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Two Prego Cats

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Hi! I am new to this site. I need some advice! I currently have three cats- one of whom I purchased from a breeder....and two others who I have rescued from a friend b/c she was not taking proper care of them and they are BOTH pregnant!!! They are getting along fine with my original kitty, and I have sufficiently fed them, and I have also made two birthing boxes available to them with towels and newspapers for comfort. Is there anything that I can do to make these mothers more comfortable. They don't understand that the boxes are for them yet.....is there anyway to guide them in knowing? Thanks for the help! All advice is needed!
post #2 of 16
That is good that you made separate boxes for them. I always go and sit down next to the nesting area, and bring their favorite food or treat, and I have them go into it daily, just to get their own scent inside of it. Usually a few days before delivery, my queens have just automatically known that is was the right spot to nest and deliver in.
Put the nesting area in a private area, away from any other pets, not close to any windows or door, to prevent a draft.
Depending on how close the 2 pregnant girls are, they may decide to move their kittens in with one another to raise their litters together, if there is a age gap in the births, that probably wouldn't be a good idea.
The Mom's will want close access to the litter box, food, and water. They don't leave their babies very far for the first few days.
Most of our Momma's like dim lighting while they are in labor and delivery as well.
I usually try and get everything that I may need over near the birthing box, so that it is there when the time comes.
Good luck, and it is wonderful that you took in these 2 pregnant girls, and are willing to take the proper care of them. After they are done weaning, they can become spayed.
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
I put the two boxes far away from each other....I wonder if they will get the hint. Hopefully everything goes as planned! Do you think once they have the litters that my original cat will hurt the babies? Should I separate her, or should i let her get used to them?
post #4 of 16
When the kittens are born, it is best to keep all other animals away. You can begin introducing your other pets to the kittens when they turn between 7-8 weeks old and have been given their first vaccinations.
Even when cats get along well, with each other, a queen with kittens, will become very protective, and most likely will not want any animal visitors for the first few weeks.
Spend individual time with each each pregnant Mom, and introduce them to their box. I put our nesting box right next to our bed. It is covered on all sides, and gives her a small area to be able to go in and out as she wishes. I spend a few minutes daily feeding her in her box, as well as giving her love and petting her. Around the last 24-48 hours prior to delivery, the Mom's are comfortable with going in there, but don't allow any other cats of dogs in or around their box, or they may decide it isn't as safe, and decide to have their babies somewhere else.
Do you know how far along they are? Are you feeling movement yet?
post #5 of 16
Here is a link that gives help with the stages of pregnancy.
http://www.purrinlot.com/preg.htm
Another link that helps with the kittens from birth through the first 12 weeks of life.
http://www.purrinlot.com/kittenbirthcalendar.htm
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the sites...I have no idea how far along they are, I'm guessing around about 1.5-2 months considering one of the moms is pretty huge! Is it ok to pick up the cats? And I don't exactly know how to separate the three cats bc. I live in an apartment, so I don't have a lot of space to give each cat. Is there anyway that my original cat can be a part of the families??
post #7 of 16
The best thing you can do, IMO, is put their nesting boxes in a room that does not get alot of traffic, with a door that can be closed, like a bedroom. And then, as the time nears...confine the pregnant cats to that room at all times. It would be optimal if you could have 2 separate bedrooms to confine the mother cats and their litters, just in case they are more comfortable rearing their litters totally separately. But, I imagine that might not be possible in your circumstance.

Your other cat is going to be very, very curious when the kittens are born, but don't be tempted to introduce the cat to the 'new family members' (even for just a few minutes) because even though your original cat is probably very friendly and the mother cats are too, they will be VERY protective and your cat will cause them unnecessary stress. They will lash out and it can get really ugly, really quickly. I cannot stress enough that you would be better off not allowing your other cat in the room where your mother cats are raising their kittens.

Also, remember that even though you have designated nesting boxes, often they mother cats have a different idea of 'safe' and will find another place in the room that they think is more suitable (like under the bed, in dresser drawers, behind furniture). Make sure to give multiple nesting choices and block off any areas you absolutely do not want them to call home for a few months. Like under the bed, if you don't want them to nest there.

Mothers use instinct to determine the most safe area to birth and raise their kittens. Many cats prefer a nest that is covered, like a dark cave, where they can see danger coming from the entrance...but gives the feeling that they cannot be approached from all sides. You can partially cover their nesting boxes with a blanket to create an atmosphere like that.

I found that giving our mother cat access to our bedroom closet, witht he door partially open, was a good choice. I just removed everything from the floor and put down blankets and sheets for her. It was secluded and dark, yet she could see out and enter and exit easily.

you may also find that when one delivers, she may become aggressive towards the other and you may be forced to separate them. If that happens, you can get a large dog crate for the first litter so that they can share a room without fighting. Others have mentioned using them, maybe someone with experience will chime in with their ideas?

I wish you luck with your impending litters, you must have a huge heart to be taking on this responsibility. Bless you!
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by poohandwendy
The best thing you can do, IMO, is put their nesting boxes in a room that does not get alot of traffic, with a door that can be closed, like a bedroom. And then, as the time nears...confine the pregnant cats to that room at all times. It would be optimal if you could have 2 separate bedrooms to confine the mother cats and their litters, just in case they are more comfortable rearing their litters totally separately. But, I imagine that might not be possible in your circumstance.

Your other cat is going to be very, very curious when the kittens are born, but don't be tempted to introduce the cat to the 'new family members' (even for just a few minutes) because even though your original cat is probably very friendly and the mother cats are too, they will be VERY protective and your cat will cause them unnecessary stress. They will lash out and it can get really ugly, really quickly. I cannot stress enough that you would be better off not allowing your other cat in the room where your mother cats are raising their kittens.

Also, remember that even though you have designated nesting boxes, often they mother cats have a different idea of 'safe' and will find another place in the room that they think is more suitable (like under the bed, in dresser drawers, behind furniture). Make sure to give multiple nesting choices and block off any areas you absolutely do not want them to call home for a few months. Like under the bed, if you don't want them to nest there.

Mothers use instinct to determine the most safe area to birth and raise their kittens. Many cats prefer a nest that is covered, like a dark cave, where they can see danger coming from the entrance...but gives the feeling that they cannot be approached from all sides. You can partially cover their nesting boxes with a blanket to create an atmosphere like that.

I found that giving our mother cat access to our bedroom closet, witht he door partially open, was a good choice. I just removed everything from the floor and put down blankets and sheets for her. It was secluded and dark, yet she could see out and enter and exit easily.

you may also find that when one delivers, she may become aggressive towards the other and you may be forced to separate them. If that happens, you can get a large dog crate for the first litter so that they can share a room without fighting. Others have mentioned using them, maybe someone with experience will chime in with their ideas?

I wish you luck with your impending litters, you must have a huge heart to be taking on this responsibility. Bless you!


I use something called a zippy cage for the first few weeks, it is covered on all sides, except the front, but then I also cover a blanket over the front. The Mom has access to food water and litter, just a little bit out of her nesting area. We keep the Mom and babies in our bedroom, with the door closed to keep it secluded for the Mom. We don't allow any cats around during the first several weeks. Not only will the mother most likely take any other animal as a threat and will defend her kittens, but also because the babies only immunity is from Mom.
When the kittens have their first set of vaccinations, we then begin introducing the kittens to the rest of the cats in the household, for the other cats to begin teaching social skills.
When the kitten start becoming more mobile, they are moved into our kitten room, (a closet, would work great) where they have room to run, play, have access to a few different acceptable scratching surfaces, and plenty of cat toys to play with.
I can't wait to hear all about the babies!! Good luck!!
post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks so much for all the replies...I will definitely take all the advice seriously. And I will also keep you guys updated! Thanks again!
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by threescompany
Thanks so much for all the replies...I will definitely take all the advice seriously. And I will also keep you guys updated! Thanks again!
Also...given that you have 2 females that will need to be spayed once the kittens are weaned..if you need a list of low cost spay/neuter clinics in your state, just let us know and we can look them up for you.

Katie
post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
No action yet.....The cats are both increasing in size exponentially each day. I tried to squeeze the biggest one's (Joni) nipple to see if i could get any milk,,, i think a little bit might have come out.,.but it's hard to tell Sometimes I can feel the babies inside the Joni....I"m pretty sure she's farther along than Jezzi...I'll keep you all updated !!! Thanks for everything!
post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 
Still nothing! I'm anxiously awaiting the arrival of these little guys!
post #13 of 16
I would also recommend keeping them apart. you never know when one mother might take the other as a threat to her kittens, and start world war three.

As far as the boxes go, the advice I was given was that you can make the most perfect boxes in the world, you can make them Kitty Taj Mahals for all it matters, they may use it, or they may decide to have their kittens on your pillow. (At which time you can remove them to their boxes once she's done and cleaned them all up.) Basically, they will have them where then darned well please. lol

Mine decided to have them on my sofa. I just slipped a towel under her when I realized she was not going anywhere else, and stayed close by in case she needed me. However, once she was done, I put the kittens into the box, and put that in a safe, out of the way protected area,. and luckily she was fine with that and there they stayed until they were ready to leave to a bigger setup in the corner of the room.
post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 
Both mom's had their litters....Joni had 4 kittens two days before Jezzi whom had 4 right next to Joni....Their litters are kinda mixed,,,they are mother and daughter so they are very close and trust one another! I hope that they don't confuse their babies! haha. Thanks for all the previous advice
post #15 of 16
Congrats on two smooth deliveries. I could not possibly imagine the stress of having two cats be pregnant at the same time...
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by threescompany
Both mom's had their litters....Joni had 4 kittens two days before Jezzi whom had 4 right next to Joni....Their litters are kinda mixed,,,they are mother and daughter so they are very close and trust one another! I hope that they don't confuse their babies! haha. Thanks for all the previous advice
Glad it was all ok...if you need a list of low cost clinics when it is time to get both moms fixed....let me know.

Katie
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