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Pure white cat~ - Page 2

post #31 of 44
I strongly doubt your kitty has turkish in her (Popcorn) - a lot of people think their cats do if they have similar markings but I doubt there would be a lot of Turkish van Crosses out there
post #32 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherriey
I think my cat might have quite a bit turkish van in her. She's obviously not full though. The problem with reading the cat handbook is that the more I find out about different breeds the more breeds I'd like to adopt. lol Turkish Van has just been added to a list along with Siamese and maybe even Sphynx (depending on where I move to).
Cherriey,

As our long-time buddy Sam says, it is unlikely that Popcorn shares a Turkish Van heritage, but it is remotely possible. We tend to doubt it after studying Popcorn's attractve photo in your siggy, and Turkish Van breeders may be particularly cautious about protecting the integrity of the breed.

As an example of this, we were unable to take delivery of our Samwise and Galadriel until after they had been neutered and we had been interviewed and approved by the breeder as being likely loving and caring owners who could be expected to give them a good home. We had to contractually agree to return them to the breeder should we ever decide for whatever reason that they could not stay with us or with someone else approved by the breeder or should one or both of them outlive us. These are not uncommon well-meaning demands of trustworthy breeders devoted to the continuity of their particular breed and their well-being.

We wish you the very best of luck as you search for what, for you, will be "the perfect cat," and we do hope you do not forget about the Turkish Van. You might find this article to be of interest in learning more about this fascinating breed. This article describes the appearance and characteristics of Samwise and Galadriel absolutely perfectly. On the left margin of this web site you will find links to other breeds in which you may also be interested.

We might in particular point out to you the discussion about the word "van," and its origin in catdom. Many cats, of whatever breed, may have a "van" pattern, as indeed might Popcorn, and we are certain that our mutual friend Sam "Down Under" knows well the charming "Persian Van." But Persian Van is not a distinct breed -- a Persian Van is a Persian with a van pattern. But there is only one "Turkish Van," a true distinct breed, originating in the vicinity of Lake Van, hence the word "Van." The misuse of this word leads us and other devotees of the breed to resist referring to the breed as "Vans," and we always precede the word with "Turkish."

All the very best, from a lovely day on a Texas beach.

Jim and Ann
post #33 of 44
Absolutely right!
post #34 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beach Bum
We might in particular point out to you the discussion about the word "van," and its origin in catdom. Many cats, of whatever breed, may have a "van" pattern, as indeed might Popcorn, and we are certain that our mutual friend Sam "Down Under" knows well the charming "Persian Van." But Persian Van is not a distinct breed -- a Persian Van is a Persian with a van pattern. But there is only one "Turkish Van," a true distinct breed, originating in the vicinity of Lake Van, hence the word "Van." The misuse of this word leads us and other devotees of the breed to resist referring to the breed as "Vans," and we always precede the word with "Turkish."

My white kitty displays the van patterning as do many cats. Its a genetic expression of color. The Turkish Van all display this expression but so do many many other cats because it might even be a dominant trait (not entirely sure on that).
post #35 of 44
Oh how I wish it was a genetic trait!! Harlequins (we don't call them vans in NZ) are the most wanted thing over here! It's so hard to breed them though.
post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by WellingtonCats
Oh how I wish it was a genetic trait!! Harlequins (we don't call them vans in NZ) are the most wanted thing over here! It's so hard to breed them though.
It is genetic. Maybe I was wrong though, maybe its recessive if its difficult. Isn't harlequin slightly different than van? Something to do with spotting on the side maybe..not really sure just remember reading something...
post #37 of 44
I'm sorry. I didn't mean to imply that I automatically assumed that any cat having the Van pattern was automatically a Turkish Van. It's just I've been reading up on them and she seems to have a lot of their personality, her fur is... sort of longish and the Turkish Van's faces remind me a lot of my cat. I was just noticing similarities and wondering if there could be some Turkish in her background somewhere. They sound like awesome cats! lol Actually I've added them to my 'I wish I had a cat from that breed' list! Is it true that they'll swim readily enough?
post #38 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by plastikpony
I don't even know where to start looking for a regular purebred white cat
What do you define as a purebred white cat? I have a "purebred" white cat. She is a purebred domestic short hair. lol She doesn't have any papers, she is deaf, and I love her as much as I would any "fancy"(no offense to anyone, I love all of those well bred cats, too) cat. Here's a picture of her(with her best "angry cat" face ).

I just had to show off her picture! Some other people got to post pictures, so I did, too!

I hope you find the cat you are looking for. I don't really know anything about well bred cats. That's what I am here for, to learn!
post #39 of 44
Sorry I do mean recessive.

No what you consider the Van pattern in the United States is what we call the Harlequin pattern here in NZ. I voted in a recent vote saying we change the name to van for good but I was about the only one in 40 that voted for the change! LOL!
post #40 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherriey
I'm sorry. I didn't mean to imply that I automatically assumed that any cat having the Van pattern was automatically a Turkish Van. It's just I've been reading up on them and she seems to have a lot of their personality, her fur is... sort of longish and the Turkish Van's faces remind me a lot of my cat. I was just noticing similarities and wondering if there could be some Turkish in her background somewhere. They sound like awesome cats! lol Actually I've added them to my 'I wish I had a cat from that breed' list! Is it true that they'll swim readily enough?
I must sincerely aologize, Cherriey, as I did not mean to suggest that assumption. My note is unfortunately easily read that way, but it was just a result of typing off the top of my head too fast. My fingers get ahead of my brain. I suspect that after 70 years my brain is slowing down faster than are my fingers.

After observing our two critters and discussions with others obsessed by the breed at cat shows and on the 'Net, we have decided that the answer to your question about swimming is "Yes and No." That is, some Turkish Vans do like to swim; others do not. It appears to be the general consensus that of all the breeds, the Turkish Van is possibly the one most likely to like to swim. Here is a famous photo of Matabiru Lady MacBeth enjoying a dip. In the wild Turkish Vans were observed to swim in Lake Van and nearby streams catching fish as part of their natural diet.

There is a fun myth about Turkish Vans, which I will jump at the chance to share with you.

Lake Van is located not too very far from Mount Ararat. As you know, Mount Ararat is reputed to be the place where Noah's ark came ashore. All the animals had been cooped up together on the ark for a very long time, and the ark had become a rather smelly unpleasant place to be. When the peak of Mount Ararat loomed up on the horizon two little white cats with big red tails and spots of red on their heads, a little boy and a little girl, decided "we're out of here," jumped over the side, and swam ashore to Mount Ararat -- the first animals to leave the ark. The little boy and the little girl were the first mom and dad of what became the Turkish Van breed, as as the flood continued to recede they and their progeny made their home at nearby Lake Van, where they continued to swim happily forever more, becoming known to this day as "The Swimming Cat."

And that's the truth.

(My apologies to those readers to whom I have related this tale before).

In the case of Samwise and Molly, I am afraid that to them the sight of water in the bathtub means a bath is coming, and that is not their most favorite thing. Back in their showcat days they got the standard patented 32-step Turkish Van bath before each show, another story in itself. This was often weekly, and was not their most pleasant experience. It could well be, however, that if they were given the opportunity to swim in a pool or such they might be right at home. We hesitate to give this a try, as they cannot be trusted to not romp off into the countryside, and where we live there are bobcats and coyotes wandering about, resulting in an absence of feral cats.

All the very best from down here on a lovely day in Texas. We hope you will drop us a note when you find your "perfect cat."

Jim, along with Ann, Samwise, Molly and Miss Kitty
post #41 of 44
Hey I love reading myths about cats! Just the possibility that they are more likely to jump in water and go for a swim is amazingly wonderful to me in itself! =0)

Ack! You have that problem there too? Here there is a popular story (mainly because it's true) that is passed around as a warning to animal owners or just everyone in general. It deals with a mountain lion who (because of the over abundance of its kind and therefore the lack of the deer it likes to eat) parked itself outside a woman's trailer house. Now this woman had quite a few cats and got quite tired of opening and closing the door for whenever they wanted to go out and so had long ago had a pet door installed. The mountain lion sat outside that pet door and quietly ate every one of those cats as it left the building. Unfortunately for the woman the pet door was then useless to her.
post #42 of 44
Where did you get the idea of what the US considers "van" pattern? Van just means the color is restricted to the head and tail (and one or two body spots). The himilayan pattern is a "pointed" pattern on siamese or persians.

There's a big difference in the two. CFA combined the himilayans and persians and puts the "himilayan" in the "pointed" class as a sub-class with persians. They would compete with all the other persians for best of breed.

ACFA (not sure of TICA) still keeps them separate at this time.
post #43 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenKitty45
Where did you get the idea of what the US considers "van" pattern? Van just means the color is restricted to the head and tail (and one or two body spots). The himilayan pattern is a "pointed" pattern on siamese or persians.

There's a big difference in the two. CFA combined the himilayans and persians and puts the "himilayan" in the "pointed" class as a sub-class with persians. They would compete with all the other persians for best of breed.

ACFA (not sure of TICA) still keeps them separate at this time.
With respect, Golden Kitty, I suspect that you may have misread Sam's note just a bit. She was referring to "Harlequin," not "Himalayan." "Harlequin" has only fairly recently, I believe, been replaced even in the US itself, in general, by "Van," to label the pattern you rightly describe. When I say "fairly recently," keep in mind that I am 70 years of age, and this is a relative concept.

All the best,

Jim
post #44 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenKitty45
Where did you get the idea of what the US considers "van" pattern? Van just means the color is restricted to the head and tail (and one or two body spots). The himilayan pattern is a "pointed" pattern on siamese or persians.

There's a big difference in the two. CFA combined the himilayans and persians and puts the "himilayan" in the "pointed" class as a sub-class with persians. They would compete with all the other persians for best of breed.

ACFA (not sure of TICA) still keeps them separate at this time.
Are you referring to my post?

If you are you will of course know that I have been breeding Persians for six years now. I know exactly what the US considers the Van pattern. I have handled and loved over many a "Van" cat in my time.

As Jim said I was referring to Harlequin and not Himilayans.

Thanks Jim!
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