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Milosevic is dead

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/4796470.stm
It seems far too gentle a fate for the instigator of "ethnic cleansing". Many of the family members of his victims must feel cheated.
post #2 of 19
So long sucker.
post #3 of 19
I certainly can't say that I feel any sorrow for that man's death. The world is certainly no worse for him not being in it. Although it is too bad that justice cannot be served in the courts, I have to agree with this statement (insert whatever god you believe in, or fate or karma if you will...):
Quote:
"However, it seems that God punished him already," said Hajra Catic of the Association of Srebrenica mothers.
post #4 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by valanhb
I certainly can't say that I feel any sorrow for that man's death. The world is certainly no worse for him not being in it. Although it is too bad that justice cannot be served in the courts, I have to agree with this statement (insert whatever god you believe in, or fate or karma if you will...):
Yes, he is now in the hands of God to meet his true fate.
post #5 of 19
It's just as well that no more public money will be spent on him. His trial has only been going on for five :censor::censor::censor::censor::censor::censor::censor:' years.
post #6 of 19
From here, his death will be seen by some as a relief, by some as punishment by God, and by some as preventing true closure. But I am afraid that it will also stir up resentment and blame again - many in this part of the world do still see him as a kind of hero, even now. Maybe it will move things closer to the Serbs giving up Mladic and Karadjic, though I doubt it.
post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyranson
From here, his death will be seen by some as a relief, by some as punishment by God, and by some as preventing true closure. But I am afraid that it will also stir up resentment and blame again - many in this part of the world do still see him as a kind of hero, even now. Maybe it will move things closer to the Serbs giving up Mladic and Karadjic, though I doubt it.
There were false reports here of Mladic being arrested a week or so ago. The EU is basically telling Serbia that it has to give them up if talks about EU membership are to be opened, but I can't see that happening, either.
Things might have been different if Djindjic (sp?) hadn't have been assassinated.
post #8 of 19
Good riddance to bad garbage.
Dying in his sleep was too kind for the monster.
post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by valanhb
I certainly can't say that I feel any sorrow for that man's death. The world is certainly no worse for him not being in it. Although it is too bad that justice cannot be served in the courts, I have to agree with this statement (insert whatever god you believe in, or fate or karma if you will...):

Way too much time and money was wasted on this man's trial, finally some justice has been served. I can't recall having actually been happy to hear the news of someone's death before, it's a weird feeling.
post #10 of 19
Who is he??



P.s why does tcs say that i have to make my characters to 20? and just not allowed to type "who is he?"
post #11 of 19
He was the dictator who took over Serbia after the collapse of communism and then by using nationalist policies for his own advantage was the man most responsible for dragging the whole of Yugoslavia into the terrible ethnic wars of the 90s. His trial at the international Court of Justice in The Hague has been long and expensive, but his millions of victims and their families wanted the world to witness their suffering and for justice to be seen to be done. Some feel cheated of that. No one who has visited the mass grave sites or the concentration camps (I used to work for the International Commission on Missing Persons and believe me, real hatred should be reserved for people who tie peoples' hands with wire, shoot or strangle them and topple them into pits containing up to 400 bodies), or met families who lost people in the wars can deny the people the right to some kind of satisfaction. Now no verdict will ever be announced and he has escaped punishment.
post #12 of 19
my mom is releived. she says he will get what he deserves from God and the ghosts of those he killed, including, in a round about way, my gram. though.. it leaves us all sort of lost as to what to think you know?
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyranson
Now no verdict will ever be announced and he has escaped punishment.
History has a way of pronouncing its own verdicts, I think. Hitler was never convicted—nor even brought to trial—for his crimes, and yet only a tiny fraction doubt his enormous guilt. And in a case like this, what punishment would have ever been enough?
post #14 of 19
I do agree that he will be judged by history. But there are so many refugees who lost everything, and of course the families of the dead who were waiting to hear a verdict, who wanted to see him punished in some way, and they now feel cheated. I am sure many Holocaust survivors felt the same (not that I am trying to compare the 6 million Nazi victims with the 350,000 or so who died in the Yugoslav wars).
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyranson
I do agree that he will be judged by history. But there are so many refugees who lost everything, and of course the families of the dead who were waiting to hear a verdict, who wanted to see him punished in some way, and they now feel cheated. I am sure many Holocaust survivors felt the same (not that I am trying to compare the 6 million Nazi victims with the 350,000 or so who died in the Yugoslav wars).
I think it's not unfair to compare the victims of Milosovic's genocide with those who were killed by the Nazis. The Nazis killed more people, of course, but every person killed was an individual and really, I don't think you can say that Milosovic was "not as bad" as Hitler just because he "only" was responsible for the deaths of 350,000 people.

It does worry me, though, to hear about people talking about how they feel "cheated" if the perpetrator of the crime is not punished in a particular way. In the US we heard it in this past week in the death penalty trial of Zacarias Moussaoui, the person accused of conspiracy in the 9/11 terrorist attacks. When it looked like the death penalty might be taken off the table, relatives of victims were saying on TV that it was like their loved ones dying all over again. Or when the Oklahoma City bombers were executed - it made me sad to think that a lot of family members probably thought that they would have some sort of "closure" once Timothy McVeigh was dead. I suspect that most of them were very, very disappointed to realize that they did not find the peace they were seeking once he was dead. Healing just has to come from other sources.

I just don't think it's a sign of health or healing to want to see someone suffer for what they did to you and your family. I'm not saying it's not natural to an extent, just that it's probably not really a good thing. Those who believe in God certainly can believe that someone will be punished in exactly the way s/he deserves. And even aside from that, wanting revenge isn't a good thing. It should be enough to know that the person will never hurt anyone else again. Healing beyond that point is obviously far from easy, but it also doesn't fall within the scope of the criminal justice system.
post #16 of 19
I think it is not so much revenge or punishment people seek as closure. The fact that there will be no verdict announced and the book will never be closed properly is upsetting to some families. It feels unfinished. The only thing that would help is if Karadzic and Mladic are brought to trial.
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyranson
I think it is not so much revenge or punishment people seek as closure. The fact that there will be no verdict announced and the book will never be closed properly is upsetting to some families. It feels unfinished. The only thing that would help is if Karadzic and Mladic are brought to trial.
I think you're right, but I still think even if Milosevic had been convicted, people would have found that it didn't have the effect they hoped it would.
post #18 of 19
Here people just wanted the satisfaction of a verdict, especially since even now many in Serbia and the Serbian part of Bosnia still deny any war crimes or genocide ever took place. Victims wanted a court to confirm to the world what had happened. I don't think most people cared what actually happened to Milosevic, one way or the other.
post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoe'n'MissKitty
Good riddance to bad garbage.
Dying in his sleep was too kind for the monster.
My first thought on hearing of his death was Good riddance to bad rubbish! But then I thought of his poor victims, and their families. And I thought of this horrible man facing God's wrath.
I guess I am just glad he is gone. May his victims rest in peace.
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