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How do you treat your bottom?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Dax's anal sac problem seems to have come back. She scooted on the floor twice in the last few days so I've just been to the vets and made and appointment. They recommended sedating her, expressing the sacs, flushing them out and using steroids and antibiotics.

The last time she had them flushed was around seven months ago. I was told the problem doesnt come back as quickly if they fully flush and use the steroid antibiotic combination in the sacs. Is this true?

I'm a dubious about surgery - 7 months is a nice stretch of time but if it keeps recurring it can't be a nice feeling for her.

I was just wondering how other people handle anal sac issues with their cats.
post #2 of 21
My Loki's right anal sack ruptured in early June and after the surgery I now have schedule of appointments to keep with my Vet to assure this will NEVER happen again.

1- 2 weeks after surgery
2- 1 Month after surgery
3- 2 Months after the 1 months visit - he expressed the anal sack to see how much was acumulated and depending on results I got another time frame
4- we are now at 4 months after the 2 month exam - which will be end of Dec. 2005

of course if something happens in between he'll be at the Vets before he can say meow.

Might want to discuss this type of a schedule as well.

Good lcuk
post #3 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hell603
3- 2 Months after the 1 months visit - he expressed the anal sack to see how much was acumulated and depending on results I got another time frame
Sorry to hear about Loki's problem.
When he gets the sacs expressed, does Loki also get sedated?
post #4 of 21
No sedation - just one very squirmy kitty...
post #5 of 21
The title of this thread struck me funny!!
post #6 of 21
What causes there to be problem with blocked anal sacs? Is there any preventative measures that can be taken?
post #7 of 21
The vet said that the poop needs to be firm enough to express them naturally. I believe I read somewhere that table scraps will make them worse, too.
post #8 of 21
Thread Starter 
Yes, I tried to make it a catchy title...

I didn't know that about table scraps, but Dax doesn't get anything except on rare occasions.

I have heard about adding fiber to the diet but has that worked for anyone else?
I have used re-hydrated psyllium husks in her food on occasion. Also, does it make sense? Do wild cats really eat much fiber? Do they really scavenge on other non-meat items that much? I thought if a cat ate lots of meat they would produce less, but harder stools.

If anyone can shed some light that would be great I've tried to look into this matter a bit but I just get more confused
post #9 of 21
Unfortunately there are no preventive meassures according to my VET. Some cats are prone to it others aren't. Just keep an eye out and if something looks fishy have it looked at right away
post #10 of 21
Dexter, my 5 yr. old male cat, has scent sacs that plug.
There are quite a few past threads in this forum on scent sac/scent gland issues.
You can use the "search forums" tool, to read the past threads.
This problem can be quite stressful on the cats & their worried humans.There are no known simple solutions.
Please keep us informed about how your kitty is doing & what treatments you are using. Thanks
post #11 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by xocats
There are no known simple solutions.
Thats for sure
I have been looking at some of the past threads and on the rest of the web but it's still a pretty confusing issue

Dax has been for her squeeze and flush this morning - She managed to bite the vet when she tried to listen to her heart. Of course, this was after she had done a preliminary check on how full her sacs were so Dax was feeling a bit hateful. I felt like every other silly pet owner "oh but my dear fluffy never bites!"

Anyway, the first lot of sedative didnt really do the trick and we had to wait for a second dose before she was sedated enough for the vet to flush her out properly. I stayed to watch of course, being fascinated by all things gruesome and medical.

The vet took samples of some of the material removed from each sac. They are going to check the bacteria to make sure she is getting the right antibiotics to help clear it up and help prevent it from recurring.

Poor monkey is still groggy from her double shot of sedative, but she has been awkwardly moving about. I have a warm nest set up in here where I can keep an eye on her untill she has her full motor skills back.

oh, a last thing I found kinda funny - the vet told me she would be out for quite a while with the extra sedative but being a real mother goose I was worried my baby wasnt waking up... I decided a good way to check how deep she was under was to appeal to her love of seafood - specifically, baby shrimp. I have a bag frozen for treats so I got one out, heated it a little and dangled it under her nose... The little mouth started moving and she gulped - it must have given her sweet shrimpy dreams
post #12 of 21
Awww...baby shrimp will do it every time. :
Dexter has not had his scent sacs flushed. That might be an option for him.
Thanks for the update. Let me know the the flushing worked.
Here's a big hug for Dax.
post #13 of 21
I would say adding fiber wouldn't be a bad idea. In the wild you have to figure a cat is getting whatever was in the mouse's stomach. So I would say they do get some fiber in their diet. It might be resonable as well to maybe switch to a different food? My sister started feeding her dogs Science Diet, and their poop was always soft, she switched to IVD Duck and Pea and they have really hard stools now.

As you have been told, generally speaking, when a or cat poops its anal glands get expressed. You are lucky, you get a kitty who is "special"
post #14 of 21
Dexter is on a higher fiber diet. We try for a larger, firm stool.
He is currently eating a Weight Management food for the fiber content.

I am not familiar with IVD. I will check it.
I like your positive way of looking at our kitties health challenge...they are "special.":

Thanks for the feedback.
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by xocats
I am not familiar with IVD. I will check it.
I like your positive way of looking at our kitties health challenge...they are "special.":
Yeah, IVD was bought out by Royal Canin. Just to give you a familiar bag to look at LOL. *points to royal canin banner*

I know all about special cats. We just had him tested for allergies and are waiting on the results, he's been fighting with pruritis on his face since I got him. So even though I can't relate in an anal gland sort of way, I can relate to the stress of trying to fix a problem.

Someone has to take care of the elite group of special kitties
post #16 of 21
We love our "elite special kitties."
Good luck with Napolean's allergy problem.
Thanks for the info. about Royan Canin buying IVD. Now I know that it is a mainstream food.
I checked out IVD's web site. I am going to see if I can find out were it is sold in my area.
Although my kitties are doing OK on their current diet...I am always open to improvement.
I would like to have a closer look at it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plebayo
Someone has to take care of the elite group of special kitties
post #17 of 21
I just took my Amber to the vet for her yearly doses, and the doctor told me my cat had the largest anal glands she's ever seen. I dont think Amber was proud of this announcement.

Anyway, the doctor prescribed Hills Science Diet Feline z/d low allergen (the most expensive food ever made in the existence of the world) and told me that switching food brands can cause this problem, which I am guilty of. Amber has had her glands expressed before, about 2 years ago, so this is a known problem for me (whenever she gets too much loving she gets excited, stuff comes out, its not pretty.) So when I brought her for her vaccinations today I asked the vet to look at the business end. Thus, the glandular proclamation.

However, I'm not too keen to keep her on the Hill's prescription and am going to be looking for an alternative low-allergen food.
post #18 of 21
Awww Amber....welcome to the Elite Special Kitty club.

Why do you have Amber on a low-allergen food?
post #19 of 21
The vet told me that her glands were enlarged due to allergies due to switching food brands. Otherwise there are no symptoms, no nothing, to indicate any problems.
post #20 of 21
Quote:
Anyway, the doctor prescribed Hills Science Diet Feline z/d low allergen (the most expensive food ever made in the existence of the world
We should make a support group for people who have to buy it. I will say, I'm a bit spoiled because I can buy it at cost, and not the jacked up extra $10-$15 added on... but holy cow! Not to mention my cat thinks the dry is too bland, so I give him free choice dry, and then half a can of wet in the AM and half of a can in the PM.

LOL sorry to drag off topic...
post #21 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plebayo
We should make a support group for people who have to buy it. I will say, I'm a bit spoiled because I can buy it at cost, and not the jacked up extra $10-$15 added on... but holy cow! Not to mention my cat thinks the dry is too bland, so I give him free choice dry, and then half a can of wet in the AM and half of a can in the PM.

LOL sorry to drag off topic...
No! All discussion welcome... So your vet thought her problems might be caused by food? And you are getting any response from the new diet?

My special kitty is doing well today - I think she feels good with all that gunk out of her. We get the bacterial results in a couple of days. For now she is curled up on the sofa next to my desk, right where a kitty should be when it is snowing
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