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How does one become a breeder?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
In a future, I'd love to breed Norwedgian Forest cats, or maybe a stranger breed. I've looked around the internet, but I can't find any information about how to become a breeder.

Can anyone help me?
post #2 of 17
First join a breeders association that works with your breed so you can learn everything you can about the business and the breed. Go to as many shows as you can to determine which breed fits you best and talk to the breeders there. Make sure you are financially secure to take on this venture (also it can be time consuming). Start with only 1 female and work your way up as you adjust to the work load. Don't plan on housing a stud at first because a special enclosure would need to be built.

The cost of a breeding female should be about twice the cost of a pet of that breed. Expect to pay out quite a bit of money. Also remember you won't be making any money.

Make sure its what you really want to do and expect a lot of opposition from people. Your heart has to be in it fully.

I'm currnetly going through this. My first girl has just entered her first heat. Its so hard to believe shes already old enough. We'll be waiting for her third heat before she is bred for the first time.

If you go to amazon.com there should be a couple books on breeding cats. These can be helpful for the beginner seeking information.
post #3 of 17
post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thank you very much. I'll take a look at the pages when I'm not so pressed for time
post #5 of 17
Avalon.....you don`t know how tempted I was to tell you what came to my mind when I read the titile of this post! :-)
Linda
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avalon
Thank you very much. I'll take a look at the pages when I'm not so pressed for time
Awesome. Good to see you researching, researching, researching! and not just jumping in to it and mating two cats together.
post #7 of 17
One Word...

Mentor!!!

Probably the hardest to find, but a must!
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Imagyne
One Word...

Mentor!!!

Probably the hardest to find, but a must!
I agree! Make sure the person you buy your queen from will be willing to mentor you, if not then find someone ahead. My breeder is helping me through everything which is wonderful. If anything were to happen, or any question comes up (and tons do!), you always have someone to call or e-mail.
post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stampit3d
Avalon.....you don`t know how tempted I was to tell you what came to my mind when I read the titile of this post! :-)
Linda
Woops!!!

Don't worry, I never take offense at sexual jokes, only at insults
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by stampit3d
Avalon.....you don`t know how tempted I was to tell you what came to my mind when I read the titile of this post! :-)
Linda
I said something to that effect to my mom once. She almost panicked! It was funny. She warned me to watch my words around others .
post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 
The problem is that I visit a Spanish forum where we are all friends and throw some pretty course jokes at each other. I have to keep reminding myself that that's the exception, not the rule
post #12 of 17
Buy a pair of kittens. You'll learn in a hurry. You'll want your tom quarters all built & ready for when the boy starts spraying.

You should get information from whatever cat registry is used in Spain.
Information like what you need to do for a cattery name. Do you need several cats to get a cattery name. Each registry has a set of rules or conduct guidlines. You need to follow registry guidelines, so that you can register your kittens.

With one pair of cats, the worst thing that can happen, is if it doesn't work out, you have to alter both of them. Whoever you buy your cats from can answer lots of questions. A few basic things that might save you some grief. Only buy kittens out of cats who have tested negative for FeLV & FIV. If the kittens were treated for URI (Upper resp. infection) buy from someone else. A well kitten who had a course of a URI will be fine as a pet, but if it happened to have herpes, & you buy it as a breeder kitten. All your kittens will get sick when they are 5 to 6 weeks old.

I wanted NFC's in 2001. Without experience, no one in the USA wanted to sell me a breedable one. They wanted me to buy a casterated tom cat. Show that, and then if things went ok (if they liked me) they might sell me a breedable kitten some day. I've been around too long for that sort of BS.

So we ended up with a pair of Ragdolls, discovered we could import NFC's, so started with 2 breeds. The Ragdolls were nothing but trouble. Massive amounts of money spent on breedable kittens who would not, could not, or would allow nothing to breed them. One cat probably had herpes, as she made all her kids sick. All 8 of them. Cost me $800 in vet bills to get the litter well, and keep it that way. We did not continue breeding Ragdolls.

Fortunately the NFC's are healthier, or possibly I was lucky enough to get healthier cats to begin with. The biggest problems have been queens who really weren't made for breeding. 2 had their kittens too late, & needed c-sections if I wanted live kittens. Both were spayed and petted out. Another wanted to lay on her side & not allow a male to breed her. She was so pretty, I had a show title on her already, but went ahead & petted her out. Another never had enough milk. I got tired of bottle feeding kittens in the middle of the night, so petted her out also. She had such gorgeous kittens.

If you purchase 4 to 6 breedable kittens, you can spend $30,000 the first year. That is the price of the cats. Initial vet bills includeing tests for whatever you are worried about. Setting up living quarters for a couple toms. Buying kittening cages & setting them up the way you want them. Other equipement you will need, maintaining cats in good condition, going to a few shows. Queens are pretty easy, they can just run around the house. You wouldn't need a kittening cage, if you have a room you can lock a soon to be mother in. If you don't your cat will do things like have kittens in the closet, under the bed, on top the bed, under the recliner, in the bookcase, etc. etc.

Raiseing kittens is a little more complicated then you would think.
post #13 of 17
Heh that is the exact reason I'm not starting with a male. From what I've just learned from people it can take 2-3 months for a female to be in with a male and let the male actually breed her. If you just want to start out just get 1 female and go for stud service. Find out if its really what you want and go from there.
post #14 of 17
I would highly recommend finding a very good breeder and getting a show quality cat to show in the premiership class. There is so much to learn in show halls from experienced breeders. It will also help to have a mentor who will help you learn all about the breed, presentation, grooming, ect. Then when you are ready the breeder will hopefully be able to help you out. CFA has a mentoring program, its a very good program and will help you establish ties with reputable breeders.

http://www.cfa.org/mentor/
post #15 of 17
You'll discover if you ever breed for a few years, that you will do NO STUD SERVICE for anyone. Your cattery is much safer as a closed cattery. We started out with a closed cattery & have kept it that way. I get several requests for stud service every year.
Your own cattery will get used to whatever viruses they are carrying. Each time you bring in a new cat, you are setting yourself up for some viral problem to go through the whole works. Isolation does not stop some things. You can have some of the worst days of your life after you bring in a new cat to an established group of cats.
I'd never recommend offering stud service to anyone. Unless the owner of the stud had that cat in a separate building, away from all other cats, then maybe it would be safe. Then stud cats cause beauty problems with females, at least with long haired cats. They grab the neck fur to cotrol the female, also kneed the sides of the female with their legs. What you get is HUGE knots around the neck & sides, which require clipping off. This can happen in ONE evening. The gorgeous female with the lovely mane, now looks sorry. That first years mane never seems to grow back after a tom has done it in. Moral of the story, show the female prior to mating. Take any photo's you need for internet websites prior to mating. Don't breed someone else's lovely female. I'll guarantee they will not understand what has happened to their wonderful girl.
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by WellingtonCats
This is a very nice info from the site... thanks..
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluekat
NO STUD SERVICE for anyone. Your cattery is much safer as a closed cattery.
I agree with that sentiment. If you're going to breed cats, get your own stud. It makes sense in so many ways, not just disease control.
If you can't house your own stud, I'd take a close look at whether it's too soon to start a breeding program. Because really, it's not much of a program if you don't have complete knowledge of health, temperament, lineage and genetics of the cats you're using for breeding.
Without your own stud on premises, your knowledge of the cat is sketchy at best.
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