was standing there looking at it. Just looking. The mouse approached my cat, and they sat there looking at each other for a few minutes. Then, the mouse came even CLOSER to Buster and he walked RIGHT IN FRONT OF HIM, so close, my cat even raised up one paw to let it go by!!! It was hilarious. The mouse just kind of scurried away and Buster, of course, just walked away to do something else. I even told my husband that I saw a mouse outside our front door and he says, "You should sick one of the cats on it," then he couldn't stop laughing when I told him what had just happened. I'll never forget this! I thought for sure Buster would go after him and try to catch him or something.
post #2 of 14
Mav has brought live mice indoors before and spent ages grooming them and trying to get them to feed from her even though she's not expressing milk!

I think she must have a vey maternal instinct.
post #3 of 14
My, oldest, Spaz, will carry mice around and guard them, like kittens.
She's always been very gentle and caring towards them, although I'm sure it's sheer terror for the poor mice.
post #4 of 14
I had a friend in high school who had a cat that would eat his weed. We watched this cat watch a mouse walk across the kitchen floor, between the cats front paws, under his belly, and between his back paws. The cat kept putting his head down to watch the mouse until it got so far he flipped over. He just stayed where he landed. My friend his his stash a little better after that.
post #5 of 14
Mousing is actually something cats have to be *taught*, it's not a hard-wired instinct. So if your cat wasn't taught to hunt by its mother as a kitten, it probably doesn't really have any idea they should be thought of as food.

I've found that hunting birds seems to be the hard-wired instinct. Not only do cats enjoy going after bugs (esp those which fly), but I got one of those stuffed toys that you find in gift stores that make real bird calls when you squeeze them. The first time I used one at home, my cat came TEARING to find the bird. He always manages to pull them down, play with them, and hide them on me.

He probably wouldn't know what to do with a real mouse if he saw one, though, bless him.
post #6 of 14
Funny you should mention birds.

When I lived in Seattle, I kept a pair of ringneck doves loose on my enclosed front porch.
I also had an old loveseat out there for the cats to enjoy the sun.

I stepped out on the porch one afternoon to see 4 cats, and 2 doves all snuggles up together on the loveseat.

Boy did my jaw hit the floor.
post #7 of 14
A friend of mine's cat used to catch mice alive and carry them unharmed into the house in the winter, so he could have fun chasing them!

I've heard of persians just sitting there watching a mouse go by. On the other hand, if a mouse ever got in our house my rex or little mixed breed would kill it
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arlyn
Funny you should mention birds.

When I lived in Seattle, I kept a pair of ringneck doves loose on my enclosed front porch.
I also had an old loveseat out there for the cats to enjoy the sun.

I stepped out on the porch one afternoon to see 4 cats, and 2 doves all snuggles up together on the loveseat.

Boy did my jaw hit the floor.
lol I'll bet. Thing is, cats can learn to be friends w/ any animal that is also taken care of by the humans they trust. I mean, cats are NOT social creatures, yet look how many co-exist happily with other cats or even dogs!

BTW, the fact that mousing is learned behaviour is why during the days of the Bubonic Plague in Europe, cats that were good mousers were sought after and many people would pay dearly for them! I find it interesting that a superstition about cats being evil and thus killing cats is what allowed the bubonic plague to proliferate, and the sudden apparent benefit to cats brought them back to such high esteem, they're very common pets now!

I remind people of that when they try to tell me cats are evil.
post #9 of 14
Actually, cat's are very social creatures.
They form families very much like those of lions when left to their own devices.

The best behavioral studies on the social structures of cat colonies was done on Rome's famous ferals.
post #10 of 14
Yeh, I've heard of feral colonies which strikes me as bizarre, as most cat species are mostly loners except during mating, gestation and rearing. Lions are the obvious exception among the larger cats, but even they do not have the same sort of "pack" mentality seen in other animals, such as dogs.

I'm curious to read up on studies done on that. There are cats that certainly seem to prefer to be left alone, but there are some who prefer the company of another cat. Perhaps the feral colonies is a recognition of "safety in numbers" when exposed to the elements, especially for domestic cats which are rather small compared to other animals such as raccoons or skunks, as opposed to the larger cats which are large enough to take care of themselves.

This, however, is speculation on my part.

Do you have any sources of information on the differences of social and communal natures in cats?
post #11 of 14
I can see if I can dig some up.

The studies I cite were in the form of a documentary that was on Discovery a few years back.
It was pretty fascinating stuff.
post #12 of 14
Good thread so far.

After reading everyone's responses, it is clear to me I didn't add enough options in my "Real Mouse, What Would Your Cat Do?" poll a while ago.

http://www.thecatsite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=74148

This is going to throw all the numbers off!
post #13 of 14
If it makes you feel better, when I was living with a friend there were three cats, two rats and one Sun conure in the house, and the cats were amusment for the rats and the bird. The kitten would get one thop of the rat cage and stick her paw into the cage and my rats would play with it. The kitten also use to play with the bird. She would let the bird crawl all over her to be groomed. If you've never seen a bird groom a cat, I'm sorry. It's the funnies thing ever.
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Azalie
Mousing is actually something cats have to be *taught*, it's not a hard-wired instinct. So if your cat wasn't taught to hunt by its mother as a kitten, it probably doesn't really have any idea they should be thought of as food.

I've found that hunting birds seems to be the hard-wired instinct. Not only do cats enjoy going after bugs (esp those which fly), but I got one of those stuffed toys that you find in gift stores that make real bird calls when you squeeze them. The first time I used one at home, my cat came TEARING to find the bird. He always manages to pull them down, play with them, and hide them on me.

He probably wouldn't know what to do with a real mouse if he saw one, though, bless him.
I've heard this before but it doesnt explain my kitty Jupiter.

His mother Maverick is a rubbish hunter yet he brings home mice, birds etc when he's allowed out
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