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Adopted ferals and your own home-cats

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
I did notice an interesting phenomen reading the tells of people taking care of ferals.

Here in Sweden, the usual is to try to catch the feral/stray/homeless and take them in. SheHe comes to somebody who socializes the cat. When socialized and tame - shehe gets a permanent home. These voluntary socializers ("supporthomes") are very often catowners and or they have several such ex. homeless cats.
Of course. ONE reason is the socializing is much easier if there is a friendly tame home-cat who becames pal with the ex-feral.

OK. What do they tell. The feral comes in. Do hide somewhere. Is there the first 24-48 hours. After some time comes out to eat, uses the litter usually first at night. After some time he comes out, looks shy at the human. Began to socialize with the home-cats. Begans very slowly to socialize with the human.
After a time shehe joins the homecats when they sleep at night in the humans bed. Although shehe is still afraid to be touched by the human...

The point? The feral and the home-cats do almost never quarrel with each other!!! They NEVER fight, perhaps only do some hissing. Sometimes not even that. Much less than if another tame cat would come as visitor. Usually they became very friendly with each other - and usually quite fast.

How this came?? I think when the feral comes, shehe is shy, afraid - both of the human and shehe knows it is another cats revire. So shehe dont tryies to fight for revire, shehe only tries to survive. And therefore shehe isnt a threat to the home-cats.
And they feel it, and therefore dont try to bully the new one.
Later on, when the now semiferal begins to came out - they all know shehe is lowest in the peck-ladder, is almost like a kitten, so there is still no need to hiss and threat....

Interesting? Yes. Important to know?? YES!
There are surely many who could, and want to help out a homeless, perhaps semiferal shy cat. But they dont dare, they think: I dont want to hurt my own beloved home-cat. I dont my own Henry to feel afraid in his own home.

But in practice this fear is unnecessary. The shy feral is almost NEVER a threat to the homecats.
(The home-cats must of course be fully vaccinated, and you should have a quarantine room till you are sure the feral is healthy and parasite-free, but this is another story).

So the shy feral ISNT a threat to your homecat.

And the aggressive feral is of course never taken inside... Not by a green amateur in any case.
post #2 of 14
My house is filled with former ferals. I totally agree that the tame cats do a better job at socializing them than I do. Once tame, former ferals become the ambassadors to the newly arrived ferals.

I also believe that cats arriving from feral cat colonies are more used to living with other cats and therefore tend to fit in better than those not used to living with other cats. There may be dominance issues, but generally they all get along.
post #3 of 14
I agree! I have added several ferals to my homecats, and do not believe I could have tamed them without the help of my kitties.

Jill used to run from me, and Garfield would run with her. He just thought it was fun to run. Then he would immediately return to me, and it made her think about it!

My Jasmine is still a little shy, and definitely looks to Festus and Garfield to help her feel more comfortable with us humans.

The feral cats get used to the house cats very quickly! And they don't fight. I agree that adding a feral kitty to your house cat is a nice thing. Even if they never get tame enough to be your pet, they will be a fine companion for your kitty!
post #4 of 14
I agree as well. Adult ferals are well-versed in the pecking order. The ones I have taken in will act submissive to the cat/s already there. I've been lucky in that I've never had an aggressive feral.

Kittens, on the other hand, have no manners, and think, "What's mine is mine, and what's yours is mine".
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by clixpix
Kittens, on the other hand, have no manners, and think, "What's mine is mine, and what's yours is mine".
AMEN to that!
post #6 of 14
Bobber is quite aware that there are feral males on "her" property.
She chased Tommie two away a couple of weeks ago!! But he comes back.
I'm not sure if my other cats are aware of these ferals as mine have been cooped up inside all winter. I'll have to see what spring brings!!
post #7 of 14
I agree with everyone. Our ferals, when caught, are fixed and released in our large walkout basement and then our fenced in yard. Including our house cats, they all get along. I have one older tom who was very wild and intimidating before I caught and had him neutered. Today, in our yard, I can pet him and carry him. He has changed completely. Everyone, keep up the good work you are doing.
post #8 of 14
When I adopted Zoey I didnt under stand feral vs stray .... I quickly learned.. but Zoey has been with us now about 15 months and is more domesticated than my domestic kitty... Mom and I nearly took her back during those first few weeks but I am so glad we didnt ... this dicussion is facinating
post #9 of 14
At the moment I have 4 home cats (2 are borders--leaving perhaps this June (Mom comes back from Korea), 2 outside ferals and 4 ferals who believe they own the inside of my house (and the outside)!! The oldest feral (Grandma Empsy who is in and out now) is quite aggressive at times (and she is soooo tiny), and rarely backs down to anyone else. She doesn't start the argument but does have the last word in the matter. Most of the time, everyone gets along with everybody else. Now, I have a new sortof problem. I am being slowly adopted in some manner or the other. A beautiful black male showed up one day and began visiting and passing time on my outside furniture (2 cat trees, an OS loveseat, a bench and a porch swing all for my cats). Then one day he demanded to come in so I let him. He came in and ate, searched the house, laid down and stayed about an hour then left. He does this about every other day and one night he stayed all night. So I named him. Scooter Tooter. I have no idea if he belongs to someone or is someone else's stray feral. He really isn't very friendly to me and lets me and the others who get too close know, but he has accepted me sortof as that person who opens the door and handles the food LOL.

Beverly













Quote:
Originally Posted by clixpix
I agree as well. Adult ferals are well-versed in the pecking order. The ones I have taken in will act submissive to the cat/s already there. I've been lucky in that I've never had an aggressive feral.

Kittens, on the other hand, have no manners, and think, "What's mine is mine, and what's yours is mine".
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by clixpix

Kittens, on the other hand, have no manners, and think, "What's mine is mine, and what's yours is mine".
HAHAHAHA
BOY oh BOY!! You can say THAT again!!!!

I adopted my little KatyKitty and she was 5-6 weeks old. She was TERRIBLE at first! She was aggressive, and full of the beans at first! She figured SHE owns this place, so what are WE doing here??!! AND she was sure she was going to be dominant of my other kitty, Miss Missy. (Miss Missy had OTHER ideas about that! ) She has settled down, in the past couple months, but I do believe we'd have had an easier time, with a kitty who was a bit older!
post #11 of 14
I also believe AND TOTALLY AGREE WITH the fact that home cats help you train/tame/socialize the ferals. Great post! My household is living proof....
post #12 of 14
Our Pru relaxes right away with us when one of the other cats is near by. Her purr machine kicks right in as soon as Clio jumps up next to her. Clio has started grooming Pru's ears for a few licks, Pru returned the favor by kneading on Clio's chest, poor Clio. Pru is taking her cues from the other two. I think she would still be quite wild without the other's example to follow. She watches the other two and sees that they like us and we must not be that bad after all. And I was afraid they wouldn't get along together.
post #13 of 14
I thought this was going to be a thread about the domestic cats beating up the poor ferals, because that is what happens at my house. My Graycie just does not want anymore foster cats or kittens and she lets them know it. When I first moved into this apartment building I let her go outside, not realizing the cats outside were a colony and SHE GOT INTO FIGHTS all the time until she started going across the street.

Then I had to pull her inside. She's the bad cat! (And she's a tiny little thing, too.)
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by goldenwren
He really isn't very friendly to me and lets me and the others who get too close know, but he has accepted me sortof as that person who opens the door and handles the food LOL.

Beverly
My "sister" (ok, we're not related, but we might as well be!) had
this happen to her. A HUGE tom "adopted" her - pretty much
the same way as you described. For a few years he simply
came by several days a week for food and - later - pets, and
then would disappear again. He usually "paid" for his board
by leaving "gifts" of dead birds etc. on her doorstep.

Over time - maybe 3-4 years? - He became one of the household.
He died of diabetes at a ripe old age, and was a HUGE lapcat.
He was very friendly, although always independent and lordly.
He became one of my favorites, and glommed onto my lap whenever
I came to visit.

Watch out! I think you're marked!

Carol
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