TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › The Cat Lounge › The UK / US language Barrier
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The UK / US language Barrier - Page 2

post #31 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdpesz
Ahem...
In America, "Randy" is a proper name, not an adjective. Nuff said?
I have a brother AND a nephew named Randy and, yes they both ARE! My former stepdaughter, named "Randi" isn't.
post #32 of 54
I remember a few things from the times I gone to the UK
What they call Car Park-we call parking lot.
Instead of backing up your car-it was reversing.
Potato chips-you call crisps and have really odd flavours-Prawn???
There are probably lots more that don't come to mind.
I also remember that the coach driver said women don't usually order pints of beer only half pints at a time-the women who ordered pints were of looser moral character!!!!
Oh....Answer Phone instead of Answering Machine!!!
I read 3-4 English garden magazines a month so there is lots of terminology I am used to...Beetroot instead of Beets. Minced meat insteadof ground meat.
Marrows and courogettes (sorry spelling) instead of squash and zucchini.
And I LOVE PIMMS!!!!!!!!!!!!!
post #33 of 54
Im learning quite a lot from this thread! One thing I could do with clearing up though, why oh why, do you call a cotton bud a q-tip?
post #34 of 54
And why, why, is a cookie, "biscuit"?
post #35 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pombina
Im learning quite a lot from this thread! One thing I could do with clearing up though, why oh why, do you call a cotton bud a q-tip?
Q-tip is the most popular brand name of those ... things. (I just checked their website; technically, those are "cotton swabs." Never in my life have I heard anyone refer to cotton swabs.) So basically, it's a lot like saying Kleenex when what you really mean is any facial tissue. Or, on your side of the pond, saying Hoover when what you really mean is any vacuum cleaner.
post #36 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by stampit3d
What do the English call Flip Flops???
Not too long ago we called them "THONGS" here in the US....but things in even "our version of English" have ways of changing over time.
Linda
You know what? Now that I think about it, I am pretty sure that people started calling them flip-flops to differentiate them from the relatively newly popular undergarment made of, basically, string. I think those types of panties used to be called G-strings.
post #37 of 54
I am native New Yorker now living in Scotland. The first time a little girl asked me if they could clap my dog I had no idea what they wanted. I had to wait for my Scottish hubby to come home and tell me. It means pet your dog.

scottish US
wind screen- wind shield
jelly- jello
braces - suspenders
suspenders - garter belt
hen - slang for woman
cooker- stove or oven
boiler- hot water heater,furnace
pudding- dessert
jam- jelly or jam
tomato sauce- catsup
dressed- neuter or spayed animal
tea- supper,dinner
lolly- popsicle
sweets- candy
pressed apple juice-cider
post #38 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bullit
I am native New Yorker now living in Scotland. The first time a little girl asked me if they could clap my dog I had no idea what they wanted. I had to wait for my Scottish hubby to come home and tell me. It means pet your dog.

scottish US
wind screen- wind shield
jelly- jello
braces - suspenders
suspenders - garter belt
hen - slang for woman
cooker- stove or oven
boiler- hot water heater,furnace
pudding- dessert
jam- jelly or jam
tomato sauce- catsup
dressed- neuter or spayed animal
tea- supper,dinner
lolly- popsicle
sweets- candy
pressed apple juice-cider
Haha thats funny, I'm from England and now live in scotland and found the clapping thing very strange, still do...
Where I live in Dundee it's like a whole other language of its own I really struggle with it sometimes.
Another 'Scottism' is 'where do you stay?' or 'where do you bide?' meaning 'where do you live?'.
Also a Fish and Chip shop/Chippy is a Chipper?
'How?' instead of 'why?'
'aye' instead of 'yes'... the list is endless
post #39 of 54
It's often difficult for me to remember which version of spelling/word is UK and which is US. Hence my sometimes perhaps confusing mixes. I mostly try to stick to US English here and UK English everywhere else.
post #40 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by AbbysMom
I really do love it when Susan replies to a thread in Fur Pics and says "Bless his cotton socks" It puts a smile on my face every time.

My mum and my nan both said this (RIP).
Also, it was common to hear "love a duck" or "my duck" as a term of endearment
post #41 of 54
I've been working with Brits, Canadians, and Aussies for so long that I don't pay too much attention to our language differences any more. I had one colleague from Liverpool who used to get upset when I asked, "What's up?" when he called me. I meant, "What's happening?", and he understood, "What's wrong?" One British expression I had trouble with years ago was "boffin" (expert), which is what I'd call a "nerd". There's also "dole" (welfare). Not to mention the different interpretations of "tea".
post #42 of 54
Is it french? One term of endearment is "my little flea" Another is "my little cabbage"

Even though I generally use "US" English (I mix things up too... like a pullover vs. a sweater) my favorite is how I spell behaviour..... vs behavior (which is how it's supposed to be spelled here). lol
post #43 of 54
I spent some time in the UK and Ireland and don't forget fags which are smoked in England and even NZ but well, is a derisive word for soemthing else here. And take aways instead of take outs and subways which are porches here (Remeber the Petula Clark song "Don't Sleep in the Subway" - she was not singing about the tube, lol
post #44 of 54
I have a friend from south hampton UK, and she is just adorable! She likes to call everyone "cheeky", and she always refers to underwear as pantaloons, or bloomers... Now mind you she is only 28..... I thought bloomers and pantaloons went out in the victorian age!!!!! Bless her heart!!!
post #45 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by evnshawn
You know what? Now that I think about it, I am pretty sure that people started calling them flip-flops to differentiate them from the relatively newly popular undergarment made of, basically, string. I think those types of panties used to be called G-strings.
I've been calling those flip-flops since I got my first pair in 1983!
post #46 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by huggles
I dont believe this original post was saying you NEVER say/ call these things this - rather WE never do (most of everything you are saying goes for us here as well)
I know...I know...I'm just a perfectionist though, I really can't help it! I know it annoys people sometimes. I really try not to correct people all the time, it's just a habit I guess. When I see something that isn't, like, just right I have an urge to fix it, and if I don't & nobody else does sometimes it really bothers me. I'm just weird like that.

So anyways, yeah sometimes I catch posts on TCS that just kinda make me go "Huh?". It just sounds so weird to us in America, the phrases you guys say sometimes. But I was wondering, what is there that WE say that may sound weird to the people in the UK??
post #47 of 54
Oh we speak the queens english in NZ, well some of us do but no "US English" here!

They aren't flip flops or thongs they're jandals!

A g-string is a g-string, you don't hear them being called thongs here

The path on the side of the road is a foot path

Hood is also neighbourhood - 50 cent in da hood

Can of spaghetti, can of beer - tin of paint

We use root in both ways.
post #48 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcat
I've been working with Brits, Canadians, and Aussies for so long that I don't pay too much attention to our language differences any more. I had one colleague from Liverpool who used to get upset when I asked, "What's up?" when he called me. I meant, "What's happening?", and he understood, "What's wrong?" One British expression I had trouble with years ago was "boffin" (expert), which is what I'd call a "nerd". There's also "dole" (welfare). Not to mention the different interpretations of "tea".

So, now I finally understand why they used to say someone is on the dole, when they were on Welfare or Relief. It's an old fashioned expression here in the US, but I've heard older people use that expression
post #49 of 54
We say the dole here!
post #50 of 54
I've never heard an American (U.S. citizen) use "dole" as a noun, but some people say "dole out", meaning to distribute or hand out. Here's a good one: One of my Canadian colleagues told our translators' class to ask me how I'd translate "scuttlebutt" into German. I came up with a German word, "Gerüchteküche", (literal translation: "rumor kitchen"), but I really have no idea how the expression "scuttlebutt" arose. Does anybody know?
post #51 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcat
I've never heard an American (U.S. citizen) use "dole" as a noun, but some people say "dole out", meaning to distribute or hand out. Here's a good one: One of my Canadian colleagues told our translators' class to ask me how I'd translate "scuttlebutt" into German. I came up with a German word, "Gerüchteküche", (literal translation: "rumor kitchen"), but I really have no idea how the expression "scuttlebutt" arose. Does anybody know?
i think it's a navy term
post #52 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by laureen227
i think it's a navy term
http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-scu1.htm

One of the coolest sites ever. Er, yes, I am a geek. Why do you ask?
post #53 of 54
This thread is so great! There are lots of experessions that make so much more sense now. Hmmm....where can I use my new words?

Hey....isn't there a saying or something in a song about 'a rootin' tootin' 'cowboy' or something like that? Does that mean what it could mean now that I've been a little more word educated???
post #54 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoochNNoodles
Hey....isn't there a saying or something in a song about 'a rootin' tootin' 'cowboy' or something like that? Does that mean what it could mean now that I've been a little more word educated???
That is a VERY good question!!!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: The Cat Lounge
TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › The Cat Lounge › The UK / US language Barrier