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Any Catholics care to help?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
I am currently working on an assignment involving ladybugs.

What I am finding out is intriguing me.

Apparently these colorful insects are associated with a story revolving around the Virgin Mary. The seven distinct black spots on their body has to do with the seven sorrows of the Virgin Mary. Anyone ever heard of this before? And if so, care to elaborate?
post #2 of 21
Interesting! I haven't heard of this before, but I'll post your question on a Catholic message board I'm on to see if anyone has heard of it before!
post #3 of 21
In Europe, during the Middle Ages, insects were destroying the crops, so the Catholic farmers prayed to the Virgin Mary for help. Soon the Ladybugs came, ate the plant-destroying pests and saved the crops! The farmers began calling the ladybugs "The Beetles of Our Lady", and they eventually became known as "Lady Beetles"! The red wings represented the Virgin's cloak and the black spots represented her sorrows.

The seven sorrows are:

1. The Prophecy of Simeon

2. The Flight into Egypt

3. The Loss of Jesus in the Temple

4. Mary meets Jesus Carrying the Cross

5. The Crucifixion

6. Mary Receives the Dead Body of Her Son

7. The Burial of Her Son and Closing of the Tomb
post #4 of 21
Nope never heard of it
post #5 of 21
Dear MA......I´m Catholic, ...But I have to confess that is the firts time that i heard about it! ....Let me ask to Mom or Dad! ......
post #6 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by icklemiss21
In Europe, during the Middle Ages, insects were destroying the crops, so the Catholic farmers prayed to the Virgin Mary for help. Soon the Ladybugs came, ate the plant-destroying pests and saved the crops! The farmers began calling the ladybugs "The Beetles of Our Lady", and they eventually became known as "Lady Beetles"! The red wings represented the Virgin's cloak and the black spots represented her sorrows.

The seven sorrows are:

1. The Prophecy of Simeon

2. The Flight into Egypt

3. The Loss of Jesus in the Temple

4. Mary meets Jesus Carrying the Cross

5. The Crucifixion

6. Mary Receives the Dead Body of Her Son

7. The Burial of Her Son and Closing of the Tomb
I didn't know there were 7 spots on ladybugs. But what a very interesting story.
post #7 of 21
I asked my mum too

Thats all she could tell me and gave me a link (oh and told me that this is the reason I should have listened better in Sunday school blah blah blah... )
post #8 of 21
Thread Starter 
that is incredibly fascinating! I now have a new reverence for these red colored ladies with black spots!

Thank you for sharing that
post #9 of 21
next time I see a ladybug I am going to count the black spots


simply fascinating
post #10 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by yayi
I didn't know there were 7 spots on ladybugs. But what a very interesting story.
Yes, if they have more/less then 7 they're something similar but called Japanese Beetle (I think). A couple years ago, SE Michigan had them ALL OVER the place. They would get into your house, eat your plants, etc.

I grew up Catholic and haven't heard of this before. Although I really didn't pay much attention in CCD.
post #11 of 21
You really do learn something new every day.
post #12 of 21
I vaguely remembered it because when we were kids my great grandpa (who was a farmer) had a soft spot for ladybugs, I guess it was more of a farmer thing (and they just happened to be Catholic and attribute it to that) but I would guess that farmers of other religions would have been happy to see the ladybugs too.
post #13 of 21
I was also raised Catholic and had never heard this story, although I did know about the 7 spots on the ladybugs. Wow. This was fascinating!
post #14 of 21
Lady bugs come in many colors here in CA I have seen red, black, orange, tan, and all different number of spots too!

I usually buy them at the hardwere store in the spring to protect my roses from aphids. I also buy Mantis egg clusters for the fruit trees. We end up with thousands of tiny Praying Mantis babies everywhere, but the fruit is bug free. Now if I can just find a bug that will keep away the birds! LOL
post #15 of 21
I thought the title of this thread said "Cataholics" as in Cat-a-holics. I was wrong.
post #16 of 21
There are lots of species of Ladybirds, with anything from 3 to 13 spots. The 7 sorrows story is apocryphal, though I have heard it before.
post #17 of 21
Thats the first time I have heard that. It's very interesting. I'm not Catholic, but when I was growing up my mother would never kill a ladybug.
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by DragonLady

I usually buy them at the hardwere store in the spring to protect my roses from aphids. I also buy Mantis egg clusters for the fruit trees. We end up with thousands of tiny Praying Mantis babies everywhere, but the fruit is bug free. Now if I can just find a bug that will keep away the birds! LOL
You buy them??? Heck, I'll send you a box o' bugs! There are times when you can't even talk when you're outside lest you find a little "crunchy treat" flying into your mouth!

Interesting story...I never realized how they got their name. I guess I should have paid attention in CCD, huh?
post #19 of 21
Thread Starter 
The orange, yellow and light red ones are from Asia and they bite, so be careful.
post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hydroaxe
I thought the title of this thread said "Cataholics" as in Cat-a-holics. I was wrong.
post #21 of 21
Actually the Ladybirds name does come form teh Virgin Mary -

Q. How did the ladybug get its name?
A. In Europe, during the Middle Ages, insects were destroying the crops, so the Catholic farmers prayed to the Virgin Mary for help. Soon the Ladybugs came, ate the plant-destroying pests and saved the crops! The farmers began calling the ladybugs "The Beetles of Our Lady", and they eventually became known as "Lady Beetles"! The red wings represented the Virgin's cloak and the black spots represented her joys and sorrows. They didn't differentiate between males and females.

Not only that, but in Scnadinavia they're called something that literally translates to Mary... something aong those lines - I'll ask Rune when his hangover wears off I'm not catholic though.... there are several stories as far as I can tell....

I always thought it was a pretty ironic name for one of the most promiscuous insects on the planet.
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