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catnip protest

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
I thought this was interesting, I take my Cats to an all cats clinic where the vet is very informative and very knowledgeable. they are the best in the area, but when I mentioned Catnip, I got the whole its a drug...etc...and better not to use it. this is the only area where I have a problem and where I disagree. (I still go but don't mention Catnip) When I asked the Vet-tech why, she said because it changes the behavior in Cats so therefore it is a drug and therefore bad. I have done alot of research since then about Catnip, and found nothing negative that which I can see. It is non-addictive, can also be theaurpeutic..etc. Just wanted to know what everyones eles opinion was on this. (as curiosity has gotton ahold of me) Does anyone else see it as a health issue? does anyone else not give their cat catnip because it is a drug?

btw, my cat has bad stomach problems and Catnip actually helps him alot, especialy with his gas...Anyone with a stinky cat can know just how bad they can get...
post #2 of 22
From someone with a stinky cat who also has stomach problems, my vet recommended catnip as well as cat grass... partly to help with the gas and partly to make him more active and so help his stomach that way.

We have cat grass available all the time and they get catnip about twice a week.

And all 4 of mine get it despite the fact it was recommended for Bumper
post #3 of 22
I think the "drug" argument is ridiculous.
It doesn't harm the cat healthwise.
It doesn't cause the cat to engage in dangerous or destructive behavior like mind altering drugs can do to a person.
It isn't addictive.
It doesn't really do much at all except make the cat act a bit silly in my experience.

Cats are not people. I think people forget this sometimes.

Edited for redundancy.
post #4 of 22
Thread Starter 
I am right with ya on that one Eupnea
The effects also vary widely with all my cats...(Sum are barely affected it by it) After about 20 minutes Everyone loses interest.
post #5 of 22
I've also heard that it is good for their digestive system. They seem to have some self restraint as well. Like enigma said, they lose interest fast. The time I gave it to my kitty she seemed to just sniff at it, roll in it, lick a little bit of it, and she was good. When I first gave her some I wondered if there was such thing as overdosing on it, but they seem to know when enough was enough.
post #6 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by enigma
When I asked the Vet-tech why, she said because it changes the behavior in Cats so therefore it is a drug and therefore bad. I have done alot of research since then about Catnip, and found nothing negative that which I can see. It is non-addictive, can also be theaurpeutic..etc.
Hahahaha! Whew! Ok, now that I have control of myself....

I admit, my husband and I jokingly call catnip "kitty pot" because of it's oddly similar effect to human marijuana. Now, I have NO intention of starting any marijuana argument, quite the opposite.... My opinion are, these are CATS! They have the incredible advantage over us in that they do not need to drive, go to work or school, pay bills, etc. Therefore, if their behavior is temporarily affected by catnip, so be it! More power to 'em! It sounds like your vet means well, but at least to me, there's a certain point at which a personal conviction just steps over the line of reasonableness and practicality.

And, as has been mentioned, the possible health benefits are all the MORE reason to allow our cats to enjoy the stuff. However, the instant you see your can get behind the steering wheel, or if he threatens to throw himself from a second floor window, or if he starts screaming "the ear mites, the ear mites, they're all over! Ahhhh!", THEN you might be well-advised to lay off the catnip.
post #7 of 22
I personally find it a silly argument. The response to catnip is inherited, if a cat does not inherit the genes to respond to catnip, it won't, and related to it's age (usually will not respond until reaching sexual maturity.)

For second, catnip, a member of the mint family, has been used medicinally by humans for hundreds of years. For those cats who do not respond to catnip, many will respond to honeysuckle and/or valerian, in a similar fashion.

I just don't see anything wrong with a pinch of something or a toy stuffed with something, that they love to smell and play with, and on occasion, nibble a teense of.
post #8 of 22
LOL I also think it is a funny argument. Who cares if it doesn't hurt them. One of my cats would get it and just sit close to a chair and STARE at it! I thought it was pretty funny. If it doesn't hurt any cats and it only has beneficial purposes, then why not, they like it!
post #9 of 22
I have never heard that before. I let my kitties have catnip, it makes them happy and it doesnt hurt them so why wouldnt I? I'm sure their heart is in the right place its just kind of silly I think.
post #10 of 22
I'll stop giving Pudge catnip when she decides to live on the ceiling because the floor is trying to eat her and not a moment before.
post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by rblaude
Hahahaha! Whew! Ok, now that I have control of myself....

I admit, my husband and I jokingly call catnip "kitty pot" because of it's oddly similar effect to human marijuana. Now, I have NO intention of starting any marijuana argument, quite the opposite.... My opinion are, these are CATS! They have the incredible advantage over us in that they do not need to drive, go to work or school, pay bills, etc. Therefore, if their behavior is temporarily affected by catnip, so be it! More power to 'em! It sounds like your vet means well, but at least to me, there's a certain point at which a personal conviction just steps over the line of reasonableness and practicality.

And, as has been mentioned, the possible health benefits are all the MORE reason to allow our cats to enjoy the stuff. However, the instant you see your can get behind the steering wheel, or if he threatens to throw himself from a second floor window, or if he starts screaming "the ear mites, the ear mites, they're all over! Ahhhh!", THEN you might be well-advised to lay off the catnip.
ROTF

When i take the catnip out of the fridge, I usually call out, "okay, where's the little junkie kittens."

I've never heard anything so ridiculous, there are so many health benefits to it. It's even good for glaucoma...no wait..I'm getting confused.

At least now I know why my cats insist on my playing "Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds" while they roll in it. They've been bugging me for a lava lamp for years. I've been so blind.

LOL

Until the day I find a package of rolling papers hidden in the litterbox, I'm not going to worry about it.
post #12 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charmed654321
Until the day I find a package of rolling papers hidden in the litterbox, I'm not going to worry about it.
Yes, and when they start stealing twenties out of my purse before they go out for the night, then I'll know it's a problem.

<sigh> Let's just say, I hope I come back as a cat in my next life! (as long as my humans feed me good food and keep me inside, AND GIVE ME CATNIP!)

I wonder if the vet mentioned in the original post can hear us laughing in their general direction?
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat & Alix
I personally find it a silly argument. The response to catnip is inherited, if a cat does not inherit the genes to respond to catnip, it won't, and related to it's age (usually will not respond until reaching sexual maturity.)

For second, catnip, a member of the mint family, has been used medicinally by humans for hundreds of years. For those cats who do not respond to catnip, many will respond to honeysuckle and/or valerian, in a similar fashion.

I just don't see anything wrong with a pinch of something or a toy stuffed with something, that they love to smell and play with, and on occasion, nibble a teense of.
Java actually loves mint - as much as, or possibly better, than catnip - she loves playing with the wrappers from my mint teabags [herbal only!]
post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by rblaude
:However, the instant you see your cat get behind the steering wheel, or if he threatens to throw himself from a second floor window, or if he starts screaming "the ear mites, the ear mites, they're all over! Ahhhh!", THEN you might be well-advised to lay off the catnip.

I've never heard of a vets' practice advising against catnip. So many of them enjoy it (think chocolate for humans), its effects are temporary, and it's not illegal or fattening. So is it "immoral"? Cats have no idea of morality, so why withhold the nip?
post #15 of 22
Any time I've exposed my cat to Nip he's totally uninterested. He would much rather chase a ball around or a crumpled up piece of paper.
post #16 of 22
Rocky likes mint too. In fact, when he hears me brushing my teeth, he makes a mad dash for the sink, stands up and starts licking my lips (it's a struggle to rinse before he does that!)

Little junkies. lol
post #17 of 22
All three of mine love it (and we love watching them love it)!

My son wore his new t-shirt to school today (you've probably seen one like it):
IF YOU DON'T TALK TO YOUR CAT ABOUT CATNIP, WHO WILL?
He was wondering if he'd get sent to detention for wearing a shirt with a "drug" message, but he didn't.
post #18 of 22
My cats get catnip. It certainly does alter their behavior. I wonder if they feel "down" after the effects wear off? If I knew it made them sick like a hangover I'd have to consider eliminating the treat. They do go into a deep sleep after use.
post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailfish
My cats get catnip. It certainly does alter their behavior. I wonder if they feel "down" after the effects wear off? If I knew it made them sick like a hangover I'd have to consider eliminating the treat. They do go into a deep sleep after use.
Not that I would know (ah-hem) .... but I would guess that it's more like marijuana than alcohol, so that the cats would just feel sleepy/groggy rather than nauseous. Maybe time slows down too, but then again, what do they care?
post #20 of 22
You guys are all so funny, I can't compete!

I've always heard about the non-addictive, wearing-off-quickly merits of catnip. I grow catnip, so they can eat it whenever they want, but usually they just sniff and roll! Oh, I know about the tummy thing - mints are good for the tummy, and it's a member of the mint family. Besides it's so fun to watch them!
post #21 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emma's Friend
All three of mine love it (and we love watching them love it)!

My son wore his new t-shirt to school today (you've probably seen one like it):
IF YOU DON'T TALK TO YOUR CAT ABOUT CATNIP, WHO WILL?
He was wondering if he'd get sent to detention for wearing a shirt with a "drug" message, but he didn't.

haha, now that is a hilarious shirt, and I am amazed they didn't get him for that, so many schools are getting so strict about that kind of stuff!!

and to the remark about cats getting sleepy after catnip, none of mine do, they roll around and have fun in it, get bored, then play with each other, with their toys, etc. . . I don't observe any after effects. Has to be something that triggers the "Happy" area of the brain, but only lasts for so long.
post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emma's Friend
My son wore his new t-shirt to school today (you've probably seen one like it): IF YOU DON'T TALK TO YOUR CAT ABOUT CATNIP, WHO WILL?
i have that on a bumper sticker on my car!
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