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Cat was declawed not pooping on floor

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
HELP!!! I had a kitten who was using the litter box without a problem. I got him declawed and put shredded paper in and now he's pooping right next to the box. HE used the box twice but now he's going back to the carpet. What can i do
post #2 of 18
try putting his litter back in... and use an enzyme cleaner on the spots he has gone
post #3 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by snugglebaby9102
HELP!!! I had a kitten who was using the litter box without a problem. I got him declawed and put shredded paper in and now he's pooping right next to the box. HE used the box twice but now he's going back to the carpet. What can i do
He may not like the feel of the shredded paper.....I've heard that for declawed cats it is best to use a litter that is more of a "sand" consistency, like clay.

Katie
post #4 of 18
This is a direct effect of declawing. Please don't declaw any more furbabies.

But now it is too late, i would agree with sharky.
post #5 of 18
I would also take him back to your vet....make sure that there is no infection where the declaw occurred.

Katie
post #6 of 18
Try using rabbit pellets, they feel better for declawed kitties. I have a friend that rescues only declawed cats out of shelters. It is amazing how many get dumped off there, and she swears by these pellets.
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by joecool
This is a direct effect of declawing.
I totally agree with this.
post #8 of 18
why did you get the cat declawed? i think its cruel to do this half there TOES get took away and he now can never go outside , why do people do this if its to save there furniture dont get a cat in the first place,
or try a scratching board , i would never dream of doing this unless a good medical reason and we had no other choice
post #9 of 18
I agree with Snowismom. However, a lot of people (especially those who are new to owning a cat) just aren't aware of how hard it is on the animal. Some people act like it is just like trimming their nails. Most of us cat lovers know otherwise - but it seems alot don't. I know, because I've had this debate with my mother for YEARS!! She truly LOVES and adores her cats but never thought she was harming them or putting them in danger. And once finding this site, I have sent several article links to her so hopefully she won't do it again. I can be relentless with guilt trips when it comes to animals. :p

SnuggleBaby: I'm not trying to pick on you!! I'm figuring you probably are one of those who just didn't know. However, I wouldn't know what advice to give but it sounds like the others gave pretty good ones!! Good luck!!
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by hissy
Try using rabbit pellets, they feel better for declawed kitties. I have a friend that rescues only declawed cats out of shelters. It is amazing how many get dumped off there, and she swears by these pellets.

I adopt only declawed cats too! There are SOOOOO many in shelters and they just stay there indefinitely. My first cat was in a shelter for 6 months... PJ had been in for at least that long. Luckily, Teddy had only been in for a week before we got him out. My kitties were given up for no good reason, and they are the nicest, sweetest, most well behaved kitties. If you are interested in a declawed cat in the future, just start looking at your local shelters!

All of my cats have preferred soft, fine clumping litter - we use Tidy Cats. I think they were declawed when they were young (I got them when they were 7 and 8.5 years old), so they might have adjusted to different litters over time. The one thing I know to do is NOT to use crystals. While PJ didn't mind it, Teddy pooped on the floor when we had that in the box.
post #11 of 18
While many cats are declawed (which I don't agree with) and wind up not messed up physically/emotionally, the majority of litter box problems occur in declawed cats.

I'd be willing to bet most of the ads you see in the papers of "new home for declawed cat" is due to litter box problems or biting.

The cat was fine before you declawed - unfortunately YOU created this problem when none existed.

You can try a softer type of litter. The problem is getting the scent of urine, etc. out of the carpet so he won't keep using the spot.
post #12 of 18
i've never had a cat who like the shredded paper. try Yesterday's News - pellets made of newsprint. avoids the problems other litters can cause, but the cats like the texture better. i'd use the unscented version.
post #13 of 18
Yesterdays News or CareFresh would probably be better litter for now while her paws are healing.
post #14 of 18
PLEASE! Never ever declaw another cat! PLEASE! This is what happens people get them declawed for bs reasons, scratching furniture, tearing up drapes, carpet etc... if you don't want your fancy sofa tore up, DON'T GET A CAT! plain and simple. People declaw these babies and when their behavior afterwards is unacceptable they get rid of them. These people IMO are the people who think cats are disposable, get rid of them if they don't act a certain way or fit their pre-concieved mold a what the "perfect" cat should be. I don't know what your reason for doing this was, but I do know that your kitty is in a LOT of pain right now and he/she may never be the same, ever. But I am begging you PLEASE do not get rid of the kitty, or put another kitty through this awful pain. I am sorry if I am harsh, you might not have known what an awful procedure this was beforehand. Most vets try to pass it off as "like having their nails trimmed" when in fact, they cut a good chunk of the ( for lack of a better word) finger off! I was very shocked when I learned what REALLY happened when they de-claw a cat. I am sorry the kitty is pooping on the floor, I am quite sure it is pretty painful for him to use the box and get litter or paper stuck in his/her little hurt feet. It would be like us trying to use our hands without thumbs. Claws are a natural part of a cat. They need them to hunt, and defend themselves, and walk! Removing them is just plain cruel.
post #15 of 18
I have three cats, all rescues, one of which came to me declawed. I agree that a declawed cat will usually prefer a sandy texture to the litter, particularly while her paws are healing and quite tender. I use Arm & Hammer Super Scoop, it smells terrific and all my cats love it.

I'm not going to yell at you for declawing your cat because I realize you're a newbie and probably you didn't realize what an anti-declawing site you posted to. LOL However, I would like to point out that if you're worried about a cat scratching the furniture, you should provide CAT furniture, like trees or scratching posts. Since I have done so, my cats barely get on the people furniture at all.
post #16 of 18
When I first got Harley, they tried to pass off declawing like it was a side dish that went along with getting fixed. Thank goodness for TCS and their helpful people , or Harley would have been declawed as well, since I was a newbie with a kitten as well, and I really didn't know any better either. Its just such a shame that they ask everyone if they want their cats declawed, I think they should get out some info before offering it to new owners! Or maybe some do? My vet did not.

He still has his claws, and I love them!

I really do hope that you can find something that works with your kitten!
post #17 of 18
I've always liked the Yesterdays news and most vets recommend that. It's a new paper based litter (safe for their paws till they heal). Good advice Laureen227. I wouldn't put regular litter in his box tho till his paws are healed otherwise you can cause an infection. I've always had my cats declawed, because my mom is allergic to their scratches, and I've never had a temperment problem with them. I've also heard of another technique, but to me it would be and sounds more painful. It's where they cut the tendon that retracts the claws. I think that's mean.
post #18 of 18
Folks, please don't go off on a newcomer because he or she got their cat declawed. Yes we are an anti-declaw website, but it serves no purpose to get emotional about something that can't be reversed. A lot of vets are "old school" and they were taught in school the declawing was an acceptable procedure. Not all cats that are declawed turn into cats with behavior issues. Only those who have bad declaws do.

I recently borrowed some books from my vet and one of them, which he used in vet school, it was published in 1978 talks extensively about declawing.It really sends chills down my spine some of what is discussed in this textbook that was used by umpty dozen vet students.
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