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Pre-anesthesia bloodwork before spay?

post #1 of 90
Thread Starter 
Hi All,

I am getting my healthy 5 month old kitty spayed next month. When I called the vet to make the appointment, they said the vet likes to do pre-anesthesia bloodwork on all the cats just in case. The bloodwork, of course, would cost extra ($45).

Do you all think this would be a good idea to get the bloodwork or just an unnecessary cost?
post #2 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by rosie0708
Hi All,

I am getting my healthy 5 month old kitty spayed next month. When I called the vet to make the appointment, they said the vet likes to do pre-anesthesia bloodwork on all the cats just in case. The bloodwork, of course, would cost extra ($45).

Do you all think this would be a good idea to get the bloodwork or just an unnecessary cost?
It is a very good idea to have this done and the price you were quoted is reasonable.
If your cat is sensitive or allergic to anesthesia, they can die during the procedure. For most cats, this isn't a problem, but why take the chance?
We do this for every one of our cats, prior to going under the knife for any reason.
post #3 of 90
I voted yes. I think pre-anesthesia bloodwork is a very good idea, and it's especially important to have this done before any surgical procedure is performed on an aging cat. The bloodwork lets the vet check to make sure the cat's vital organs are functioning normally, and also select the best anesthesia.
post #4 of 90
We have never done it for any of our cats. As long as your cat has no illnesses and conditions you no about personally I wouldnt bother. The way the vets try and push it on you always feels like its a way for them to make more money (maybe i'm too cynical)
post #5 of 90
I have a sad story that goes with this very topic.

Tommy was my very first abyssinian cat. Abyssinians tend to have bad teeth genetically. When Tommy was 5 years old I took him to get his teeth worked on as I did many times before. This time Tommy didn't survive the anethestic. He died in a really weird drug induced state 3 days later in a cold cage at the vets office. He initially came home after the teeth cleaning the next day. I got home form work and he came to say hi(he was still drugged acting) and made a sweet meow and collapsed on the floor. We took him to emergencey vet and they gave him fluids and released him to us that night. Tommy went in and out of coma all night. I took him to the vet that worked on his teeth the next day and they kept him. I went to visit him for 3 days and he never really came out of the drug induced state he was in. He died on the 3rd day. I learned a hard lesson from that experience.

I also learned that Ketamine is a very hard drug on their kidneys and livers. From that day forward I always request that the vet uses ISO for anesthetic. It is a gas and they don't get so drugged up. It is a little more expensive but worth it in the long run!!!! It is not hard on their kidneys and liver.

Kim
post #6 of 90
We recommend it also at my clinic for every patient, young and old. You never know just by looking at them, what's going on inside them. It's always better to be safe than sorry.
post #7 of 90
I always think if its that important a test the vets would include it in the cost of the Spay/neuter. Lots of people struggle to pay for the spay/neuter so i feel its a bit like morally forcing them to spend more than they can afford. Our vet actually said to us that there wasnt much need unless the cat had some known condition.

Just my opinion.
post #8 of 90
no vet that i've evr gone to ever suggested it. in fact, i later found out that one of them does no bloodwork at all outside of the feluk test. i'm still trying to find a good one....
post #9 of 90
I got the extra bloodwork done before Chay's neuter, but only because my breeder told me that some Birmans are sensitive to anethesia, and so I wanted him to be as safe as possible.

I say its a good precaution, but not a necessity. For someone who can afford it, its a nice way to be extra sure that all goes well. But if you can't, you're not being negligent to not get it done, at least in my opinion.
post #10 of 90
My vet did it as a requirement. I guess there are just enough other vets in the area that people could choose to take thier cats to if they don't want it. It was included in the price of spaying them. He came higly recommended, and really, his price was very reasonable compared to other vets in the area.
post #11 of 90
I think the reason it's presented as an option rather than as a requirement is that most vets want to encourage people to alter their pets, so they present a bare-bones option at minimal cost, then the recommended option at increased cost.

The price quoted sounds reasonable (it's in line with what some vets in our area charge - some charge more), so if you can afford it I'd recommend getting the pre-op. Not only will it screen for hidden organ problems that might cause problems with anesthesia or during the surgery, even if your kitten is perfectly health it will give you a baseline to measure against future blood test results.

post #12 of 90
A resounding yes from us! This is not only wise prior to placing your kitty under anesthesia, but will also serve as a good baseline in the future.
post #13 of 90
I got my friend a Siamese kitten some years ago. She was a healthy, happy little girl kitty. When she took her for spaying, it turned out she was allergic to the anaesthetic and died on the operating table. So I'd say pay the $45 and get the pre-test done.
post #14 of 90
There is nothing in the blood panel that is going to tell you if an animal is going to be sensitive to the anesthetic, it just tells you how the internal organs are functioning at that particular time. We do not do a pre-anesthetic blood panel for young spays and neuters, and have never had a problem. On another note we did have a client that transferred from a banfield hospital that did have a pre-anesthetic blood panel taken before her spay (it was Shih tzu) and the dog was found to have high kidney values. The dog was diagnosed with kidney failure (congenital) and was told the dog would live maybe another 3 month's (by banfield). We kept the dog going happily till she was almost 2, then she went downhill fast. There are advantages to doing the bloodwork, but not an absolute necessity in my opinion. We do however require a blood panel on any pet over 7 years if they are going to go under an anesthetic.
post #15 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petnurse2265
There is nothing in the blood panel that is going to tell you if an animal is going to be sensitive to the anesthetic, it just tells you how the internal organs are functioning at that particular time. We do not do a pre-anesthetic blood panel for young spays and neuters, and have never had a problem. On another note we did have a client that transferred from a banfield hospital that did have a pre-anesthetic blood panel taken before her spay (it was Shih tzu) and the dog was found to have high kidney values. The dog was diagnosed with kidney failure (congenital) and was told the dog would live maybe another 3 month's (by banfield). We kept the dog going happily till she was almost 2, then she went downhill fast. There are advantages to doing the bloodwork, but not an absolute necessity in my opinion. We do however require a blood panel on any pet over 7 years if they are going to go under an anesthetic.
Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't there a sensitivity test for anesthesia?
post #16 of 90
No, there is not.
post #17 of 90
I'd say get it done. My sister has lost two dogs to anesthesia; one was being neutered, and the other was having his teeth cleaned. Both dogs were young, apparently healthy males, and the procedures were done at different veterinary practices.
post #18 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petnurse2265
No, there is not.
I'm going to have to confront both of our vets at 2 different practices now.
post #19 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petnurse2265
There is nothing in the blood panel that is going to tell you if an animal is going to be sensitive to the anesthetic, it just tells you how the internal organs are functioning at that particular time. We do not do a pre-anesthetic blood panel for young spays and neuters, and have never had a problem.
This is exactly what my vet explained to me the test did... I chose to have it done on Dori before she was spayed. I paid an additional $35 for the test.
post #20 of 90
I think that Ketamine is the worst drug in the world to give to animals for anesthetic. I have talked to other people who have lost their animals to that particular drug. After what happened to Tommy I will never let the any vet use that drug on one of my cats again. I have them use ISO on all my cats when they have to be put under. There is probably danger in that drug too, but not as much as ketamine. I notice a big difference when they come back from the vet, they are not as drugged up.
post #21 of 90
I am not familiar with the different types of anesthetics... I will be scheduling Dori a teeth cleaning in the next couple of months. What are the options? What is ISO?
post #22 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by abbycats
I think that Ketamine is the worst drug in the world to give to animals for anesthetic. I have talked to other people who have lost their animals to that particular drug. After what happened to Tommy I will never let the any vet use that drug on one of my cats again. I have them use ISO on all my cats when they have to be put under. There is probably danger in that drug too, but not as much as ketamine. I notice a big difference when they come back from the vet, they are not as drugged up.
Thanks for that information. I have several things to discuss with my Vets because of this thread.
I really hate it when I think I'm doing all I can to protect my cats and then find out maybe I'm not, or am being misled.
post #23 of 90
Thread Starter 
Everyone gave me some things to think about...I never thought about it being a good baseline for future blood work if she was going to need it.


to everyone for their input so far!
post #24 of 90
It used to be choice at my vets .But starting Jan 1st any type of surgery spay ect its know mandatory. I always had it done just to be safe.
post #25 of 90
It's never a bad idea to get bloodwork done. Cats can be very good at hiding subtle ailments that might eventually turn into something serious. Also, they might be a latent carrier of a variety of diseases, most of which can be treated if detected early or in latentcy, but that would otherwise be fatal. So yes, it's a very good idea to have bloodwork done, and also throughout the cat's life.
post #26 of 90
Did you ask them why you should have it done?

If not, here is why.

Your cat could die.

Granted, if you are going to a reputable clinic, they use VERY safe anesthetic, and the doctor does an exam of your pet before sedating them. However, your cat could be having kidney problems [the kidney's filter the anesthetic] which, in the first stages, or if the cat is just having an off day, you can't physically tell they are having an issue.

Most people think "Oh but my cat is young." Well here's a good example why that theory doesn't work.

We had two pomeranians who come into the clinic to get their teeth cleaned. One of them was 11, the other was only 3. The 11-year-old checked out fine. The 3-year-old's kidney values were really low. It's been about 2-3 years since they came in, and he's in the middle of renal failure.

If it were a neuter, it wouldn't bother me too much considering the cat is only under for a few minutes. A spay however, is really invasive and takes a bit longer. So it's good to be on the safe side, spending the extra $40 to ensure your cat's health.
post #27 of 90
Thread Starter 
Thank you all for the input. I did not know if it was a common practice, since my previous vet had never mentioned it too me.

Now I go to a vet that specializes in felines (who mentioned to me about the pre-anesthesia blood work), and I feel much better taking my kitties there (for more reasons than one). I am really leaning on the side of caution to get the blood work done. Thank you everyone for being so helpful!!!
post #28 of 90
In answer to the question about gas anesthesia ... "iso" is isoflurane. There is also another good one, sevoflurane. Both are far less damaging and metabolize quickly in the lungs instead of the kidneys. In most cases, the cats wake up as soon as the gas administration is halted and in many cases, the cats can come home the same day as surgery.

For anyone considering surgery on a cat, I would recommend speaking frankly with your vet - but on the charts for ALL of my cats, in big red letters, is written plainly for all to see: ~~ NO INJECTIBLE ANESTHESIA. NO KETAMINE ~~

My standing orders (your mileage may vary - talk with your vet) for anesthesia in my cats is as follows: Iso or Sevo mask down with continuous gas and O2 during the procedure with IV fluids and pain relief on board throughout.
post #29 of 90
Ok so here's a question. I've been posting about my cat that has a heart murmur and it's been advised she doesn't get spayed b/c she may die under anesthisia. However this past week I finally decided (after much thought) that it's torture on her body to go into heat all the time and so I finally scheduled an appointment to have her spayed knowing that she may not make it. I asked the vet about a reduced anesthisia (gas) spay (maybe that's the iso?) and the vet said that that tends to be more stressful on a cat's body b/c there's not as much pain relief. They said it'd probably be better to go with the other kind (injectible? ketamine?) so any advice on this?

For this situation I opted not to do blood work beause if anything comes back saying she can't be put under, then I'd probably have to put her to sleep.
post #30 of 90
They can add pain relief to the IV during the procedure so I don't know why your vet would say that ... I have followed your kitty's problems with interest in the other thread and was wondering how you were getting along.
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