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Can I shave my cat?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I just got a cat from my grandmother after she moved to New York City. It is an extremely hairy cat and I was wondering if you can use clippers on a cat like a dog? Can you take them in to get shaved at a groomer? I have never had a cat so am unsure on what a cat can take. Any info would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

post #2 of 16
I dont think it will harm him but I dont think they will be very happy with you. If you want to keep the shedding down try brushing him daily. I hope you enjoy your new roomie!
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
Are there professional cat groomers?
post #4 of 16
Yes. You should call the local groomer and see if they do cats too. I honestly qouldnt reccommend shaving that baby though.
post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the scoop.

He is hacking up too many hairballs and he keeps getting poop stuck to the hair around his anus and tail. Any tips on controling that? I am such a moron when it comes to cats.
post #6 of 16
Trim the hair around his butt so it isnt so long. They have hair ball control food and stuff. Hair balls are a fact of kitty life. Using a sheeding brush should cut down on the hair he ingests while cleaning himself wich in turn leads to less hairballs.
post #7 of 16
Awwww he looks gorgeous as he is

Certainly brush him because it really does help, and i have to trim Rosies fluffy bum as well.
post #8 of 16
I have had to shave a cat before. She is a little "out there" mentally and is incapable of cleaning herself, and therefore gets big mats of fur on her back. However, I took her to a cat groomer to have this done. I can't imagine any cat nicely complying to being shaved!

I suggest you try some of the other advice (food, brushing) before you do something so drastic as shaving. It would be traumatic for your pet :-/
post #9 of 16
People do have their cats shaved at the groomers sometimes...generally it is for severe mats. It is not very attractive, but it can be done! Most people just brush often, and don't worry too much about the occasional hairball.

How nice of you to take in this kitty! Orange cats are supposed to be the friendliest! He is just beautiful!
post #10 of 16
We want to know more about this baby. Boy or girl, name. Fill us in!
post #11 of 16
I have a long hair cat that I took to a groomer every other month for what they call a lion cut. They leave the hair long on the head and the lower half of the legs because cats won't allow shaving there. The tail is an option. I was getting it done really for my other cat who has digestive problems and when they were still really young they would wrestle and chew on each other and he was swallowing a lot of hair even with regular brushing of the long hair cat. I had to call around to find a groomer and she made no promises other than she would try. Turned out my cat was no problem other than being very vocal about her displeasure. Now that they are a little older and not being quite as active at playing I have went back to regular brushing. If she is really matted you could get it done once and then keep it up with the brushing.
post #12 of 16
I groom cats- and IMO that one doesn't look as if he needs it. He does however look like he has quite a bit of undercoat that needs to be removed.

I would try giving him a high quality food supplemented with essential fatty acids, and combing him regularly. If you are having difficulty combing him then a trip to a groomer for a lesson couldn't hurt- it would help educate you and give you a perfectly combed out cat to start fresh with.

But on the flip side- yes many people do have their cats shaved to cut down on shedding. It is not attractive IMO, and does not totally eliminate the problem (which again IMO is mostly diet related) but is just a quick fix.

It is also traumatic for the cat (degree of stress varies by cat), and not too easy on your pocketbook, either. Please do not try and do it yourself- both of you will come out bleeding.
post #13 of 16
My oldest cat has really long hair and he doesn't like being brushed thankfully no mats. The other long hair-likes brushing as she used to get lots of mats which I will either pull (ow!!) off or cut off. You just have to be consistant with the brushing!!
post #14 of 16
If he is not matting up, take him to a groomer and ask for a sanitary cut (this is a clipping of the area around his backside and prevents 'klingons').

For hairball and shedding control a good quality diet and daily brushing will nip those in the bud.
post #15 of 16
Hi, I also have a long-haired orange cat. He was also having problems with hairballs and constipation, but we put him on a high fiber diet and kitty laxative. it helped pass his hairballs through instead of throwing them up. Also he has the same problem with poops getting stuck in his long bum fur, so we trim it right down. I don't suggest trying to shave him yourself. We tried to clip him, but it was absolutely impossible. The noise of the clippers scared him too much to be able to keep him still. A quick trim with sissors works great! Just make sure you have someone help you hold him!
post #16 of 16
Hi! This kitty doesn't need to be shaved - except perhaps his rear end area.
I have a cat who was once so obese she could not lick her bum, so we had to shave it (due to poo being stuck back there.). She didn't like it, and it
didn't look wonderful, but it worked. We were all much happier!

A groomer with cat expertise and your vet can help you clip his rear end, or
shave it down so you don't have that problem.

Diet supplements and also use of a product from the vet for hairballs - something you give them orally (I forget the name... ) would help
with fur balls. You may also give him a bit of extra olive oil once or
twice a week (helps with the fur balls) in his food. (about 1/4 to 1/8th a teaspoon).
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