TheCatSite.com › Forums › Our Feline Companions › Cat Health › Why I Hate Vets!~
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Why I Hate Vets!~

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
Thank you to everyone who has responded to me and my questions about my remaining kitty Wizard after the loss of his wonderful step-brother Demon on Sunday morning.

Since Demon's passing, Wizard had't pooped until just a little while ago and I was concerned. People responded with ideas and hep and I thank you! However, many mentioned taking him to the vets.

As for seeing my vet, I don't have a regular vet since I moved here (Southeast New Hampshire) a few years ago. My cats have been incredibly healthy and are house cats. I lost a good job a while back and have been changing my lifestyle and trying to get myself out of debt since. Then, not long ago, I was injured at my current work and have had a couple surgeries myself. So, being out of work, fighting with workman's comp, I'm behind on a few things and basically broke until my "adjusted" checks get here.

This is what broke my heart! When I lived out west, 99% of the time, paying the Vet was no problem, but when/if it was, I was always asked, "If you can't afford it, we can set up a payment plan."

Here, I called 11 Vets, even one that advertised in big bold letters, "The Needs of Your Pet ALWAYS Come First." I told them, I think my cat is dieing... he has a sore in his mouth and he's aweful week and I don't know how much, if anything, he's been eating (since I have another cat that shares the food). I told them, I don't think he'll make it through the weekend unless we can get some food or fluids into him. I said, I get a check on Monday and can pay whatever you want, you can varify it through my work. I was told, I'm really sorry and sorry for your cat, but without payment in full up front, we can't see him."

So, I HATE the money hungry Vets in this area that would rather my kitty starve to death than to let me pay them within 48 hrs - even if it meant holding the cat and charging me a late fee! They would rather it die than have the 1% Possibility of not getting their $38 to $60 up front!

So, even though all the vets in this area send pets to the same place to be cremated, I drove to a different state to drop off Demon to be cremated and returned to me rather than giving a vet within 50 miles of my house a dime of my money.

Sorry for the novel, but whenever someone mentions vets now, I tend to spout off because I feel they deliberately killed my cat because they refused to see him or give him treatment.

If there is anyone in the Southeast New Hampshire are that knows a good vet that is great with cats and more concerned about saving a kitty in an emergency situation that making sure I can pay in advance, please let me know! I would greatly appreciate it.

Thanks for listening.

Bob D
Epping, NH
post #2 of 29
I'm so sorry you're going through this, Bob, and have had such a difficult experience with the Vets in your area. How frustrating to not be able to get your little one the help he needed. Losing Demon has been so very painful for you and Wizard. You must feel absolutely devastated.
post #3 of 29
I am so sorry to hear what happened. I have been in similar situations and know how frurstrating and scary it can be, and how horrible the feeling of helplessness is.

One thing I could suggest that helped me in the past was contacting local animal welfare and rescue groups. They may know someone, or be willing to help in some way.
post #4 of 29
Bob, I am soo sorry to hear of the passing of Demon. Those kind of vets really get to me too. I'm sure there is a loving and compassionate vet in your area, who is actually in practice for the animals welfare and not his/her pocketbook. I'm glad Wizard finally, you know There are a lot of members her from the New England area, I'm sure they can reccomend a great vet good luck, many hugs to you and Wizard.
post #5 of 29
I don't know exactly where you are so this might be a bit of a drive but I used to go to a great vet in south Concord called Cilley's. Of course I don't know if they do payments or not . I'm really surprised no one would work with you. When I had an emergency with one of my cats they needed the lab money up front because they had to pay that much but the rest they let me pay later (down here though). That is to bad no one was willing to work with you .
post #6 of 29
how frustrating and I cna understand, had a problem with a very sick kitten and no one would see him because they needed money up front, it was wednesday and i get paid fridays, no one would hold a check, (and one place did ONLY if you were there previously, which I never was.) the kitten died, (although I think he would have died anyways but still, I wanted to give every chance possible.) there was alot going on at the moment where my husband and i got short on money and stuff.
post #7 of 29
That is so sad. Over here, it's quite the opposite. My vet would often treat animals for free. It's only when someone repeatatively fails to pay that they might refuse treatment. Even then, they refer him to the local animal shelter and advise on giving them the pet, rather than prevent medical attention. And as I said, they would never refuse treatment if you tell them you were to pay in a few days. Actually, come to think of it, they don't charge anything until after the treatment.

I hope you can find a vet you can work with Bob. I think asking at animal shetlers is a good idea. Let us know how it goes. It is important to take the time now and find a vet you feel comfortable with, just in case...
post #8 of 29
I'm so sorry for you baby. That's awful. Hopefully you were dealing with someone working reception and not the actual vet? If I were you, I would find out the vets's home addresses and write them a letter detailing exactly what happened, from the beginning of Demon's illness through calling their office and being told to screw off and then to having him put to rest far away. If nothing else it will help you gain closure, and at best will help vets train their staff (or themselves!) to care about the animals first and the pay second, if they know you can pay in the near future!
post #9 of 29
The vets in my area will not take payments unless you have been going to then either. I receintly had to take a cat to emergency 'cause a scrape with a dog put her in a coma. I learned about Care Credit. IT IS WONDERFULL. The bill was over $600.00. They payed the vet, I pay them $12.00 a month! There is no interest if you pay it off within a certain amount of time too. I tell you, if I can get it, ANYONE can! They send you a credit card with a limit on it (I have a $1,000.00 limit), you can use it for any kind of health stuff and if where you go does not take it, they say to let them know and they will talk to them about it.

www.carecredit.com
post #10 of 29
I would like to give my opinion on a few things from the other side (as someone who works as a receptionist at a veterinary clinic). First, Bob stated that he "hadn't had his cats to a vet since he moved a few years ago". Every pet should have an exam at least once a year (twice a year for seniors). Pets can look healthy on the outside but have underlying medical conditions that only a vet can find (from examining the pet and/or running blood work and other tests). So many people never take their pets to the vet for anything unless it's an emergency. There also is a rabies vaccine law in nearly every state (even for indoor only cats). Second, if a receptionist tells you that a clinic does not take payments you can be sure it's because she was instructed to do so by the Veterinarian. At the clinic that I work at (and several others in our area) even though we do not take payments from new clients we will take them from established clients if it's for an unplanned emergency visit. We do, however, hold checks until Fridays (because most people get paid of Fridays). It's just not something we advertise. If someone's dog/cat gets hit by a car and it's a long standing Client their pet will be treated as long as payment arrangements are agreed on ahead of time. Does our clinic treat a pet that we've never seen in this case? No, we tell them to go elsewhere. It takes a lot of money to keep a clinic running: vets, techs and receptionists salaries, mortgage, utilities, medical supplies (a huge expense). If the clinic doesn't get paid the employees can't be paid. How many people here would be willing to work every day for free? I know I can't afford to. I think it's irresponsible to own pets if you don't have some type of a plan in place if one of them gets sick or has an emergency. Blaming the vet for not trusting someone he's never met to make payments is absurd. When our clinic first opened they did take payments. According to the business manager they spent so much time at the local magistrates office trying to collect on bad accounts that it was taking time away from treating patients. The clinic is in business to treat sick/injured animals not spend time collecting on overdue accounts. I'm sorry if I sound harsh, but I have to deal with people every day who think that our clinic is just horrible not to accept payments from total strangers. I'm betting if you got yourself established at a clinic that they would be willing to work with you if one of your animals needed treatment and you couldn't afford it at the moment.
post #11 of 29
Quote:
Blaming the vet for not trusting someone he's never met to make payments is absurd.
Totally agree.

And lest someone counter with "but don't they love animals?" etc., I remind you that veterinary medicine is a business like any other and as such has basic requirements. In what other business setting could you appear out of nowhere and ask for delayed payments for services or goods?

Try taking starving children into a grocery store and asking for food with no money and only a promise to pay next week.

Try wearing tattered clothing into any K-Mart and asking for clothing with no money.

Try calling a heating oil company in the dead of winter as your family is freezing and ask them to deliver oil without payment.

And these are basic human needs- a pet is a voluntary assumption of responsibility.

I could go on for pages about what I believe to be the responsibilities inherent in accepting an animal into your home, but provisions for necessary medical care would be right up there with quality food.
I am not saying that you need to have loads of money under your mattress- only that things like this should be considered and dealt with before an emergency occurrs.

luvmy4cats makes an excellent point- If you have a regular vet who sees your animals at least annually then in all likelihood you will have zero problems getting care for them when that emergency happens. It is primarily those folks with no regular veterinarian who run into problems when they turn up on a doorstep with a sick animal and no money.

It is sad that the pet in question died- I am not trivializing the loss of a pet. But to blame veterinarians while at the same time saying "As for seeing my vet, I don't have a regular vet since I moved here (Southeast New Hampshire) a few years ago" is IMO placing blame incorrectly.

I do of course realize that this sounds harsh and I fully expect to get slammed because of my opinion.
But pet ownership is 100% voluntary. If you cannot afford to care for a pet fully, then perhaps the time is not right for you to own one.

If you already have assumed responsibility for a pet and have no money then I would suggest that you closely examine where your money goes. Coffee every morning? CD's every week? Song downloads? Put that money aside- it adds up remarkably fast. Even $5 a week is over $500 after two years, and I know of no veterinarians who would not accept this as a down payment.

It is all about foresight and accepting the responsibilities of pet ownership.
post #12 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cearbhaill
Totally agree.

And lest someone counter with "but don't they love animals?" etc., I remind you that veterinary medicine is a business like any other and as such has basic requirements. In what other business setting could you appear out of nowhere and ask for delayed payments for services or goods?

Try taking starving children into a grocery store and asking for food with no money and only a promise to pay next week.

Try wearing tattered clothing into any K-Mart and asking for clothing with no money.

Try calling a heating oil company in the dead of winter as your family is freezing and ask them to deliver oil without payment.

And these are basic human needs- a pet is a voluntary assumption of responsibility.

I could go on for pages about what I believe to be the responsibilities inherent in accepting an animal into your home, but provisions for necessary medical care would be right up there with quality food.
I am not saying that you need to have loads of money under your mattress- only that things like this should be considered and dealt with before an emergency occurrs.

luvmy4cats makes an excellent point- If you have a regular vet who sees your animals at least annually then in all likelihood you will have zero problems getting care for them when that emergency happens. It is primarily those folks with no regular veterinarian who run into problems when they turn up on a doorstep with a sick animal and no money.

It is sad that the pet in question died- I am not trivializing the loss of a pet. But to blame veterinarians while at the same time saying "As for seeing my vet, I don't have a regular vet since I moved here (Southeast New Hampshire) a few years ago" is IMO placing blame incorrectly.

I do of course realize that this sounds harsh and I fully expect to get slammed because of my opinion.
But pet ownership is 100% voluntary. If you cannot afford to care for a pet fully, then perhaps the time is not right for you to own one.

If you already have assumed responsibility for a pet and have no money then I would suggest that you closely examine where your money goes. Coffee every morning? CD's every week? Song downloads? Put that money aside- it adds up remarkably fast. Even $5 a week is over $500 after two years, and I know of no veterinarians who would not accept this as a down payment.

It is all about foresight and accepting the responsibilities of pet ownership.
I just have to add here that I fully agree. It's terrible that the kitty died, but as much as I love animals, I could not afford to pay for my education, rent/mortgage on a vet clinic, staff, medications and insurance and give free service to any stranger walking in off the street. I'd soon be out of business and unable to treat anybody's animal.

Your examples about grocery stores, etc. are perfect comparisons. Why should we expect vets to work for free and give free service and no other professional? Doesn't seem right to me.

I'd love to have a horse - I don't because I couldn't afford the boarding, food, ferrier fees, vet fees, etc. It's all about responsibility, yes.
post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cearbhaill
Totally agree.

And lest someone counter with "but don't they love animals?" etc., I remind you that veterinary medicine is a business like any other and as such has basic requirements. In what other business setting could you appear out of nowhere and ask for delayed payments for services or goods?

Try taking starving children into a grocery store and asking for food with no money and only a promise to pay next week.

Try wearing tattered clothing into any K-Mart and asking for clothing with no money.

Try calling a heating oil company in the dead of winter as your family is freezing and ask them to deliver oil without payment.

And these are basic human needs- a pet is a voluntary assumption of responsibility.

I could go on for pages about what I believe to be the responsibilities inherent in accepting an animal into your home, but provisions for necessary medical care would be right up there with quality food.
I am not saying that you need to have loads of money under your mattress- only that things like this should be considered and dealt with before an emergency occurrs.

luvmy4cats makes an excellent point- If you have a regular vet who sees your animals at least annually then in all likelihood you will have zero problems getting care for them when that emergency happens. It is primarily those folks with no regular veterinarian who run into problems when they turn up on a doorstep with a sick animal and no money.

It is sad that the pet in question died- I am not trivializing the loss of a pet. But to blame veterinarians while at the same time saying "As for seeing my vet, I don't have a regular vet since I moved here (Southeast New Hampshire) a few years ago" is IMO placing blame incorrectly.

I do of course realize that this sounds harsh and I fully expect to get slammed because of my opinion.
But pet ownership is 100% voluntary. If you cannot afford to care for a pet fully, then perhaps the time is not right for you to own one.

If you already have assumed responsibility for a pet and have no money then I would suggest that you closely examine where your money goes. Coffee every morning? CD's every week? Song downloads? Put that money aside- it adds up remarkably fast. Even $5 a week is over $500 after two years, and I know of no veterinarians who would not accept this as a down payment.

It is all about foresight and accepting the responsibilities of pet ownership.

I must say that while I'm sad that the cat is sick, I agree with you and lovemy4cats as well. I don't see how the vet is at fault when the OP didn't take them for checkups for years or build any form of relationship with one of the local vets.

HE might actually intend to pay a vet bill in installments, but it's so common for people to say "I'll pay later" and skip out on the payment/ give a fake address and telephone# that it's just not practical to give strangers payment plans anymore.

It sucks, but it's the fault of dishonest people who scam vets for free care, not the vet's fault.
post #14 of 29
I also agree with the others above about not blaming the vet. My vet happens to be an old friend of mine so I hear a lot of behind the scenes type of stuff. MANY people come into the animal hospital with no money and a sick animal. She says that she feels very bad but the clinic just can't function if they are doing free cases. There are a lot of people who say they will pay and then don't. It costs even more money to go after those people. The do however let people pay later when they are previous clients.

My friend (the vet) got an emergency a few months ago: a kitten had fallen two stories and had broken its hip and front leg. The owner couldn't pay. For some reason, my friend decided that she just couldn't put this poor cat down so she gave the option of signing the cat over the vet. They operated on the cat a couple of times and saved its life. Now my friend has a very cute, but additional, cat at home with her other animals. They can't do that for every case.

I totally understand how hard financial stuff is. I'm a student and have spent over $1500 on my cats in the last year. They have had a rough year health wise. I'm in debt now and eat a lot of beans and potatoes! But I don't believe it is my vets responsibility to pay for my pets. My only advice is to develop a relationship with a vet and they will be a lot more understanding.
post #15 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by tourmaline
I also agree with the others above about not blaming the vet. My vet happens to be an old friend of mine so I hear a lot of behind the scenes type of stuff. MANY people come into the animal hospital with no money and a sick animal. She says that she feels very bad but the clinic just can't function if they are doing free cases. There are a lot of people who say they will pay and then don't. It costs even more money to go after those people. The do however let people pay later when they are previous clients.

My friend (the vet) got an emergency a few months ago: a kitten had fallen two stories and had broken its hip and front leg. The owner couldn't pay. For some reason, my friend decided that she just couldn't put this poor cat down so she gave the option of signing the cat over the vet. They operated on the cat a couple of times and saved its life. Now my friend has a very cute, but additional, cat at home with her other animals. They can't do that for every case.

I totally understand how hard financial stuff is. I'm a student and have spent over $1500 on my cats in the last year. They have had a rough year health wise. I'm in debt now and eat a lot of beans and potatoes! But I don't believe it is my vets responsibility to pay for my pets. My only advice is to develop a relationship with a vet and they will be a lot more understanding.
I just wanted to say I love your kitties. They are so beautiful.
post #16 of 29
I dont want to make this into a novella, but , I worked in the medical field for 30 years. (Surgical tech with a marketing degree turned Medical Adminstrator) When I started the whole point was treatment of patients and their care came first. By the time i left the hospitals, *now for profit* everything had changed. The HMO's and insurance companies decided what type of treatment could be given to a patient. The doctors who worried about law suits over ordered tests and gave unnecessary antibiotics, creating super bugs. The outbreak of MRSA in virtually every state is a direct result of this.
The cost and treatment of a pet isnt any different. I believe that having a pet is a responsibility, just like having children. BUT, you can't anticipate problems like unemployment or other financial losses. The answer isnt giving up your pet any more than giving up a child.
The real trick is finding a doctor for yourself or your pet that still has the idea that they began in the field to treat the sick...not become millionaires.
I understand firsthand the cost it takes to run a medical center, however, I also have never seen a doctor worried about his next meal or buying new clothes. It takes very little to treat a patient for simple problems. Not much other than a few minutes of their time. A few minutes off the golf course? An hour away from a trip to the Bahamas?
I am not bitter. I find it sad that this is where we are in health care. I know there are a few good men and women still out there...the trick is finding them.
Thanks for listening
post #17 of 29
WHile I don't think the vet necessarily WRONG for refusing to treat someone who couldn't pay up front, I DO think that there should be a referral system for rescue groups or animal care funds or Doctors With a Heart-type programs for people who can't say, so the vet can say "Ok, well, I can't give you services because you're broke and not an established client, but here are people who can give you what you are looking for". These programs are surprisingly widespread and accessible and easy to get involved with. I don't think anyone who is in the business of animal health and welfare has ANY business completely brushing an animal off that needs care. These programs exist for a very good reason, and it's to help people who have fallen upon financial hard times. I think it's partly the responsibility of the vets to refer people to these programs rather than just outright refusing care.
post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by reddicequeen
I dont want to make this into a novella, but , I worked in the medical field for 30 years. (Surgical tech with a marketing degree turned Medical Adminstrator) When I started the whole point was treatment of patients and their care came first. By the time i left the hospitals, *now for profit* everything had changed. The HMO's and insurance companies decided what type of treatment could be given to a patient. The doctors who worried about law suits over ordered tests and gave unnecessary antibiotics, creating super bugs. The outbreak of MRSA in virtually every state is a direct result of this.
The cost and treatment of a pet isnt any different. I believe that having a pet is a responsibility, just like having children. BUT, you can't anticipate problems like unemployment or other financial losses. The answer isnt giving up your pet any more than giving up a child.
The real trick is finding a doctor for yourself or your pet that still has the idea that they began in the field to treat the sick...not become millionaires.
I understand firsthand the cost it takes to run a medical center, however, I also have never seen a doctor worried about his next meal or buying new clothes. It takes very little to treat a patient for simple problems. Not much other than a few minutes of their time. A few minutes off the golf course? An hour away from a trip to the Bahamas?
I am not bitter. I find it sad that this is where we are in health care. I know there are a few good men and women still out there...the trick is finding them.
Thanks for listening

You can't anticipate unemployment, etc., but this is not the case here. A vet you've established a relationship and trust with (and he had "years" to do so) would have no problem working out a payment plan with you, and so many have been burned numerous times by people rushing a pet in, having all of the surgery done, then saying "Oh, btw, I have no money. Does this cost anything?" , then providing a false address/phone number or simply being given wrong info by strangers after offering payment plans that they've become wary.

It does not matter that they are not starving (btw, it's fairly rare for a vet to become a millionaire, although there ARE price gougers out there). It matters that they would be very naive to trust every single stranger, and most likely end up going out of business if they did. A relationship built during good times will do wonders to help during rough ones. Most vets are not "trying to become millionaires". They're trying to not get ripped off by scam artists.

You most likely are not starving. Would you do your job for free for two people? What happens when those two tell friends and thirty show up whining that "you did it for him...why not me?" and turn hostile?

If you have a preexisting relationship with one or more vets in the past, most would have no problem putting a good word in for you, and their actual existence can be verified.

There are things like www.carecredit.com which will help with vet bills and general medical bills.
post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by lionessrampant
WHile I don't think the vet necessarily WRONG for refusing to treat someone who couldn't pay up front, I DO think that there should be a referral system for rescue groups or animal care funds or Doctors With a Heart-type programs for people who can't say, so the vet can say "Ok, well, I can't give you services because you're broke and not an established client, but here are people who can give you what you are looking for". These programs are surprisingly widespread and accessible and easy to get involved with. I don't think anyone who is in the business of animal health and welfare has ANY business completely brushing an animal off that needs care. These programs exist for a very good reason, and it's to help people who have fallen upon financial hard times. I think it's partly the responsibility of the vets to refer people to these programs rather than just outright refusing care.

A referral service is an excellent idea. On a side note, I wonder if OP called any rescues/shelters besides the 11 vets...they could point him in the direction of low-cost clinics in his area, if they don't have them themselves.
post #20 of 29
I would never expect a vet to treat my cat for free, but I would expect them to try to work with me. Then again, I like to think that everyone is good, and most vets probably start off thinking they'll help everyone and then they get screwed too many times and realize they can't.
I don't know. This is the exact reason I got a credit card, so that if I were short on cash and she got sick, I could still take her to the vet.
Please keep in mind that Bob just lost two cats, and blame is a well-established part of the grieving process.
post #21 of 29
I have care credit , it has been a life saver in regards to dental work....I have saw a few vet s in the area including the er vet clinic take it .... I have always work with my vet most of the time I can pay but for the time s I cant I tell them on the phone and get something worked out before hand
post #22 of 29
First, Bob, I am so very sorry for your loss. I know how much you're grieving, having lost 2 kitties myself in the past 6 months. Luckily, I'm an established customer and my vet had no problem with a pay-plan.

That being said, may I offer 2 bits of advice? You still have Wizard, and the day will come when he needs a vet. I would take him in for a "well-kitty" check-up, so that you can become acquainted with a vet in your area. At least in the future they would recognize you as someone who has an account with them, and would probably be more willing to work with you.
I would also get a credit-card for use in emergencies. I'm not advocating the use of a cc, but it can certainly make a difference in a critical situation.

I know you're angry right now, and I don't blame you a bit. Please, if nothing else, find a vet for future use.
post #23 of 29
Bob, I'm so sorry for your loss, and I can't blame you for being angry. Sometimes your life is going great, you have a decent job and decent pay, and then all of a sudden something unforseen happens, like an injury, and you lose almost everything. I had something happen to me, I was between jobs and moving back to another state, when my cat became very ill. Turns out she had a severe liver infection and that first time I owed over $1000 in vet bills. I had to use the credit card. I got a job shortly after and thought everything would be okay for a while but less than a year later she got another liver infection, (new vet said she was born prone to these infections, along with an enlarged heart and breathing problems). Almost $1000 in vet bills again. This time I got Care Credit, which has a promotional offer that if you pay the amount in 6months, you don't have to pay the finance charges. However, (and someone correct me if I'm wrong) if you don't pay this balance off in 6 months you have to pay the finance charges also, and pay almost 23% in finance charges for future payments.

I am now waiting for her next infection, and anticipate another $1,000 vet bill. I'm watching every penny, don't have the latest gadgets that everyone else has, don't go to movies, etc, and even though I'd love to have another cat, I know I just can't afford it right now. My vet knows me (I think he's great, takes time with her, and takes the time to explain everything to me)and I have no doubt that he would let me pay off in installments should she have another emergency. But I do understand that a vet can't let anyone that he or she doesn't know pay later, I'm sure they've been stiffed plenty of times, and it takes alot of money to run a vet clinic. New medical equipments alone costs a fortune, not to mention the staff's salaries, etc.

I hope that you recover soon and that Wizard (he's grieving too) will remain healthy for a very long time, but you should develop a relationship with a good vet, as the other posters suggested. Cats need to be seen at least once a year, as they hide illnesses very well. Good Luck!
post #24 of 29
I do want to note that not EVERY vet will work with you even if your well established. Private vets i am sure are better than the big time vets.

I used to go to Banfield. My local branch was very great with wonderfull vets. I paid about $200 a month for all my kitties to have insurance through them ect..

and than I had an ER...$1000 was the expected bill for TESTS only...not includeing treatment. I always paid upfront, brought my kitties in for well over 2 years...

they flat out said. Nope no way no how.
post #25 of 29
...but since this is not a perfect world...one would think that there would be some alternatives. Some truly poor people are able to get on medicaid and have fairly good health coverage. There isnt anything like that for your pet if you are unemployed.
I am not unemployed, I can afford to pay for my pet care but I truly sympathize with those who are on tight budgets.
I also know that sometimes doctors do get burned by patients who do not pay for whatever reason. If you are in that field you know it is annoying, however, it doesnt mean the clinic will close or that anyone will be out of work. Its more an occasional thing then a regular practice. Mostly because they usually dont get through the door to be seen without the money. The established patients....who dont have the money...usually don't stiff the doctor.
I think that it should be part of a doctors rotation in the residents program to volunteer X amount of hours in free care to those who cannot pay for it. I am talking both vets and m.d.'s , d.o.'s etc. They could make it part of their training. The suggestion didnt fly when i was working and probably won't now. There are so many good people around that volunteer their time for resuce work. Perhaps its something to think about for a time. Perhaps you are in a position to make the suggestion?
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by CommonOddity042

It sucks, but it's the fault of dishonest people who scam vets for free care, not the vet's fault.
I agree, it is really the fault of dishonest people who take an animal to a vet, and say they will pay later...then decide $100 or $1000 or whatever is too much, and refuse to pay. And saying keep the animal until paid...too many people would give up the pet rather than pay, and then the vet is stuck with the bill AND a recovering pet!

My heart breaks for you, Bob. I am not in your shoes, but my husband did just lose his job. Last year we spent a LOT of money on the vet for our horses. We almost lost one horse, and she was under the vets care for about a month. And I just spent over $300 on surgery for my dog. Although we have a credit card, if something catastophic comes up, we may not be able to easily afford the optimal vet care!

Also, while annual check-ups and vaccines are recommended, many people don't believe in annual vaccines, so put off the vet visits. Maybe it isn't the best choice, but it happens sometimes. Especially when money is tight.

Do check with the shelters and rescues. My vet does spays and neuters of ferals, including shots, for $25 per cat. That is his way of giving back to the community. Other vets work at spay and neuter days, where they are on their feet for hours, doing one surgery after another. They are compensated, but I'm sure it isn't enough to be worth giving up 8 hours on a Sunday once a month! I have another vet near me who does low cost spays and neuters to anyone within 10 miles of him. He is basically a vet for racehorses, but takes time in the mornings to do some surgeries, to help out. I'm sure he makes a little profit, but not much. There are good vets out there. You may not have found them yet...but they do exist. And you will need a vet at some point for your other kitty. Better to find him/her now!

A final suggestion...difficult if you are already struggling financially, but start that savings plan. My 22 y/o daughter has never been able to save a dime in her life! However, when I threatened to take her kitten if she didn't get it neutered by 6 months, she managed to save the money. (In fact, she saved enough to cover some medical bills of her own, too! Had to borrow from the kitty fund for a week until she got paid...but she paid it right back! LOL!)

Again, condolences on your loss.
post #27 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by reddicequeen
...but since this is not a perfect world...one would think that there would be some alternatives. Some truly poor people are able to get on medicaid and have fairly good health coverage. There isnt anything like that for your pet if you are unemployed.
I am not unemployed, I can afford to pay for my pet care but I truly sympathize with those who are on tight budgets.
I also know that sometimes doctors do get burned by patients who do not pay for whatever reason. If you are in that field you know it is annoying, however, it doesnt mean the clinic will close or that anyone will be out of work. Its more an occasional thing then a regular practice. Mostly because they usually dont get through the door to be seen without the money. The established patients....who dont have the money...usually don't stiff the doctor.
I think that it should be part of a doctors rotation in the residents program to volunteer X amount of hours in free care to those who cannot pay for it. I am talking both vets and m.d.'s , d.o.'s etc. They could make it part of their training. The suggestion didnt fly when i was working and probably won't now. There are so many good people around that volunteer their time for resuce work. Perhaps its something to think about for a time. Perhaps you are in a position to make the suggestion?

Don't misunderstand this as an attack, but even in that theoretical world, there'd still be problems. Some people would just be too lazy to take their animals in (seeing it as a waste of time), and others would not be able to get transport there.

I agree that alternatives should be available, but they should be set up in a way that makes it harder for the dishonest to be successful, while not hindering the rest of the population. Perhaps some sort of quick identity/info verification system. This may sound harsh, but there should also be some system which keeps track of the scammers as well. The actions of the few DO affect the many, and it is terrible that it happens, but that is reality. Once bitten, twice shy.

I am sorry for his losses and hope that he's found some way to get help for his cat.
post #28 of 29
i guess my thing is most vets would gladly donate the time they spend with the animal but someone has to pay for the stuff they use to treat it. the vet has to pay for the supplies. its not fair to him to have to pay for the supplies. ive worked at a animal hopsital for 8 years the vet i worked for woul always try to help even if they idnt have money either by donating or even offering the person to work it off by doing some odd jobs around the hospital. when we take in a animal its our responsibility to make sure we can care for it just like our children. that even means asking the vet before hand his rules for a emergency and if they will take payments. not just expecting it.
post #29 of 29
I have to agree with what has been said about building a relationship with your vet. When I was in England I used the same vet for 25 years and had an excellent relationship with them. I had several horses, dogs & cats they always accomodated me on payiment plans when I had annual boosters for the horses even when they changed the rules for others I was still allowed to pay monthly.

One night a few years ago I found a cat in the lane which had been hit by a car. I went to move it to the side of the road and was horrified to find it was still alive and in a dreadfull state it was 3am in the morning.

I rang my vet emergency line and Rod (the vet and by now a good friend) came down to the surgery to see the cat. Unfortunately there was nothing he could do and the cat had to be put to sleep. I offered to pay him but he refused payment, I never found out who owned the cat despite visiting several houses in the lane.

This just illustrates the importance of a relationship with your vet (the cat was not even mine) while I sympathise with you Bob for your loss and feel for you and your cat I cannot blame the vet for turning away a complete stranger. I beg you Please please think of the long term heath of your cat. Instead of comdeming all vets in general, make plans, put a little money aside get a credit card for emergencies, find out where to go in am emergency who offers a 24 hour service where the local shelters are. I would do anything for my animals I would even sell belongings to pay for their care if totally desperate I would take my animals to a local charity and beg for help (in the UK RSPCA or PDSA).

Here in Lanzarote I am still building that relationship with my vet, I have had emergency treatment with a 24 hour vet hidden in the back streets of the capital where they spoke no English and at that time I spoke no Spanish.

I made it my duty when arriving here 18 months ago to make sure I knew where to get treatment.

This week I had to take my boys with colds and one of my boarders who had had some sort of fit and then our stupid dog when it jumped in a cactus bush ...... they immediately allowed me to pay a bit at a time.... relationship established
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cat Health
TheCatSite.com › Forums › Our Feline Companions › Cat Health › Why I Hate Vets!~