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Spaying

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
Bella and Cinders are five and half months old now and my husband and I are talking about when we should get them spayed. When we took them for their first check up with our vet, he said 6 months would be fine. However, I have heard that it would be better for their health if we waited until they started to call

So my question is, should I wait or get it done as soon as they hit 6 months?
post #2 of 25
I would make the appointments now, they are ready now. If you wait till after their first heat their chances of mammary cancer later in life increase dramatically, they are very noisy when in heat and you will have alot of sleepless nights, they will try to get outside to find a mate, and you could have tom's hanging around your house spraying if they catch wind of them, and the spaying surgery actually becomes more involved because the blood vessels to the uterus become larger and it becomes a bloodier surgery (alot of vets charge more because of this).
post #3 of 25
i never heard about waiting until they go into heat, instead i head it's much more dangerous to do it while they're in heat and vets charge more to have it done.
post #4 of 25
I would say that they are pretty much ready to be spayed!

As has been said, it is a more difficult surgery to do while the cat is in heat, but I think you were asking about getting them spayed after their first heat! (?) Molly was due her spay and had to have it delayed until the end of her cycle as she was in heat, it is recommended not to perform surgey during.

I would also speak with your vet, they are better to advise you!
post #5 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sar
I would say that they are pretty much ready to be spayed!

As has been said, it is a more difficult surgery to do while the cat is in heat, but I think you were asking about getting them spayed after their first heat! (?) Molly was due her spay and had to have it delayed until the end of her cycle as she was in heat, it is recommended not to perform surgey during.

I would also speak with your vet, they are better to advise you!
Thanks Sar Yes, I meant after their first heat - not during. Going to ring my vet in a minute and get them booked in.
post #6 of 25
My vet always advises 6 months so i would get their appointment made as well
post #7 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rosiemac
My vet always advises 6 months so i would get their appointment made as well
Thanks. I spoke to my vet a while back about spaying at 6 months versus early spaying and he was saying that the reason why he recommends 6 months is because it is easier for them to do when the kittens are a bit bigger
post #8 of 25
Thats right, plus their stronger for the anaesthetic as well.

Only in extreme circumstances will they do it under 6 months in the UK, such as aggression, but that doesn't happen often.

Are they booked in?.
post #9 of 25
Go with your vet - 6 months. There is no good reason to wait until they have their first heat. Plus you risk the possibility of them getting outside and getting pregnant. Cats in heat (and tom cats) have a sneaky way of getting outside.
post #10 of 25
Thread Starter 
Right, they are booked in for a nurse's appointment on Monday 13th at 5.10pm. Apparently they want to check the girls out first to make sure that they will be ok for anaesthesia. Based on that, an appointment will be made to get the job done (generally 2 days after)

And, oh god!!! According to their computer systems, my girls are already 6 months old!!!! They were born on 18th August and I was basing my premise of their age by month i.e. they would be 6 months old on 18th February
post #11 of 25
Thats ok, they'll still be fine
post #12 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petnurse2265
they are very noisy when in heat and you will have alot of sleepless nights, they will try to get outside to find a mate, and you could have tom's hanging around your house spraying if they catch wind of them
That's what I've just been told. I can't believe they are ready already. It only seemed like yesterday when I brought them home My babies are growing up so fast!
post #13 of 25
Thread Starter 
These are probably questions for when I see them on Monday but I'm going to take advantage of everyone's experience here

What sort of recovery period will I be looking at once they have been spayed? Will they have to wear plastic collars to stop them picking at stitches or anything like that? They play fight a lot at the moment and I was going to start stressing about them tearing each other's stitches out but I guess that won't happen because they will be sore and not inclined to play rough for a while?

I hope they don't hate me and will trust me again once this is all over (can you tell I've never had kittens before???)
post #14 of 25
Rosie and Sophie were a bit wobbly when they came back, but the following day they were fine Just make sure you don't let them jump up any heights and try and not let them run around too much.

I had to put the e-collars on them, but Sophie managed not only to get her collar off after 3 days, but also managed to pull out one of her stitches Luckily she was going that night for a post spay checkup to make sure she was healing ok, so they didn't have to add another stitch but i just had to tighten the e-collar slightly.

Sophie was going to have what they call sub cut sutures which means theres no stiches on the outside, but because they had to make her incision a little larger they couldn't so they had to do outside as well.

Trust me they won't hate you and they'll still be just as mischeivous!
post #15 of 25
Molly was just a bit quiet when she came back from her spay - but it didn't last long! She was doing really well without the collar until she took it upon herself to remove the a stitch and subsequently the other!

I took her for a quick check up because of this, so she had a shot of antibiotics, to be on the safe side, and she was back to normal in no time!!
post #16 of 25
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the advice!

I think I will restrict the girls to the kitchen when they get back rather than let them have the run of the whole house. I'll also put a little stool next to their radiator bed so they don't have to make great leaps to get into it

I'm concerned about Bella getting hers and Cindy's stitches out which is why I was thinking about getting her a collar. I'm not so worried about Cindy as she is a lot calmer than her sister

Just one last question... once I get them home, do I need to take a few days off work to keep an eye on them just in case?
post #17 of 25
I took them in on the friday so i had the full weekend with them as well, but they should be fine with just the day of their operation.

One guy at work dropped his cat of in the morning but didn't pick her up until he left work.

They rang me sooner than i imagined because Sophie came around very quickly and was meowing the whole surgery down!. She was upstairs but you could hear her in the waiting room, so they had to ring me to collect her asap because it was stressing the other animals
post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pui Hang
That's what I've just been told. I can't believe they are ready already. It only seemed like yesterday when I brought them home My babies are growing up so fast!

I know, my Sturgis will be 3 in May and I still think of him as my little baby, though alot of that is because he still sucks on our ears several times a day when he needs comforting.
post #19 of 25
Now you've made me think, Rosies 4 next month!! I can still remember the day i picked her up and how small she was
post #20 of 25
Incidentally, there is a vet sort of in my area that does do early spay/neuter, one of the local rescues have been using him for over 14 years now with no problems, and the kittens and puppies actually get over the anaesthetic quicker than when they are 6 months old. I saw a 16 week old puppy that had been spayed at 8 weeks and the scar was so tiny and barely there. They spay/neuter all puppies and kittens before they are rehomed to stop people 'forgetting' and taking them back in a few months complete with babies. And most vets will neuter at 5 months if you have a brother and sister. When I was reading up on mammary cancer, cats are 200 times less likely to get it if spayed before their first heat.
Good luck with them. One of the fosters I had spayed was more hyper after coming back from the vets than she was before she went, someone must have forgot to tell her that she was supposed to be dopey and wanting to rest!!
post #21 of 25
I didn't have any problems after my little girl was spayed. I picked her up the day after surgery. She and my other cat who is a few monthes older usually rough house but he seemed to know she was hurt and there was no rough housing. I believe cats communicate in ways that we don't pick up on. She didn't have an e-collar but she left the incision alone and she healed up fine.
post #22 of 25
I had to seperate Missy, Betsy, Baker, Spalding, Spritzer & Scampi because they all tried pulling each others stitches out, even though they all had e-collars on it didn't stop them getting to each other. So you might want to keep an eye on them if you put them together in a room.
post #23 of 25
I have never had a problem with the cats after coming back home from surgery. They never had to wear an E-collar either. I have all my cats fixed at 8-12 weeks. They never really seem to notice either. They sleep a lot the first day and then they are fine after that. Sometimes a lump will form around the incision but that goes away. I never realized it was such an issue with some vets to insist on waiting until 6 months. I don't get it because at 6 months, they could have gone into heat by then. Why risk it? Well all vets are different I guess. I would say get them in now and just keep them confined to a small room to recover.
post #24 of 25
Thread Starter 
Well, I was half an hour late at the surgery after having major hassles getting the girls into their basket. They both fit into one basket at the moment but today, they decided it would be much more fun not to visit the vet and play one kitten in and one kitten out i.e. I get one kitten into the basket but as soon as I try to get the second one in, the first one jumps out!

After having my arms, chest and face scratched to pieces (Valentines Day is going to be interesting when people see my face tomorrow ), I gave up. I left Cinders in the basket and went to find a box to put Bella in.

The vet pronounced them to be perfectly healthy so they are being fixed on Friday and being micro-chipped at the same time. I was given the option of having bloodwork done prior to the op - they didn't think it was necessary but said it was up to me. I've said "No" for the time being but can change my mind. Do you think I should get their bloodwork done?

The drive to and from the vets was absolutely horrible Both Cindy and Bella howled and cried all the way there, they were fine in the surgery and then cried all the way home. Cindy even meowed in a way that I had never heard before and it was rather scary

Anyway, we are all home now and they seem to still trust me despite all the trauma of getting there and back. Bella is fast asleep cuddled into my side and Cinders did come over meowing for attention but has left me in favour of food

Oh yes, and while I was there, I bought another cat carrier
post #25 of 25
I got the bloodwork done when mine were spayed/neutered. I think however it was more for me than for the cats. A former coworker of mine who had rescued one of my cats, has had animals of all kinds for years and knows a lot about animals never got it done on her young and healthy animals. Here anyway it wasn't a large amount extra so it was worth it for the extra peace of mind.
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