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Schools not warm enough for kids to learn??

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
This topic was briefly mentioned on CBS news last night. Because of school budget constraints and the increase heating costs schools are turning down the thermostat. They say kids can't adjust to the 68 degree heat. Its effecting their learning??? Well put on some more clothes!!! My house hasn't been above 68 all month yet!!
(and I walked 3 miles uphill in a blizzard so I wouldn't miss school!! )
This to me is another case of coddling children. I guess they don't realize who ultimately pays the school's heating bills. Or is it that they can't rum around in their skimpy Brittney Spears clothing???
Any thoughts???
post #2 of 27
68 is definitely too cold for me. When I'm cold I can't concentrate and don't function very well so I can certainly understand the kids not learning.
post #3 of 27
Some people learn best in cool settings. I do know the heat was out in one wing of my old high school a few years ago. Most kids wore coats and my sister even brought a fleece lap blanket! Fortunatley it wasn't the middle of winter at that time.
post #4 of 27
I understand the high school kids in a kewler room , might actually keep them awake but little kids need 70 ish to be good learners..
post #5 of 27
Hey 68* is cold... I wear 3 layers just to stay warm and I'm still cold. I can understand why it would affect learning
post #6 of 27
Yeah, too cold for me, my brain freezes up or something...wait, that hapens when I'm hot too...oh well....
post #7 of 27
It was never warmer than 68* in my parent's house when I was growing up. Never. My parents were cheap. LOL And once I got into my own apartment and had to pay for my own heat - I believe in 68* too. Wear more clothes, IMO.

Besides, and this is coming from someone who edits the HVAC specifications for control sequences regularly. If the setpoint is 68*, the heating unit & fans will kick in at 68*. It's not like 68* is the highest the temp will ever be. Then take into consideration the heat from the occupants, and most likely it's rarely actually 68* except first thing in the morning when the warm up cycle has completed and there is no residual heat from the occupants.
post #8 of 27
Personally I would love it to be 68 right now - its up at about 80 in my office and if I turn it down they set it higher because now they are cold. I keep mine at 68 - 20c is fine for me and it does get warmer than that with lots of kids in a room - my mum keeps her classroom set at 70 and complains that it gets warm in there after an hour of 25 people in a room. But then they wear school uniform with long skirts, shirts, sweaters etc and not britney spears type clothes
post #9 of 27
when i was at school we had uniforms and werent allowed to wear others jumpers or warmer clothes on top. sometimes the rooms were so cold you could see our breath and our hands went numb!

it was automatic detention for wearing scraf, coat, fleece or gloves

we also had one teacher who liked everyone to look the same, so if one girl took of her jumper the whole class had too! i kid you not!

so quite often we had to freeze in subzero tempretures with no jumpers!
post #10 of 27
Thats one of the things I like about my school (the one my mum works in too) the school uniform rules are strict and they have a summer and winter uniform - you can not wear hat/scarf/gloves etc in class (but then its not that cold) but the wool sweaters are warm.
post #11 of 27
I'm with the kids on this one. I know that even now, at the ripe old age of 24, I have a hard time concentrating at work because it's so cold in here.
post #12 of 27
A couple of degrees could make a difference. I think they could turn it up a little. There is a difference in having 68 degrees in a home compared to a classroom. At home you can get up and move around at will. In a classroom you are expected to sit still and write. Body temperatures are cooler when there is less activity. I know if my office is too cold my fingertips get numb. My boss took the hint when he saw me typing with my gloves on.
post #13 of 27
1. My office is so cold this morning that I put on my jacket and if I could get away with it, I'd put on my gloves too. LOL I am perimenopausal and usually you'll see me FANNING myself, not shivering, so this is most unusual.

2. Every September without fail, the one item my mother always insisted I take to school and keep in my classroom cubby was a cardigan sweater. In the energy-conscious 1970s, this was a smart move. By the end of the year, I'd usually gotten a lot of wear out of it!
post #14 of 27
I am in the office by myself today and have the heat on at 65 and find it comfortable to work in (especially compared to the 23 it is outside) but then when its this cold I get more uncomfortable from it being too warm if I keep going out into the cold and back into the heat.
post #15 of 27
It's 20 and snowing here I am so moving to Florida where it's 70* right now.
post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by eburgess
It's 20 and snowing here I am so moving to Florida where it's 70* right now.
Well... its only 56 on the spacecoast. You might want to try south FL.
post #17 of 27
all i have to say is that my parents house is never above 62 degrees. I like to call it frugal. At work I keep it at 70 degrees, but I could live iwht 68 if i had to.
post #18 of 27
If it's too warm in classrooms, the kids have a tendency to get drowsy. What's wrong with keeping the thermostat set at 68°, and expecting them to wear winter clothing?
I just checked to see what the temperature is in our living room right now (the second-warmest room in the house, after the bathroom): 14.8°C/58.6°F. I'm wearing tights under my jeans, and have a fleece pullover on over a long-sleeved T-shirt. Hubby is wearing jeans and a fleece pullover over a short-sleeved tee. We're both comfortable, and Jamie spends winter days on his perch above the radiator. Surely 10 ° higher is warm enough for most people, provided they're dressed properly?
post #19 of 27
Being a cold blooded person myself (if it's too cold I can't get warmed up), I have to side with the kids on this one. I'm at work right now and it's probably 70 degrees or so here and I'm still in a sweater. I find it hard to concentrate when I get too cold and yes I dress warmly even in the summer. And at work I am allowed to get up and walk around.

At school we had to sit for long periods of time and before the school turned on the heater ever year I would freeze even with thick sweater on. Then you'd go in the halls and move around and it would be much warmer.
post #20 of 27
I'm wearing a fleece sweater and socks and it's 70 in here. I can understand why people are concerned, I was always freezing as a child and still am! I could see setting it at 70. It's amazing the difference those two degrees makes. I've paid my own heating bills for 8 years now and I've never had my thermastat below 70. I use the budget pay plan and pay $50 a month every month and it always works out perfect at 70 degrees all year around.
post #21 of 27
I was born and raised in the Northeastern U.S., where we say, "If you can live here, you can live anywhere." Temperatures and humidity can be a bit extreme there. Now I'm living in a country (Germany) with a mild "Continental climate". I see loads of people in summer clothes, enjoying the sun, when temperatures hit 20° C /68° F, but they complain about freezing when room temperatures in winter are around 18° C /64° F? That doesn't make sense.
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcat
I was born and raised in the Northeastern U.S., where we say, "If you can live here, you can live anywhere." Temperatures and humidity can be a bit extreme there. Now I'm living in a country (Germany) with a mild "Continental climate". I see loads of people in summer clothes, enjoying the sun, when temperatures hit 20° C /68° F, but they complain about freezing when room temperatures in winter are around 18° C /64° F? That doesn't make sense.
It is all relative. When we have warm weather 26°/80° F and the weather drops to 14°C/58°F, everyone complains that it is cold. But when we have -12° C/ 10° F (like we did on Sunday) and it goes to 14° C/58° F (like it is today) then everyone is almost ready for sun-bathing.

As for work, they keep the office at a constant 21°C/70° F which is ok except that my desk is under the vent so the breeze always blowing on me. Often in the summer, I will go outside and thaw my fingers out. But I also was raised during the energy crisis of the 1970s so I just try bundling up.
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by katachtig
But I also was raised during the energy crisis of the 1970s so I just try bundling up.
Me, too, which explains a lot to those whose memories reach that far back.
post #24 of 27
As a mother of 2 kids, I have to say thats probably why kids get sick in school. They go from a warm home to a cold school, to colder outside at P.E. and then to a warm car or bus and then cold outside, then a warm home. We pay our taxes to have our children in school and trust the schools with our most valuable possesions.... OUR CHILDREN... they should be taken care of in a healthy WARM enviroment.


and Btw, I WISH it was 70 here in FL... it's 45 right now
post #25 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockcat
A couple of degrees could make a difference. I think they could turn it up a little. There is a difference in having 68 degrees in a home compared to a classroom. At home you can get up and move around at will. In a classroom you are expected to sit still and write. Body temperatures are cooler when there is less activity. I know if my office is too cold my fingertips get numb. My boss took the hint when he saw me typing with my gloves on.


Exactly. My hands have been like that too even since I was a child - the least bit chilly and they freeze up and won't work properly.
post #26 of 27
Well, it's 38* outside and I've got my thermostat set on 68* and I'm cold. The heat pump just turned off. I am so looking forward to menopause ! My sister says that in my case that my temperature will probably just warm up to normal LOL. I'm really not happy until it gets to 80* or so, and temps of 90*+ don't bother me.

I grew up during the 70's also (graduated '75) but you know I don't remember cold classrooms? I do remember hot ones though. Used to really look forward to my senior English class. Mrs. Stewart had a window unit A/C in her classroom .
post #27 of 27
Thread Starter 
I checked the thermostat in the living room-its 65 degree so up in this room its got to be about the same. I have socks and slippers sweat pants, a thin sweatshirt and as we were working the the workshop garage my long sleeved Under Armor mock turtleneck on. And I'm okay-as I also graduated HS 1975-I don't remember the HS being cold??? It was a brand new school though.
For anyone that is cold I would recommend investing in some "Under Armor" high tech clothing. I bought this shirt last yr as when a worked part of my job involved working outside. While the stuff is pricey I think it does a great job. On the other hand I am usually warm and have symptons of perimenopause now that causes me to be really warm!!
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